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    We got Clayden free when we started uni (all out textbooks actually) and we get lectured by Clayden :yes: But seriously, don't read that until you're *at* uni. Something general and more usual book sized will help. A textbook won't really be of any use for you yet.
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    Don't read text books for God's sake! I'm going to apply for Biochemistry and have read 'Magic Molecules: How drugs work'. Its alright but is quite general and not focussed on the chemistry.

    Just read any chemistry-related Popular Science book. Search that.
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    (Original post by Hedgehunter)
    Don't read text books for God's sake!
    I don't think there's anything wrong with reading Why Chemical Reactions Happen — it seems (though I'm not far through it) to be good bridging material and also useful for understanding A level concepts more fully, too.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    I don't think there's anything wrong with reading Why Chemical Reactions Happen — it seems (though I'm not far through it) to be good bridging material and also useful for understanding A level concepts more fully, too.

    I don't have problem with that either as 'Why Chemical Reactions Happen' is not a traditional text book.

    (Though looking at it on Amazon it seems more of a reference book than Popular science books!)
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    My chemistry teacher recommended 'Molecules of Murder' by John Emsley after I went abroad, so sadly I couldn't buy the book in time. You might consider reading that?

    It`s not a chemistry textbook but it shows chemistry in real life and you never know, it might actually get you more excited about chemistry itself. Thats what they look for interviews and Personal Statements, passion for your subject?

    The reviews for the book on amazon are quite high as well
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    (Original post by She`Appears)
    My chemistry teacher recommended 'Molecules of Murder' by John Emsley after I went abroad, so sadly I couldn't buy the book in time. You might consider reading that?

    It`s not a chemistry textbook but it shows chemistry in real life and you never know, it might actually get you more excited about chemistry itself. Thats what they look for interviews and Personal Statements, passion for your subject?

    The reviews for the book on amazon are quite high as well
    That looks really cool actually: an excellent present! Its even quite recent and includes that Russian spy killed with Polonium-210!
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    lol claydon is a little heavy - for just the application sake I'd recommend ''Why Chemical Reactions Happen''
    Is "Why Chemical Reactions Happen" written for A-level students? I have the book, but I only understood the first chapter. The 2nd chapter confused me... a lot.

    I've just finished AS, and am currently preparing for A2 chemistry. I want to mention the book in my Personal Statement, but I'm having trouble understanding it. Do you think I should carry out struggling with it until it makes sense?
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    (Original post by KiraMayz)
    Is "Why Chemical Reactions Happen" written for A-level students? I have the book, but I only understood the first chapter. The 2nd chapter confused me... a lot.

    I've just finished AS, and am currently preparing for A2 chemistry. I want to mention the book in my Personal Statement, but I'm having trouble understanding it. Do you think I should carry out struggling with it until it makes sense?
    I guess it's really written for those who are just finishing their A-levels. Maybe just focus on one particular chapter, look up anything you don't know or ask someone that does
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    (Original post by ducky123)
    If your looking for something based on chemistry where your reading around the subject, it might be good not to read a textbook - so its something a little different from your school work. I went to a lecture by John Emsley, fell in love, and read his book called Elements of Murder. He has others too, that incorperate chemistry into real subjects, and theyre well written too.

    I wrote about it in my PS and all of my interviews involved them asking what I thought, and all seemed interests/ liked the change from just textbook readers. It just makes you a bit different.

    Good Luck with applying!
    I was gonna buy the Elements of Murder book, did you think it was good?

    I didn't read any books before I applied tbh. I tried getting some from my local library but I never ended up putting them in my PS and I ended up getting offers. I think it depends where you apply though
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    (Original post by KiraMayz)
    Is "Why Chemical Reactions Happen" written for A-level students? I have the book, but I only understood the first chapter. The 2nd chapter confused me... a lot.

    I've just finished AS, and am currently preparing for A2 chemistry. I want to mention the book in my Personal Statement, but I'm having trouble understanding it. Do you think I should carry out struggling with it until it makes sense?
    It's intended for post A-level students, typically first term at University level. However, it is good for you to read and try to understand the material and if you don't something I guess it's better if you go and ask your teachers at school.
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    (Original post by Jacqueline xo)
    I was gonna buy the Elements of Murder book, did you think it was good?
    I liked it - easy to pick up and put down, because its broken up into a few pages about particular evernts, some are quite funny really.

    Id say its worth a read, but not really useful for learning lots about the elements.
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    (Original post by PoisonDonna)
    We got Clayden free when we started uni (all out textbooks actually) and we get lectured by Clayden :yes: But seriously, don't read that until you're *at* uni. Something general and more usual book sized will help. A textbook won't really be of any use for you yet.
    Whoa... how much are we talking here?
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    (Original post by cpchem)
    Whoa... how much are we talking here?
    Err we got Clayden, Housecroft and Atkins all free. Two oxford primers too but no idea which they were.

    Over £100 in books free... that's what we pay our £3000 for :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by PoisonDonna)
    Err we got Clayden, Housecroft and Atkins all free. Two oxford primers too but no idea which they were.

    Over £100 in books free... that's what we pay our £3000 for :rolleyes:
    Meh, Housecroft's not a real book. We got the odd free primer - it helps having the authors as your tutors - consequently I must recommend without hesitation 'Amino Acid and Peptide Synthesis' and 'Core Carbonyl Chemistry' by J. H. Jones, and 'Foundations of Physics for Chemists' by G. A. D. Ritchie and some randomer.
 
 
 
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