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    It's a perfectly decent university for law- ranked 27th on the times online apparently, a nice red brick with a good reputation. When I spoke to some lawyers they recommended Manchester, among others. But I don't know how much of a safety it is when it still asks for AAA, consistently? Do check beforehand about your lack of GCSEs, wherever you apply. Is there no way you can just fit five in throughout your A Levels? They'd be incredibly easy for you.
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    (Original post by python38)
    I'll first finish checking whether all the universities on my list accept American qualifications, but, if they have some kind of quota for GCSEs that everyone has to fulfill, I may do some.

    How highly did the lawyers you spoke to recommend Manchester (sorry, I don't know whether that makes sense)? If it's a good university for law, law might also be a hard course to get in.
    They told me it as important that if you wanted to do well in law you would have had to have gone to a good university. They said that especially for commercial, business law etc, it was important that you had good lecturers, and this usually deemed which universities were good, in the eyes of those I spoke too. They said obviously Oxbridge and strangely enough they liked Birmingham a lot. This was followed by - as they described it - 'the red bricks from up north' such as Newcastle, Manchester and Durham. At around the same level were Bristol and Exeter. They didn't have much to say about the London universities strangely, but they seemed to like KCL and LSE the best.

    However, this was just a couple of lawyers in one firm. Whilst they do recruit the graduates, I'm sure their opinion does not speak on behalf of all lawyers. They also said that their rankings would change if you were interested in other types of law, like criminal would have a different ranking system, as would international, European, constitutional etc
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    (Original post by python38)
    I'm afraid I don't know much about different types of law (or the subject generally). What little I've learned about the subject/career from the Web appeals to me, but is there any book or something you'd recommend that would help me get a basic idea, at least, of the subject?
    Absolutely
    Definitely read 'What about law?' By Virgo, O'Sullivan and Barnard. It gives an introduction into what law is, and the type of activities undertaken by any law student. Then it goes into detail of several core areas of law, exploring what they are about and how they apply to a case example. I couldn't recommend a book any higher, it is really good.

    I'm also reading 'Discovering the Law' edited by Sean Butler - this gives a brief introduction to the types of law that can be studied.

    'The Law Machine' - this gives an in depth explanation of how law works in our legal system, and the concept of justice, and the roles of people who work in the law

    'Learning the Law' - Glanville Williams - this gives an exploration into how law is studied as a discipline, how to use cases, where the law comes from - a truly insightful book, which many academics recommend


    After this, you may feel compelled to look into a topic further, and read around it. The main ones that you may want to research are - Tort, Contract, Criminal, Equity and Trusts, Property, Public, Roman, Constitutional, EU, Land, Family and Jurisprudence. That lists includes the seven foundation subjects needed for a qualifying law degree (one that lets you practice as a barrister or solicitor) and a few other commonly studied areas which will appear either as a compulsory or optional module at most universities.

    In addition to this, if you check out most of the websites for the Cambridge Colleges, and look for the Law subject notes, there will be a list of their recommended reading. The most commonly listed are mentioned above, but there will be others.

    Hope this is helpful. Feel free to PM if you need anything else
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    (Original post by python38)
    I'm busy choosing which universities to apply to this autumn; I already have Cambridge, Warwick and LSE on my list, and I'm looking for a "safety" university I'll be sure to get into. I have three A-levels (Maths, Further Maths, and Physics), all As (but no GCSEs - I'm homeschooled).

    Would Manchester be considered a "safety" university for me? And how good is it for Law?
    Manchester is my firm conditional for Law this year! I have spoken to lawyers who have recommended it aswell
    Also, I've done 3 A-levels (and 1 AS), and went to an American school till I was 16 so I have no GCSEs either, they didnt even question it whereas a couple of others did! x
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    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...cle6301614.ece
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    It is wonderful.
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    has a good reputation but in the City I have found its reputation to be mingled amongst many other unis I didnt consider to be as good. Aside from that - the administration of the law department could really do with some regigging.
 
 
 
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