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Would a masters help you to become more employable? watch

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    My careers advisor says that a non-vocational masters won't help me become more employable. Is that right?
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    I hope not. :redface:
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    I wish I had your careers advisor. Mine told me to do a degree in media studies.
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    Duh
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    (Original post by she)
    My careers advisor says that a non-vocational masters won't help me become more employable. Is that right?
    Your question is pretty insanely vague. So I will be vague back and say, it depends.
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    depends on the employer.

    some will value it some wont. same as most things.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    I wish I had your careers advisor. Mine told me to do a degree in media studies.
    Lol, I bet there is some sort of conspiracy - the career advisors are stuck being well, career advisors and also miserable - so they decide that they want to ruin the chances of others being successful.
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    (Original post by jabed786)
    Lol, I bet there is some sort of conspiracy - the career advisors are stuck being well, career advisors and also miserable - so they decide that they want to ruin the chances of others being successful.
    Better than everyone having degrees in ******* economics. Knowing the worth of everything and the value of nothing.
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    Would doing an MA in English Literature be useful at all?
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    (Original post by dalek2009)
    Would doing an MA in English Literature be useful at all?
    Too vague yet again. It won't get you far if you want to be a pharmacist for example. :confused:
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    If its relevant to the employment sector you're going into, yes.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    I wish I had your careers advisor. Mine told me to do a degree in media studies.
    Your career advisor must hate you.:woo:
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    (Original post by arkbar)
    Better than everyone having degrees in ******* economics. Knowing the worth of everything and the value of nothing.
    Could you elaborate more on the last part of the thread. I am an economics student myself. I am due to graduate next year. If you know something solid based on facts speak out but if not just shut up and don't mislead ppl as the person above has been done by his/her career advisor.

    Hope did not sound rude there.
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    (Original post by she)
    My careers advisor says that a non-vocational masters won't help me become more employable. Is that right?
    In my experience, most careers advisors are ******* idiots.
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    (Original post by mezitli)
    Could you elaborate more on the last part of the thread. I am an economics student myself. I am due to graduate next year. If you know something solid based on facts speak out but if not just shut up and don't mislead ppl as the person above has been done by his/her career advisor.

    Hope did not sound rude there.
    Don't worry, you did sound rude. I just don't like economists very much as they're often avaricious little *****.
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    I just don't like economists very much as they're often avaricious little *****.
    Care to explain the avarice in working for a central central bank or government economic service (i.e. being a civil servant) forgoing 50% or more of the salary that could be earned in the private sector. Not to mention the importance to society of ensuring price & financial stability (ensuring we don't have inflation like Zimbabwe and that the banking system can survive so that people & businesses who deserve them can still get loans and our economy doesn't collapse - which would result in misery for millions)

    Better than everyone having degrees in ******* economics. Knowing the worth of everything and the value of nothing.
    Worth and value are synonyms. You didn't even get that trite, non-sensical soundbite correct - Fail.
    You meant to say 'Knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing' lol

    This phrase doesn't mean anything btw, here's why:
    Value = subjective personal decision (i.e. what YOU would pay/do for something)
    Price = an aggregation of everyone's value of something determined in a (free) market using money as a means of exchange.

    Price can be measured easily and doesn't vary across individuals (e.g. "How much does this cost?" , "£5", "Thanks" ) value can't be easily measured as it's different for everyone (e.g. "£5, rip off!" or "£5, wow bargin!" )

    Maybe you should try forming your arguments on knowledge rather than prejudice.

    I hope this sounded as rude as your quoted comments.
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    To the OP. A lot depends on what job you want to do when you finish all your education. Some jobs (not many, but they still exist) will require a masters as a minimum, for others it may help (so it will depend on if you think getting it is worth the money for a small boost up the career ladder or a better chance at interview), others (the vast majority) don't require a masters at all.

    Why don't you ask potential employers (assuming you know roughly what you want to do)? They'll know a lot more than any careers advisor ever could.

    If you don't have a clue what you want to do, now might be a good time to try and come up with a plan so you don't waste time or money. Masters aren't cheap, you want to make sure you're doing the right thing for your career (and that you love the subject).
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    Can depend on the country where you're seeking employment too. In England, I was doing so badly when looking for jobs (despite two good degrees, plenty of work experience and extra-curriculars etc etc) that it appears that I may as well not have bothered with a postgraduate degree. However, in France, they couldn't employ me fast enough...so who knows?!
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    I have been offered a chance of doing an MA in English Literature but it is part-time and runs for two years. My fees can be waivered for it but I wanted to do a PGCE but I am awaiting the results of a GCSE Maths course. Do you think its wise doing the MA English for two years before re-applying and will it help at all?
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    (Original post by dalek2009)
    I have been offered a chance of doing an MA in English Literature
    Do it if you think you will enjoy it and that the enjoyment will be worth 2 years of tuition fees and lost income. Dont expect it to make you more employable.
 
 
 
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