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do you have a university trustfund. I don't and feel like crap. Watch

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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    You still have yet to offer a better suggestion. :rolleyes: A community college is NOT a university, by the way. I didn't say 'the cheapest community college I could have gone to would have cost $73,000 for a mediocre education'.
    Really? Wow.

    Community college allows you to go on to a "real" university for the last two years to get your bachelor's, and it's the latter that really matters, not your associate's degree. Huge money saved right there. Nobody's forcing you to go to a "real" university for 4 years. Of course it's better if you can, but don't tell me that it's the only way.

    But you're probably "too good" for the kind of people who usually go to CC. You wouldn't want to associate yourself with them even though you could get a bachelor's from a high ranking, "real" university afterwards, would you? It's just not worth saving the money, is it. :rolleyes:

    No, really, for 100th time, it's great that your parents had that money so that you could go wherever you wanted. But stop acting as if you're entitled to that much money just so you can go to university. The fact that plenty of people go to "real" universities, top tier nonetheless, in the USA, without that much help from their parents, kind of contradicts the idea. They work, they get loans (up to $50,000 if your parents don't qualify), they move to get cheaper in-state tuition fees ($5000 at Georgia Tech - ranked 35th in US unis), they get scholarships and grants, etc. Some even *GASP* save money by doing the first two years of their bachelor's in a community college *GASP* (how plebeian of them :hat:).
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    The child poverty PSA is focused on lifting children out of poverty by supporting adults in low income families in finding work, with tax credits, and by spending money on making people aware of the benefits they are entitled to Why would I think any of this is bad :confused:

    How is that the same as writing off people as "bad parents" based on their economic situation?

    Oh, and not having a trustfund =/= living in poverty btw.
    Because if you cant set aside approx a tenner a week it must surely put you into that bracket.

    It doesn't say anything about parenting, but your reaction to a tenner a week being a vast amount of money would suggest poverty by the definition used.

    Any disagreement there?
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    Haha I wish!!

    Nah I don't have one either, it does feel kinda crappy espicially wen u have m8s that have!
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Because if you cant set aside approx a tenner a week it must surely put you into that bracket.

    It doesn't say anything about parenting, but your reaction to a tenner a week being a vast amount of money would suggest poverty by the definition used.

    Any disagreement there?
    My personal situation is that my mum is too ill to work, my dad was out of work for 3 months recently and about half of the money I earn myself working goes towards family stuff, the other half I either save for university or spend on myself. I've taken a year out to save up for uni. We don't live in poverty by any means, I paid for my brother to go on a residential school trip quite recently for example, but for various reasons we are in quite a lot of debt and there literally isn't any spare cash around at the moment. I went to asda with a big bag of coppers the other day to change in the machine and put towards groceries.

    I have brilliant parents, they have always done the best they can for me, but I have never had a savings account set up for me, and even if I had it would have been spent on something more urgent by now.
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    (Original post by priceless_beauty)
    Hi

    Basically im hopefully going off to uni this year, and whilst talking to some of my friends, they have mentioned a trust fund, that thier parents set up for when they go to university, which theyre going to use as an instant cash injection when they need it for parties and going out, i have nothing of the sort, and only have the money i have earnt via a part time job which is about a grand and a half.

    How common is a trust fund?

    how many people have something like this?
    I never had a trust fund, my parents couldn't afford to save for me when I was younger. However they helped me a great deal during university. I also worked full time during the Summer to earn money and save. Why should it feel crap to not have a trustfund? Not everyone's parents can afford to save, your friends should count themselves as very lucky.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    My personal situation is that my mum is too ill to work, my dad was out of work for 3 months recently and about half of the money I earn myself working goes towards family stuff, the other half I either save for university or spend on myself. I've taken a year out to save up for uni. We don't live in poverty by any means, I paid for my brother to go on a residential school trip quite recently for example, but for various reasons we are in quite a lot of debt and there literally isn't any spare cash around at the moment. I went to asda with a big bag of coppers the other day to change in the machine and put towards groceries.

    I have brilliant parents, they have always done the best they can for me, but I have never had a savings account set up for me, and even if I had it would have been spent on something more urgent by now.
    Don't worry about it. If this thread is proof of anything, it's that a lot of people don't have any kind of "trust fund". That must make most parents in Britain terrible, according to some. :rolleyes:
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    I don't have one, although it would have been nice.
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    Let's look at some facts here.

    The average income for England is £24,000.

    The MAJORITY of people are in a dual parent household. So that's £48,000.

    £800 a year on two children for 18 years is not a particularly heavy price to pay.

    Now let's address the other issues.

    Obviously if you literally can't afford it then I'm not suggesting you're a bad parent. What I'm saying is that not saving for your child's future -- and uni, and debt, are significant parts of someone's future -- is irresponsible. It doesn't matter how much you put in. What matters is how you plan so that your child can have the best possible future. Yes, this involves sacrifice. Yes, it involves giving up some of your money. So what? Working for your child's future is part of childbearing.

    And again obviously this is only one part, the attitudes you instill in your child and your moral and intellectual support are also important, even more important than finance.

    Oh, btw: plz don't comment on my upbringing as you have no idea whether I'm privileged or not or what my idea of privileged is compared to yours. Frankly, since I spend every summer in the developing world, I think that your idea of privileged is... not the same as mine. 95% of Britain is privileged.
    1. Half of the population fall below the "average"
    2. A lot of families don't have two parents working full time
    3. A lot of families have many children to provide for
    4. People have all sorts of outgoings to deal with

    Yes I'm aware that quality of life is much worse in many countries than it is in England, but surely that is a testament to the welfare state? Just because there are more severe problems in other contries doesn't mean that problems in this country should be ignored.
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    I have one, but we are using that to pay off my loans as well as send me in bits for maintenance as the loan won't cover even accomodation...

    We're taking advantage of the interest free loans for the time being and growing the fund while I'm still at uni by dipping into it as little as possible.
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    10 out of 15 people on the first page said they didn't have a trust fund (and one didn't answer). Maybe I'll check the entire thread later.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    We don't live in poverty by any means,

    I went to asda with a big bag of coppers the other day to change in the machine and put towards groceries.

    I have brilliant parents, they have always done the best they can for me, but I have never had a savings account set up for me, and even if I had it would have been spent on something more urgent by now.
    So your household income is more than 2/3rd the median?

    If not then you are.
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    I did have one until my parents couldn't afford the mortgage and used it... now I have none
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    (Original post by G50)
    10 out of 15 people on the first page said they didn't have a trust fund (and one didn't answer). Maybe I'll check the entire thread later.
    How is trust fund being defined? I don't subscribe to the only definition so far given.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    So your household income is more than 2/3rd the median?

    If not then you are.
    Idk, I thought we were talking absolute poverty rather than relative.
    What difference does it make anyway? There are plenty of people in situations like mine, and plenty of people much worse off. It doesn't mean they have "bad parents" and it certainly doesn't mean they should have less access to education.
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    (Original post by G50)
    Don't worry about it. If this thread is proof of anything, it's that a lot of people don't have any kind of "trust fund". That must make most parents in Britain terrible, according to some. :rolleyes:
    I don't think I personally know anyone who has one.
    I know I shouldn't get wound up, but it makes me cross to see people making smug assumptions about any parents who have done things different to how theirs did.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    1. Half of the population fall below the "average"
    2. A lot of families don't have two parents working full time
    3. A lot of families have many children to provide for
    4. People have all sorts of outgoings to deal with

    Yes I'm aware that quality of life is much worse in many countries than it is in England, but surely that is a testament to the welfare state? Just because there are more severe problems in other contries doesn't mean that problems in this country should be ignored.
    1. This doesn't really dilute my point.
    2&3. As I said, if you literally can't afford it, but I honestly don't think that's the case.
    4. University is an outgoing -.-

    I don't think that's a testament to the Welfare State at all. It's much more complicated. The point stands that while you may complain about being in debt £20,000 is a severe inhibitor to go to University, frankly I think the fact you can consider going to school at all makes you privileged, looking at the world in general.
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    1. This doesn't really dilute my point.
    2&3. As I said, if you literally can't afford it, but I honestly don't think that's the case.
    4. University is an outgoing -.-

    I don't think that's a testament to the Welfare State at all. It's much more complicated. The point stands that while you may complain about being in debt £20,000 is a severe inhibitor to go to University, frankly I think the fact you can consider going to school at all makes you privileged, looking at the world in general.
    I'm not complaining about getting into debt to go to university. I was disagreeing with the girl who seemed to think that we should have an American style system, and anyone saying people who don't set up trust funds are bad parents. I think that going to university is definitely worth getting into debt for, and I have worked for a year to help myself out even more.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    Idk, I thought we were talking absolute poverty rather than relative.
    What difference does it make anyway? There are plenty of people in situations like mine, and plenty of people much worse off. It doesn't mean they have "bad parents" and it certainly doesn't mean they should have less access to education.
    I thought I made it quite clear I was taking about the child poverty PSA not the $2 a day IMF level.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    I thought I made it quite clear I was taking about the child poverty PSA not the $2 a day IMF level.
    There are various definitions of absolute poverty. I've read back and you did make that clear though, sorry. I don't really see what difference it makes to this discussion whether I personally am classified as living in relative povery.
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    (Original post by Abhead)
    I'm not complaining about getting into debt to go to university. I was disagreeing with the girl who seemed to think that we should have an American style system, and anyone saying people who don't set up trust funds are bad parents. I think that going to university is definitely worth getting into debt for, and I have worked for a year to help myself out even more.
    Ok, but many people do complain about the debt from student loans, which is the point. At some point or another, everything in your life stops becoming free. I don't see why other people should have to accommodate some people's desire for that to be extended as long as possible, that's my primary point.
 
 
 
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