Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

The Adonis Challenge | Finals. watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mark Rippetoe)
    Is that supposed to be an ID guess?
    yes.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    a believer in lower weights perfect form and isolation but ill give it a go. would like to see wide arm pull ups tho theirs the dogs balls
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by burningnun)
    yes.
    Wrong.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Adonis)
    20kg for 10 reps

    but that'd be alternating curls.
    Yeah.. I can do about half that... :o:
    Only just started going to the gym though..

    Working hard on my biceps do you think I could reach something like that in 3 months, or will it take much longer?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Isn't 50% BW a bit heavy for curls? 40% for the second lot of dips too. Why incline press and not flat, because you're good at it? Double BW deadlift for reps is too heavy imo, there aren't many of us doing above that and most only at 5ish reps.

    Might have a go at some stuff if it falls in with my routine, but not going to go out of my way to if it's going to impact PBs. Standard lifts are pretty boring though. Might as well just look in each other's logs to see who's lifting what. Spice it up a bit, throw in some hard as ****/different stuff that no one usually does.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Brotherhood)
    Isn't 50% BW a bit heavy for curls? 40% for the second lot of dips too. Why incline press and not flat, because you're good at it? Double BW deadlift for reps is too heavy imo, there aren't many of us doing above that and most only at 5ish reps.

    Might have a go at some stuff if it falls in with my routine, but not going to go out of my way to if it's going to impact PBs. Standard lifts are pretty boring though. Might as well just look in each other's logs to see who's lifting what. Spice it up a bit, throw in some hard as ****/different stuff that no one usually does.
    Yes. lol

    & well I'm open to suggestions - suggest away
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    What is the point of the incline press if there is no touch or lockout, thats just homo imo
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    And Deadlifts with bounced reps, does than not suggest anything in the form to you guys
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    What is the point of the incline press if there is no touch or lockout, thats just homo imo
    I bring to neck on presses so it puts too much strain on joints if i bring it down any lower

    and I just never fully lock out like 1-2" short cos u can contract ur chest without fully locking out

    I could change my personal style but TBH it's harder not to lock out than to
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    And Deadlifts with bounced reps, does than not suggest anything in the form to you guys
    BB'ers don't always deload the weight

    i've seen massive guys in my gym who are 300kg+ pullers do it that way and they taught me and i just prefer it that way

    they don't always bounce it, but they don't also fully deload either
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Adonis)
    I bring to neck on presses so it puts too much strain on joints if i bring it down any lower

    and I just never fully lock out like 1-2" short cos u can contract ur chest without fully locking out

    I could change my personal style but TBH it's harder not to lock out than to
    What has contracting the chest got to do with a rep challenge?

    Its harder to lock out, it uses more energy and more range with a greater weight, the newtons used in transit are far greater and when talking of reps it will be the triceps that fatigue first.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Adonis)
    BB'ers don't always deload the weight

    i've seen massive guys in my gym who are 300kg+ pullers do it that way and they taught me and i just prefer it that way

    they don't always bounce it, but they don't also fully deload either
    If its not to a dead stop it is not a deadlift, its akin to bouncing the weight off your chest on a bench or squatting high, many people can pull much more if they cheat but the fact of the matter is it is dangerous, a bounce deloads tension from the biceps and then on the ascent multiples the force by around 1.4 times due to load following loss of inertia, this is how people tear thier biceps.

    I hear so many times of all these 300+ pullers, fact of the matter is there are not a huge number of people who can do that in the country (unless you mean pounds) so you'll forgive me for not being overly impressed, especially as bodybuilders are supposd to focus on form etc and Dorian Yates didn't pull 300kg
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    PL, strong physics: You haz it
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    If its not to a dead stop it is not a deadlift, its akin to bouncing the weight off your chest on a bench or squatting high, many people can pull much more if they cheat but the fact of the matter is it is dangerous, a bounce deloads tension from the biceps and then on the ascent multiples the force by around 1.4 times due to load following loss of inertia, this is how people tear thier biceps.

    I hear so many times of all these 300+ pullers, fact of the matter is there are not a huge number of people who can do that in the country (unless you mean pounds) so you'll forgive me for not being overly impressed, especially as bodybuilders are supposd to focus on form etc and Dorian Yates didn't pull 300kg
    lol, I meant kilo's and I've seen 3 do it in real life who were BB'ers and not PL'ers

    7 plates on each side, and it was for a single rep

    they usually stuck to 5-6 plates for reps

    and it wasn't so much bounced, as it was..just not fully deloaded which was more of what I was leaning towards, like it was a very light/quick pause on the floor before pulling, VS waiting 1-2s before going onto the next rep

    BTW whilst I have your attention, ... could you check my deadlift form for me?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eV8c5jD-FQE

    not a maximal set, that's 145 I went up to 175 on that day I think

    don't wanna be pulling a bicep anytime soon

    thanks
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    What has contracting the chest got to do with a rep challenge?

    Its harder to lock out, it uses more energy and more range with a greater weight, the newtons used in transit are far greater and when talking of reps it will be the triceps that fatigue first.
    as TAD said, awesome physics lol

    ok... maybe the workload is more

    i guess it's harder in different ways

    not locking out I find harder purely because of the constant tension on the chest

    I do tend to lock out on lower-reps mind, like when doing 5-8 reps, just to give myself a mini-break between reps
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Adonis)
    lol, I meant kilo's and I've seen 3 do it in real life who were BB'ers and not PL'ers

    7 plates on each side, and it was for a single rep

    they usually stuck to 5-6 plates for reps

    and it wasn't so much bounced, as it was..just not fully deloaded which was more of what I was leaning towards, like it was a very light/quick pause on the floor before pulling, VS waiting 1-2s before going onto the next rep

    BTW whilst I have your attention, ... could you check my deadlift form for me?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eV8c5jD-FQE

    not a maximal set, that's 145 I went up to 175 on that day I think

    don't wanna be pulling a bicep anytime soon

    thanks
    There si no need to wait a set time, just ensure the weight is dead stopped hence deadlifting as you have to generate dead stop force which is harder and recruits more muscle fiber than elastic tenstion which not fully deloading will do.

    Your hips are pretty high, especially if this is a light weight set, it indicates a lack of leg and hip strength. There is also no need to 'drop back' as it were, stand staight and locked out is fine but overly leaning back is not very clever and can cause damage.

    As your hips are high you don't get much drive into the lift which means you asre robbing your back of weight.

    you will find lifters who lift as you do, but not with the same proportions, lifting like that is usually reserved for those with longer legs (in relation to thier torso). You should aim to sit back more and do it more as a single movement rather than 2 phases ( I don't pretend to be perfect form either)
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Well if there's constant tension there's more time under tension, which I can understand adds to the difficulty of a lift.

    Regarding deadlifts, I can see the theory behind 'bouncing': The eccentric (lowering) portion of the lifting is vital and most important for stimulating hypertrophy (this is demonstrated extremely well in the research literature). The force velocity relationship of skeletal muscle says that we are weaker on concentric (lifting) and stronger on eccentric (lowering) portions. You can lower a heavier weight than you can lift up - this is simply a function of the manner in which skeletal muscle works. Given the above, it follows that you'd want to lift a given load such that you make things easier on the concentric (lifting up) when you're weaker so that you're using as heavy a load as possible on the eccentric portion when the muscle is stronger and you're performing the part of the rep that's most important for muscle growth.

    It all comes down to Newton's third law: Force applied on a body is directly proportional to the rate of change of momentum of the body. Or, Force = Mass X Acceleration. On the concentric part of the lift you generate maximal muscular tension (force) by using a heavy weight accelerated as fast as you can. However, on the eccentric this is slightly reversed in that you generate maximal muscular tension when the load is lowered as slow as possible.

    You can lower more than you can lift up and 'bouncing' enables you to overload the eccentric portion more than proper strict reps (this is why you see bodybuilders often using a bit of 'body English' on their lifts) and in the context of hypertrophy the eccentric portion is the most important.

    But that's just theory for bodybuilders, and isn't really important at all for like 99% of lifters who would still be bigger if they lifted more weight and ate more damned food. In reality I've never seen a skinny person who ate a lot of food and deadlifted a lot of weight, bounced or proper form.

    For a powerlifting competition you are not asked to do reps on the deadlift, and you need as much off the floor strength as possible, hence why powerlifters generally do sets of singles rather than bounced reps immediately after each other.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    info.
    intelesting

    i shall take that on board.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'd be interesting to see how much a powerlifter could do for a barbell front raise
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    How are people meant to prove this? I'm assuming videos will be needed otherwise we could say anything.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

This forum is supported by:
Updated: July 26, 2009
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.