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    (Original post by oblivious)
    I did work last weekend. Will probably do some this weekend.

    Been doing 6.30am till 8pm recently. Once you go the gym and get home, you go to bed. Strong work/life balance.

    Ouch mate, your lead must be making you work v. hard.

    I refuse to get in before 7, and generally leave by 6. When I'm writing a note, I put in some later hours or doss around a bit on the weekend, but generally, no more than 55 hrs per week.
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    (Original post by TOTB)
    Hi mate, just one more question.

    I've heard that being chained to your Blackberry is a common feature when you are equity research analyst, i.e. weekend work, more and more research and so forth.

    Is that something you need to accept as part of the job?
    You are 'chained' to work with or without a blackberry in equities. If you have an interest, you'll find yourself watching CNBC when you shouldn't and reading books on the great depression for fun. If you enjoy your work, then even your leisure time can be consumed by work related thoughts.

    BBerry is bad for M&A - those guys are chained. That doesn't happen in ER
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    (Original post by rboogie)
    You are 'chained' to work with or without a blackberry in equities. If you have an interest, you'll find yourself watching CNBC when you shouldn't and reading books on the great depression for fun. If you enjoy your work, then even your leisure time can be consumed by work related thoughts.

    BBerry is bad for M&A - those guys are chained. That doesn't happen in ER
    From what you've said above, that sounds absolutely fine to me. I mean I watch Bloomberg pretty much twice or three times a day (Deirdre Bolton is a fittie), depending on how much time I have. Reading books is absolutely fine as well, I've just finished Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits (definitely an equity research type of book).

    It sounds cheesy, but I am actually interested in this stuff and my main goal is to become a top class equity analyst, and possibly a portfolio manager afterwards. More importantly, I want to make money for myself! I have money in equity markets right now, so it'll be interesting to see what happens to my portfolio in the next few years.

    I actually do not mind evening work and the occasional weekend (I think!), but at the same time, I'd like to enjoy my spare time and relax my brain as well, just like any other human being.:cool: After all, a extra zero in a equity research report can make a massive difference, so rest is kind of important.
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    (Original post by rboogie)
    This is VERY interesting. Anyone with this kind of experience is shocking/suprising for a prospective grad.

    So, why did you decide to invest your own money?

    I would suggest making some contacts on the buyside with this experience - plenty will take a look at you - try doing the CFA level one - that would really help your case.
    Honestly, mate, I invest because it's fun. Profits are just a bonus.

    Well it's a long story, but prior to university, I took 2 unplanned gap years, where one year consisted of working full-time, and during work breaks I just started reading books about how to manage your money, personal finance, planning your retirement etc. It's amazing what you'll read to keep your mind occupied at times!

    Anyhoo, from there I started looking at cash, shares and bonds and took a particular liking to stocks, so I started reading books on shares. From there, I started looking at fundamental/tech analysis, and felt that fundamentals suited my personality a lot more (and made a lot more sense!). From there, I've read various books including work by Graham, Lynch and recently, Fisher.

    And to back all the crap I've read I thought I'd put my money where my mouth is and have invested in a few companies in the FTSE 100. I've actually waited for a recession/bear market to make my purchases (very Buffett/Grahamesque), so the recession has not hurt everyone.:cool: At the present moment, I'm sitting on paper profits, but that could all change tomorrow, so I don't want to blow my trumpet just yet.

    btw, I'm a science undergraduate, so I've only done the above because I find it interesting. I have nothing to gain from it in an academic sense.

    Regarding contacts: Do you have any idea where I can start? I don't want to make excuses, but I come from a poor background and have zero contacts when it comes to family/friends working in the City. Do you suggest that I start phoning up buy side asset managers? Or even better, show up on the day? Wouldn't these guys be really busy, though?

    If you're not comfortable answering these questions on TSR, you can PM me if it suits you better? Cheers.
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    (Original post by rboogie)
    This is VERY interesting. Anyone with this kind of experience is shocking/suprising for a prospective grad.

    So, why did you decide to invest your own money?
    Really? When I was applying for internships I generally left it out of my CV (including for Redburn, rejected surprise surprise but time to reapply next year after a placement year :P) partly due to some posters on this forum saying that a mock portfolio would be detrimental in most cases (basically I consider it "mock money" to an extent even though it's real because it's mostly used for "playing around" and "learning" by doing)

    How do you include something like that in your CV? (ie. not necessarily 40k but 5 figures anyhow)

    And as you might know, with investing there's a bit of a learning curve... I always sounded really stupid talking about my first investments even though I emphasised that I'd learned. How do you get around that problem in interviews?
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    oh and unlike the OP, I am not sitting on paper profits. Infact I'm sitting on massive (about equal to the benchmark) losses. Just talk about the experience or embellish your investment record?
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    Traders will laugh at your spreadsheet portfolios which are constructed and managed like... landfill sites in India.

    Boogie is somewhat unique in seemingly liking someone who punts when punting takes place with an expectation not to outperform.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Traders will laugh at your spreadsheet portfolios which are constructed and managed like... landfill sites in India.

    Boogie is somewhat unique in seemingly liking someone who punts when punting takes place with an expectation not to outperform.
    India is basically one giant landfill or that's what it seems like (on an unrelated note)

    And I know what you're saying and it makes sense but on the other hand my CV is pretty thin as it is... could it hurt to stick something there? (about real money and 5 years, not fake portfolio and two months or whatever)

    My personal opinion is that it's not much of an achievement but it's driven me to take much more of an interest in finance from a fairly young age in some ways. But sticking it on the CV, people tend to focus on the investment part and ask you why you bought your first stock or whatever instead of focusing on the results of the investing.

    Also if I recall the City Uni panel event properly, Anjool also seemed to recommend putting the fake portfolio on the CV...
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Traders will laugh at your spreadsheet portfolios which are constructed and managed like... landfill sites in India.

    Boogie is somewhat unique in seemingly liking someone who punts when punting takes place with an expectation not to outperform.
    Hi, mate.

    Well, my portfolio is approx. 70% equities, 30% bonds. If markets go lower than in March, I will increase my equity exposure. I can go into more detail, but I don't feel comfortable talking about this on a public forum. I have no objection discussing this over a PM or whatever.

    As of yet, I am outperforming the FTSE 100 over a four year basis (I'm sitting on about a 15%ish return atm with my money that's still in the market, not including money I've made and lost before). I am also aware that in time, I might underperform the main benchmarks, so we'll see what happens. But right now, I'm up vs. FTSE 100. And yes, I am aware of how big an "achievement" (if you want to call it that) this is considering most mutual funds miserably underperform the main benchmarks.

    Who knows, I might be a lucky POS. But I don't think it's all luck in my case.

    I am not claiming to be some whizzkid, just learning, simple as.
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    (Original post by TOTB)
    Hi, mate.

    Well, my portfolio is approx. 70% equities, 30% bonds. If markets go lower than in March, I will increase my equity exposure. I can go into more detail, but I don't feel comfortable talking about this on a public forum. I have no objection discussing this over a PM or whatever.

    As of yet, I am outperforming the FTSE 100 over a four year basis (I'm sitting on about a 15%ish return atm with my money that's still in the market, not including money I've made and lost before). I am also aware that in time, I might underperform the main benchmarks, so we'll see what happens. But right now, I'm up vs. FTSE 100. And yes, I am aware of how big an "achievement" (if you want to call it that) this is considering most mutual funds miserably underperform the main benchmarks.

    Who knows, I might be a lucky POS. But I don't think it's all luck in my case.

    I am not claiming to be some whizzkid, just learning, simple as.
    Hmm, that is a good allocation. And some solid return for you. You defintely would be an interesting candidate - however your background may impact you as more and more firms are delineating towards the oxbridge candidate - which to be honest I think is a poor strategy for those firms.

    In your case, I would do the CFA level one and start going to recruitment events to meet people and discuss your portfolio. You only mentioned this in the third paragrah and luckily I had a passing glance - most people won't read to the third paragraph. I would suggest putting that RIGHT at the top of your CV and really letting people know about this. I really like candidates like this who have a genuine passion for the market and are absorbed by it - they tend to be the best hires over time in my opinion.

    Let me know how you get on.
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    (Original post by Teenage Pirate)
    India is basically one giant landfill or that's what it seems like (on an unrelated note)

    And I know what you're saying and it makes sense but on the other hand my CV is pretty thin as it is... could it hurt to stick something there? (about real money and 5 years, not fake portfolio and two months or whatever)

    My personal opinion is that it's not much of an achievement but it's driven me to take much more of an interest in finance from a fairly young age in some ways. But sticking it on the CV, people tend to focus on the investment part and ask you why you bought your first stock or whatever instead of focusing on the results of the investing.

    Also if I recall the City Uni panel event properly, Anjool also seemed to recommend putting the fake portfolio on the CV...
    No definitely, I really like people who invest - but don't do it if you're not good - because you will get caught out badly. I had one applicant tell me this and I quizzed him on it and he flaked badly. He was not invited back.

    Only do this if you're serious about investing and are passionate about the market - it is so rare to find this in applicants but also I understand that it's difficult to know about the markets beforehand. I remember growing up and always wondering about the movement of the dow and where the canadian dollar would go etc. It was a passing interest, but the spawn of some sort of interest nonetheless.

    Ultimately, I (and many other people in the city) need to see passion from an applicant. it doesn't have to be investing, but has to be something - and that's the more important quality I look for in an applicant. Some of the flakes we've hired with impeccable CV's are now struggling because they lack this quality.
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    Ability and enthusiasm are in general, the criteria for success at a job/task.

    You ought to be able to show you track and understand the basics of markets - to the extent that sales/research understand inter-relations, by actually paying attention, rather than punting a portfolio.

    Your cash management, volatility, cross correlation risks, frequency of reallocation, effective exposure or lack thereof to fx, yield curves/duration and so forth... are probably things and count as simple reasons why your portfolio is more punting than serious.
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    Hi guys, this is an interesting discussion going on and I am in a similar position. I run a fake fund of about 20 stocks, all US based companies, selected from buy list of 100 companies. This buy list is based on the top 100 brands in the US according to Interbrand, a consultancy specialising in brand valuations. I was wondering whether or not to include this on my CV??? What is the general feeling about fake portfolios? Is it a waste of space on the CV or a good idea?

    My feeling is that while we might be able to beat the market running our own portfolios the reality is that most mutual fund managers work under such restrictive mandates that it is almost impossible for them to act in a way which would allow them to do so. I almost feel that these funds want to train you to think and act their way, and not your way, and so maybe it is better to come accross as a blank canvas? On the other hand, I think building your own fund shows that you have the interest to put in the hours it takes to be a top quality equity analyst. Difficult call!
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    (Original post by BrianGretzky99)
    Hi guys, this is an interesting discussion going on and I am in a similar position. I run a fake fund of about 20 stocks, all US based companies, selected from buy list of 100 companies. This buy list is based on the top 100 brands in the US according to Interbrand, a consultancy specialising in brand valuations. I was wondering whether or not to include this on my CV??? What is the general feeling about fake portfolios? Is it a waste of space on the CV or a good idea?

    My feeling is that while we might be able to beat the market running our own portfolios the reality is that most mutual fund managers work under such restrictive mandates that it is almost impossible for them to act in a way which would allow them to do so. I almost feel that these funds want to train you to think and act their way, and not your way, and so maybe it is better to come accross as a blank canvas? On the other hand, I think building your own fund shows that you have the interest to put in the hours it takes to be a top quality equity analyst. Difficult call!
    Let me temper this - I don't suggest all of you do this - In the OP's post, he had good reason to flag his investing - yours does not seem as exciting, and potentially a bit worrying given your philosophy - this would be a negative for you.
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    The fact you can talk should mean you get on a spring programme.
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    (Original post by Teenage Pirate)
    India is basically one giant landfill or that's what it seems like (on an unrelated note)
    excuse me?!
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    (Original post by Prince of Zamunda)
    Right, but would I have been lucky enough to get the interviews if I didn't have that on my CV? When I gave you my CV to look at last year, I believe it was you who said

    "There'll be hundreds of applicants with CVs better than yours"

    or, perhaps you believe it was my Tesco work experience that sealed the deal for me.
    There were hundreds of people who did a Spring week type of thing too. You're not an idiot, unlike most of the forum. I'll reckon you didn't get a very high hit rate on your applications but the ones that advanced, you did well on.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    There were hundreds of people who did a Spring week type of thing too. You're not an idiot, unlike most of the forum. I'll reckon you didn't get a very high hit rate on your applications but the ones that advanced, you did well on.
    The guy did like every possible spring week...
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    (Original post by Prince of Zamunda)
    Don't listen to President_Ben

    There are many professionals out there who would be very interested in hearing about your investing.

    I put the JPM FX trading game on my CV, which was just a 2 week puntathon.

    It's come up in all of my interviews so far, and it hasn't hindered my chances at all. In fact, I'd say I landed my first spring week offers from being able to talk about it confidently.
    Yea but u had an amazing rate of return (3000%+ if I remember??, which definitely stands out even if it was just punting and so I would think it is completely different from getting a 15% return.

    In terms of putting the portfolio on the CV, I had it on a couple months ago but I realized that it could hurt you more than it can help you. An interviewer may see it and just decide to grill you on it. I also took it off cuz whatever your returns are now they are bound to change, nothing will be more **** as if you are flaunting a 15% return on ur CV and then when your interview comes you are down 15% (unless you lie in the interview of course)

    I cant talk about ER/sales, but I heard a trader say tht whenever they see this kind of thing on a cv, they shudder.

    However, if you feel you can talk about it in depth (and by in depth I mean having someone like President_Ben grill you on it and see if you come out alive) and you are going for ER and your CV is bare then I guess it wuld be good to put it on.
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    As a non-professional (hence my opinion is worthless :P), I would be more worried about 3000% returns than 15% returns because it sort of implies you took massive risks. If you understand that and can justify it as "well the only way you win these games is by taking massive risks" then I guess it works, but on the spreadbetting threads and everything people don't seem to understand that they're actually taking risk (BUT BUT BUT I HAVE A STOP LOSS) and I get the feeling that for every applicant who understands the risk behind 3000% returns there are 10 who don't..
 
 
 
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