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Confused - do I count as an international student? Watch

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    if you study in m'sia british uni(means the uni link with british uni),u will be a international student.
    i am M'sian ^^
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    (Original post by python38)
    I'm a British citizen, have been born in the UK, and have lived there for nearly all my life. However, this month I moved to Malaysia with my mum (who's my guardian) and may be living there for a while, at least till the end of this year. It's apparently quite easy to live in Malaysia for a while, even if you're from overseas.

    If I apply to British universities, will I count as an international applicant? And will I have to pay the international fees?
    no.
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    (Original post by python38)
    I'm a British citizen, have been born in the UK, and have lived there for nearly all my life. However, this month I moved to Malaysia with my mum (who's my guardian) and may be living there for a while, at least till the end of this year. It's apparently quite easy to live in Malaysia for a while, even if you're from overseas.

    If I apply to British universities, will I count as an international applicant? And will I have to pay the international fees?
    You'll have to look more into this (UKCISA:http://www.ukcosa.org.uk/student/fee...t_support.php), but I think one of the conditions for home fee status is that you must be resident in the UK 6 months before the start of the 1st day of term. Look it up at the link; it has everything.

    There have been many many cases where UK citizens living abroad have had to pay International Fees to come back to UK universities. I hope this isn't the case for you, but don't be too alarmed if it is; a gap year in the UK should do the trick.
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    Oops, I just saw that it's 3 years, not 6 months. But still read through it all; there might be a loop hole.
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    (Original post by python38)
    So, even if I stay in Malaysia till next January, next June or next September, I'll still count as a home applicant? That is to say, you're a home applicant if you're a British citizen, regardless of where you live or how long you've been living there?
    No. Look at this site (http://www.ukcisa.org.uk/student/inf...#tuition_fees). Your eligibility for UK funding and fees is dependent entirely on your residential status - three years residing in the UK is required immediately prior to the course starting. You have probably have lost your UK status by moving abroad (unless you are there temporarily and can prove it).
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    (Original post by SMed)
    a gap year in the UK should do the trick.
    It won't. A gap year (of twelve months duration) is not the necessary three years contunuous residence.
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    Oh, I just saw that you've only been there a month. You still have time to keep your UK residential status. 1 month shouldn't be enough to break residency. I was in the US for over 3 months from the March before I started Uni and I kept my home status.

    Contact your unis to let them know what you're doing and how you can keep your home status; the unis decide your fee status. But you'll also have to prove your status to your council as they decide whether or not to give you a student loan. But still, the amount you pay is determined by the university so make sure to be in contact with them. If they tell you your fee status could be in jeopardy, then listen to them.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    It won't. A gap year (of twelve months duration) is not the necessary three years contunuous residence.
    I know, I corrected myself the very next post after I said that. I was reading the site before I saw your post above.

    I just went through this whole process last year as my status was questionable. I read every possible piece of literature on this subject as I almost had to fight for my home status. I just have forgotten a lot of it since then!
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    (Original post by python38)
    I've only been here since the 4th, which is around two weeks - is my permanent residence already broken? (I haven't moved into where my family was considering living permanently yet, though...)
    That link I posted indicated that if you move abroad UK residence is broken instantly (and it does sound as if your family has moved abroad permanently and only then thought about the implications for your education).

    But we are not the people to advise you about interpretation of the law and the rules. Talk to Student Finance England.
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    Yes, talk to an official body.

    But do you have any links to the UK? Other parents, family members, family property, school? How did you go about moving to Malaysia? Did you get a 1 way ticket, what kind of visa did you use, was it a visitor's visa?
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    Like I said, the most important people you want to be on your side is your University. They and only they, decide how much they want for tuition fees. You want them on your side and you want to keep them informed. If you have anyway of coming back to the UK to live, then I would NOT tell them that you have MOVED to Malaysia. Tell them that you are in Malaysia, but find out how long you can stay before they consider you to no longer be resident. Simply being in another country does not break residency, otherwise no one would take holidays. But you must prove to them that it wasn't permanent and that you have strong ties to the UK, like a property and utility bills, bank statements etc. If you have completely severed all those ties, then it could get tricky.

    I've already given more advice than I should have perhaps, but first see what your university says.

    Student Finance decide whether you get a loan. They are more strict than the universities, and usually want more specific details. But even if they decide that you don't qualify for home status, you can still pay home fees if your university declares you as a home student. It just would mean that you would have to pay the uni directly and up front per year/term. This is what happened to me. My uni said home, Student Finance said NO; so I didn't get the loan and I just pay the school directly.

    But my case is completely different to yours and much more complicated so it's not helpful to compare.
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    (Original post by python38)
    Unfortunately, I got a 1-way ticket. However, my older brother, my father, and my older sister and her husband (who are both adults) both live in the UK. I'm also home-schooled, so I can study just about anywhere.

    The reason for my moving was that both my other older brother and my mum (who is single, and my legal guardian - I won't be 16 till next January) wanted to set up a business here. As far as I know, they both want to stay here permanently. But, if I think it will jeopardize my chances of being able to pay the home fees, I will have to go home and stay with my sister.
    I thought you were just about to start uni.

    If you move back with your family in the UK, you should be fine. That should make it relatively straight-forward (unless I'm overlooking something). Can't you stay with your father? When you move back to the UK, make sure you've got records that you've been living there for the time up to the start of university. Being home-schooled may make that slightly more difficult but if you're registered to a GP, that should be taken care of.

    One good thing I can see from being home schooled is that you can prove that education is not a main reason to be living in the UK; that and your father lives here.
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    None of those places is likely to be open over the weekend, obviously.
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    (Original post by python38)
    Fortunately, Student Finance is:

    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Dl1/Dire...acts/DG_172310

    Obviously, I need to call them ASAP. But what should I tell them - I mean, how should I say that I've come here? Should I just say I'm on holiday, or tell the truth, which is that I'm not sure how long I'll be staying and I came because my legal guardian was moving to this country?
    Just keep it hypothetical. Say "I'm a UK citizen but my family want to move to Malaysia. Will I be counted as a home or international student?"

    That should answer your question. I'm pretty sure they'll say you'd be an international student though....
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    I would email EVERYONE. That way you've got written physical evidence. Make one general email with all the details, and copy it to as many schools as you want. Email is probably better for this. List as many questions as you can think of.

    Find out about making your sister your legal guardian, it should be okay I hope; but I don't know 100%.
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    I'd tell them the truth and get as full an explanation and as close to the actual likely outcome as possible. You aren't actually applying now, just wanting to discover what theri likely decision might be. A full investigation is likely to happen eventually anyway and it would be more helpful to you to find out the actual situation early rather than at the last minute (perhaps when you are already committed).
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    (Original post by python38)
    I'll email all the universities - should I use my normal email address (which contains my full name) or make a new one? And I can't email Student Finance, only phone them - so should I ask them similiar questions to what I ask the universities?



    I'll look into this.
    Why are you so concerned about the minutiae of what email address to use? Why have a new email address just for this?
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    (Original post by james99)
    Just keep it hypothetical. Say "I'm a UK citizen but my family want to move to Malaysia. Will I be counted as a home or international student?"
    I would do this too. Probably no need to change emails.
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    Obviously it's better to actually look this up, but when I was applying 3 years ago I was living abroad. It was in Europe, so that may have had an impact. Anyway, most of my friends were counted as EU status as they were British, but had not lived in Britain for the required time. So they paid the same fees as British students, but they didn't get the loans or grants. I imagine if you remained in Malaysia, this will be the case for you. However, because I could prove that my family had no choice moving oversees, I could qualify for the loans. You may be able to get this, but there are specific requirements.
 
 
 
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