Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Eating one right now.
    Just curious about the bubbles...does anyone know?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Using a vacuum, I think. It takes a lot of timing, but they must have machines for it - but I think they have the melted chocolate, use the vacuum on it to get air bubbles out of it and then let it set.

    I saw something similar on a cookery show at the weekend. (Pretty sure it was Saturday Kitchen - they were trying to make the perfect Chocolate Cake, so they did this bubble technique)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...2090317AAxVyI7


    :rolleyes:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    They're actually the area left by the shells of the notorious chocolate maggot. They prey upon unsuspecting people who begin to question their very existence.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stu Laverty)
    Using a vacuum, I think. It takes a lot of timing, but they must have machines for it - but I think they have the melted chocolate, use the vacuum on it to get air bubbles out of it and then let it set.

    I saw something similar on a cookery show at the weekend. (Pretty sure it was Saturday Kitchen - they were trying to make the perfect Chocolate Cake, so they did this bubble technique)
    Yeah that crazy Heston blumenthal uses a vaccuum all the time :yep:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    A vacuum would mean a space that has no air or atmosphere though :confused: Surely it would be the opposite, they 'airate' liquid chocolate as it sets?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was actually wondering about this the other day too. The explanation is intriguing.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TylerDurden)
    Eating one right now.
    Just curious about the bubbles...does anyone know?
    one of life's many great mysteries - i'm tempted to put it down to magic and leave it at that - lol
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In an Aerodrome...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GazzyG)
    In an Aereodrome...
    lol surely they must pump air in rather than use a vacuum and take air out no? Surely they just heavily airate the chocy and then let it set
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stu Laverty)
    I saw something similar on a cookery show at the weekend. (Pretty sure it was Saturday Kitchen - they were trying to make the perfect Chocolate Cake, so they did this bubble technique)
    I (shamefully) saw that too. I love the fact that they pointed out that they couldn't tell viewers to use the industry machinery, instead showing how to do it with a vacuum bag and a vacuum cleaner - very easy! Everyone will be doing it now(!).
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Here, this is what I was talking about:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006v5y2

    Watch it today, because tomorrow it goes away because iPlayer is like that. Watch from about 42:00 to 46:00 - that might be how it's done (only with big machinery and stuff)

    As I said, I have no idea if this is what they do for Aero's.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aero_(c...e)#Manufacture

    This wasn't hard.

    http://v3.espacenet.com/publicationD...59583&KC=&FT=E

    Further reading.
 
 
 

2,682

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.