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    Right, so I really didn't care about GCSEs at all and got:

    5Bs, 1C and 4Ds

    But at AS level I'm studying RE, Biology, Classic Civilisation, English Language and General Studies (well, took the exam, had no lessons/revision in it), and if I'm honest I don't think I completely messed up the papers- however the really smart people (ie. 11A*s at GCSE kind of people) were panicing and saying they completely messed up.

    Are they over reacting, or is there a chance that they did mess up due to over confidence? Like mt boyfriend's mate who was a straight A student but was so confident in himself he got straight Us at AS level... just a random question to see what you've seen :yes:
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    The answer is no.
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    Their idea of messing up tends to be a little different to actually messing up. It probably means 'oh i got 85% instead of 100% or something along those lines. If they're really clever, there are people with like 15A*s at my college, who think that if they say 'oh i messed up', people will give them attention and provide them with an opportunity to brag about their GCSE grades. If they did actually mess up, which I've also seen quite a lot, then it's probably because they became a bit self-assured before the exam and believed they didn't need to revise.
    Either way, it doesn't really matter how everyone else thinks they did; I'm sure you did fine and you should most definitely ignore these other people. You're GCSEs aren't as bad as you think, and if you worked hard and the exams went well for you, there is no reason why you can't be achieving the top grades. Many people don't think there is a good correlation between success at GCSE and success at AS or A Level, so don't worry
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    People tend to say they messed up a lot when they were completely fine. Your GCSE grades don't matter, I'm sure you did fine.
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    as before, people say "messed up" but they probably mean not banked a high A at AS by their high standards if they got straight A*s at GCSE or w/e.

    It's like yourself saying you got bad GCSEs even though you got mostly Bs which are above average, you know?

    generally though the better GCSEs does indicate better A levels, but that's because the student to get the GCSEs was probably inteligent and worked hard and will do the same for A levels, as opposed to it simply being bad GCSEs means you will definitely have bad A levels.
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    no...i knw someone who got straight As at GCSEs then got C's and D's at a-level...it's all about how much effort you put in at each exam...
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    (Original post by becbec :))
    If they're really clever, there are people with like 15A*s at my college, who think that if they say 'oh i messed up', people will give them attention and provide them with an opportunity to brag about their GCSE grades.
    What!!!!!! How the hell does anyone do that?
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    (Original post by Banburyhammer)
    What!!!!!! How the hell does anyone do that?

    probably an exaggeration was my first thought. Although it does happen. You know, posh grammar/private school, pushy parents, (lonely?) intelligent kid etc can make it happen. Im not saying anyone who gets 15A*s is like that. It's just some things that could make it happen.
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    Ignoring the context for a second, people who achieve lower grades in GCSEs (for whatever reason) tend to achieve lower grades in GCEs.

    But that doesn't really matter to individuals since they can, and do, change - they can work harder, they can learn better, they can prepare better, etc. But they actually have to go and actively improve more than the course makes them.

    I'm sure that this will be followed by, "my mate..." or "I know two people" or "my mum's sisters's boyfriend's aunt's daughter..." :rolleyes:
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    It all depends on whether you care about getting good results or not and how much effort you put in. If you work hard rather than f*ck around then you'll do better.
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    I got straight A's at GCSE and C's and B's in my AS's.

    No correlation what-so-ever. I just got lazy in my first year...

    The difference between college is that (most of the time) you're there because you want to be. If you feel you've worked hard through the year and prepared fully. There shouldn't be any reason why you can't get A's.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Ignoring the context for a second, people who achieve lower grades in GCSEs (for whatever reason) tend to achieve lower grades in GCEs.

    But that doesn't really matter to individuals since they can, and do, change - they can work harder, they can learn better, they can prepare better, etc. But they actually have to go and actively improve more than the course makes them.

    I'm sure that this will be followed by, "my mate..." or "I know two people" or "my mum's sisters's boyfriend's aunt's daughter..." :rolleyes:
    This.

    At A level alot of people are surprised by the work load. If you've worked consistently well throughout the last year you have little to worry about.

    At GCSE I got 2A*s 1A 5Bs and 5Cs. I'm now looking at probably getting AAB/ABB/ABC. I worked my proverbial butt off this last year aswell.
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    Bad GCSEs might well = Bad A Levels
    Bad GCSEs might = Good A Levels
    Good GCSEs could = Good A Levels
    Good GCSEs might also = Bad A Levels

    Depends on the individual. Chipping in on the anecdotal front, I know many people who simply didn't take GCSEs seriously. It's not the end of the world
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    I got 1A 3B 4C 2D at GCSE and got AAA in chemistry, physics and maths in Jan. And expecting AABa in August. Its down to the individual. Anyone can get an A, just takes a little time!
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    It's alright. Your GCSE's are good. You might not think so because a lot of people on here have some of the best GCSE's, but it's actually a very small minority who have these results so it's not really representative. Your GCSE's are much higher than the majority of results.

    I didn't get as good results as other people on here but I just done a bit of research into my courses before I started, bought some revision guides and eased myself into it - that definately helped!

    As long as realize how hard they can be and demanding on your time then you should be able to expect the impact it will make, whereas others will be knocked off their feet and sink sadly. What can I say, good luck mate!
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    You need to remember that people's reaction to exams are very relative: for instance, a very clever person may think they've done badly, but actually they only got a couple wrong, and so may still have got an A, whereas someone who has always done badly in exams may think they've done well (and thus better than the negative other person), but only in relation to their previous achievement, meaning they actually do worse than the other, in spite of their more optimistic outlook.
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    I have bad GCSEs by TSR standards, but I'm predicted AAA so no. AS level is very different to GCSE; I think I adapted better to AS & A2, and thus found them a lot "easier" (but still hard!) than I found GCSEs.
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    One would think so but the truth is for many students their GCSE grades aren't even the slightest true representation of their potential. This being because at GCSE they mess around, don't really bother with studying etc. and hence bad results. When it comes to A-levels not only are they extra motivated (after having recieved horrific results) but they generally take the exams so much more seriously because it's to get into universities/work placements.
    Also, I've seen many students with outstanding GCSE results going into A-levels thinking they are a genius and can ace it with their eyes closed hence don't put as much effort in. This results to them getting average/bad A-level results. Ofcourse, the best students are those that keep their academic performance consistant through the years, from SATs to GCSEs to A-levels. I don't really judge students with their GCSE grades though to be honest, I've seen even the brightest ones mess around and not really care about their exams. A-levels are the ones to be taken into consideration :yep:
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    (Original post by Revolution is my Name)
    You need to remember that people's reaction to exams are very relative: for instance, a very clever person may think they've done badly, but actually they only got a couple wrong, and so may still have got an A, whereas someone who has always done badly in exams may think they've done well (and thus better than the negative other person), but only in relation to their previous achievement, meaning they actually do worse than the other, in spite of their more optimistic outlook.

    Very true
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    not really, there are people who get A* and A's in their GCSE and end up with C's and D's for their A-levels
 
 
 
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