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do you have a university trustfund. I don't and feel like crap. Watch

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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    the cheapest university I could have gone to would have cost $73,000 for a mediocre education
    :mmm: :mmm: :mmm:

    (Original post by la fille danse)
    Indeed.

    If you deposit £10 every week into a savings account with a modest 2.5% interest, by the time your child is 18, you'll have £11,000, enough to pay the fees for a three-year degree.

    You don't need to be rich to save £10 a week.
    Wow, you really have got it all worked out! Because, you know, we live in a world where everyone has £40 laying around in the bank account at the end of the month. I'm sure you've taken all situations into account. It must be because they're lazy and don't want to get a job.
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    I thought trust funds were just something mega-rich kids had?
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    Indeed.

    If you deposit £10 every week into a savings account with a modest 2.5% interest, by the time your child is 18, you'll have £11,000, enough to pay the fees for a three-year degree.

    You don't need to be rich to save £10 a week.
    First of all, people don't always have that money going spare, mine certainly don't at the moment. Secondly, most people don't tend to plan 18 years ahead. Finally, how is it the childs fault what the parents do anyway?
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    Secondly, most people don't tend to plan 18 years ahead.
    Uh, my point (and Bagration's, I believe) is that they should. Nobody wakes up and suddenly has an 18 year old child.

    Finally, how is it the childs fault what the parents do anyway?
    What?
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    Uh, my point (and Bagration's, I believe) is that they should. Nobody wakes up and suddenly has an 18 year old child.



    What?
    I don't think that a child is responsible for their parents actions. If their parents have not saved up to send them to uni (can't or chose not to, its irrelevant) I don't think the child as a seperate individual should suffer for this.
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    (Original post by G50)
    You still have yet to offer a better suggestion. :rolleyes: A community college is NOT a university, by the way. I didn't say 'the cheapest community college I could have gone to would have cost $73,000 for a mediocre education'.

    Either you can show me a university that's cheaper, or I'm right.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    Secondly, most people don't tend to plan 18 years ahead. Finally, how is it the childs fault what the parents do anyway?
    With the child trust funds they should. Childs fault?
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    I don't think that a child is responsible for their parents actions. If their parents have not saved up to send them to uni (can't or chose not to, its irrelevant) I don't think the child as a seperate individual should suffer for this.
    They don't suffer for it. Who said they do/should?
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    nope. dont have a problem with those who do though
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    They don't suffer for it. Who said they do/should?
    The point you seemed to be making is that it should be the parents responsibility to provide money for the child to attend university. I disagree with this as either out of choice or because of financial constraints not all parents will save the required money. Therefore the childs access to education would be affected by the financial situation/choices of their parents.

    How is it fair that a person should have better access to education and therefore a better start in live based on whos vagina they happened to come out of?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    With the child trust funds they should. Childs fault?
    Why should the child suffer if their parents don't/can't save money for higher education?
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    The point you seemed to be making is that it should be the parents responsibility to provide money for the child to attend university. I disagree with this as either out of choice or because of financial constraints not all parents will save the required money. Therefore the childs access to education would be affected by the financial situation/choices of their parents.
    My point was that you don't have to be rich (or anywhere near it) to save for your children.

    How is it fair that a person should have better access to education and therefore a better start in live based on whos vagina they happened to come out of?
    Err, everyone has access to higher education in England, some people just have to take loans for it.

    How is it fair that a person should have access to food from Waitrose instead of food from Asda based on whose vagina they happened to come out of? Welcome to the world.
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    If you can't put aside £10 a week for your child's future 18 years before they start going to University you are either living permanently on benefits or are just a really bad parent.
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    I have 5 siblings and none of us have such thing.
    I wouldn't want it either, since I know my mother would help me out if I had any financial issues. Also, I'm getting a scholarship and applied for a loan, so really .. I don't need any of it. If the situation was different however .. Well, yeah .. I'd blame my parents for not setting up a savings account for me when I was younger.
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    My point was that you don't have to be rich (or anywhere near it) to save for your children.



    Err, everyone has access to higher education in England, some people just have to take loans for it.

    How is it fair that a person should have access to food from Waitrose instead of food from Asda based on whose vagina they happened to come out of? Welcome to the world.
    My point was that it doesn't matter how easy or difficult it is to save for your children (although I think you are incredibly naive if you think everyone has spare cash each week), not every parent would do it even if they easily could afford to. Why should their children be disadvantaged because of their parents decision.

    The system in England is good I agree, it seemed like you were advocating the American way of doing things though.

    Obviously it is not entirely fair that children have different starts in life, although there is nothing wrong with Asda food! I'm not suggesting everyone should be treated entirely equally as children though, that is obviously totally unrealistic. However there are some basic minimums that I believe every person should be entitled to, one of which is access to education.
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    If you can't put aside £10 a week for your child's future 18 years before they start going to University you are either living permanently on benefits or are just a really bad parent.
    Your post shows an extreme level of the arrogance that is often the result of a privileged upbringing. How dare you sit there as an inexperienced 18 year old make judgements on whether people are "good parents" or not based on their economic situation. I almost feel sorry for you if you think that money is what parenting is about.
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    A small one. It paid out £1000 in my first year and will pay out about 600-700 this year. Would be more but the stock market obviously isn't doing too well.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    Your post shows an extreme level of the arrogance that is often the result of a privileged upbringing. How dare you sit there as an inexperienced 18 year old make judgements on whether people are "good parents" or not based on their economic situation. I almost feel sorry for you if you think that money is what parenting is about.
    So you think the child poverty PSA is a bad one?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    So you think the child poverty PSA is a bad one?
    The child poverty PSA is focused on lifting children out of poverty by supporting adults in low income families in finding work, with tax credits, and by spending money on making people aware of the benefits they are entitled to Why would I think any of this is bad :confused:

    How is that the same as writing off people as "bad parents" based on their economic situation?

    Oh, and not having a trustfund =/= living in poverty btw.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    Your post shows an extreme level of the arrogance that is often the result of a privileged upbringing. How dare you sit there as an inexperienced 18 year old make judgements on whether people are "good parents" or not based on their economic situation. I almost feel sorry for you if you think that money is what parenting is about.
    Let's look at some facts here.

    The average income for England is £24,000.

    The MAJORITY of people are in a dual parent household. So that's £48,000.

    £800 a year on two children for 18 years is not a particularly heavy price to pay.

    Now let's address the other issues.

    Obviously if you literally can't afford it then I'm not suggesting you're a bad parent. What I'm saying is that not saving for your child's future -- and uni, and debt, are significant parts of someone's future -- is irresponsible. It doesn't matter how much you put in. What matters is how you plan so that your child can have the best possible future. Yes, this involves sacrifice. Yes, it involves giving up some of your money. So what? Working for your child's future is part of childbearing.

    And again obviously this is only one part, the attitudes you instill in your child and your moral and intellectual support are also important, even more important than finance.

    Oh, btw: plz don't comment on my upbringing as you have no idea whether I'm privileged or not or what my idea of privileged is compared to yours. Frankly, since I spend every summer in the developing world, I think that your idea of privileged is... not the same as mine. 95% of Britain is privileged.
 
 
 
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