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Is getting a first bad for getting jobs? Watch

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    I have a first from Warwick and it's always been advantageous in terms of getting jobs. Some people are a bit arsey with you when they find you have one (and given that you don't go round telling everyone your degree result, it's always people who actually seek the information who have a problem with it!) but they're just insecure or something and their opinion about you isn't really worth much.
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    (Original post by dsch)
    Glancing at the first page of his recent posts it looks like Roehampton, which I haven't heard of.
    Her Do blokes usually give themselves flowery usernames?
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    (Original post by Paeony)
    Her Do blokes usually give themselves flowery usernames?
    Oh! Sorry. There are all sorts on the internet...
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    (Original post by philip67)
    It actually can, if you have no social skills or communication/team work skills, employers do look for more than just education levels.
    If you are an absolute geek who can't communicate, you are no use to anyone.

    But

    If you have a first, but can talk to people, and understand the idea of a social life, then you are fine.
    part time job. done.....
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    my example was only what I got told, as like extreme cases for people who were really clever, but socialy inept. So neg rep was uncalled for, and well done to everyone who has a first, and I hope you do really well and get a lovely career!
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    I don't know what's stupider. People with no real world experience - or perhaps even a first - being total hypocrites and dissing the OP, or people who have completely ignored Paeony's post which actually proves the OP's point...
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    I'm using my com in office and I can assure you that here are 11 people laughing over my shoulder this very moment. If the job states that you're over-qualified, then I'd say that you are indeed better off seeking better jobs that can better justify your worth
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    Yes it may if your applying for jobs that require much less qualifications.
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    Yeah, regardless of whether this was trolling or not it actually can happen. Employers often think that people with very good qualifications are only going to stay in a particular job for a short time before they move on to a better one, so don't bother hiring them in the first place and wasting resources training them only to have to go through it all again in a few months, I know someone who was told this up front when she applied for a (admittedly low level) job.

    Even lecturers will admit that there's such a thing as a thick 1st class student (who spends all day and night in the library working crazy hard just to keep up) and a clever 1st class student (who actually has a life and ends uni with a respectable amount of liver damage). This is why interviews are so important as they show which you are and serve to dispell the myths of being arrogant and know it all (although I've met a worryingly large minority of 1st-ers who match the stereotype so well they could be in a cheesy 80's movie).
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    I think it's only 'bad' if a student has studied hard at the expense of gaining relevant work experience.
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    It depends on the job, if you wanted to become a lecturer for example, a first would be beneficial.
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    (Original post by !Borek)
    It depends on the job, if you wanted to become a lecturer for example, a first would be beneficial.
    Or if you wanted to do a post-grad qualification. e.g. phd.
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    The whole social thing pisses me off. I like going out with friends and having a laugh, enjoying a drink etc etc, but because i don't get involved with organised stuff like societies i won't have much to put on a cv in that way unless i start going to something. I suppose putting, "i'm very social, i haven't joined rag society but i've knocked back pints and hit the dancefloor", won't cut it.

    Why is it that to not be socially inept, one has to join a load of societies just to prove you are social? Someone could have loads of friends and go out to lots of places with them, but because they can't say they've joined some club it means they're socially inept.
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    (Original post by Xang Lee)
    Or if you wanted to do a post-grad qualification. e.g. phd.
    That's kind of on the way to becoming a lecturer :p:
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    (Original post by AdamWalsh)
    Oh Dear Oh Dear!!! Some people on this furum (control yourself control yourself Adam!)... :yes:
    offtopic, but which offer have you firmed?
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    (Original post by Smtn)
    offtopic, but which offer have you firmed?
    Law in Queens? Why? Have you offers there? :yes:
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    (Original post by AdamWalsh)
    Law in Queens? Why? Have you offers there? :yes:
    No, wondered if you firmed aston
 
 
 
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