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Swine Flu Immunity watch

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    If you catch swine flu now, will you be immune to any future outbreaks of swine flu in the future?

    That's how a vaccine works isn't it? The vaccine contains a weakened version of the virus which your body kills, then your immune to that virus because your body recognises it. So surely if you caught and recovered from swine flu now, it would have the same effect as a vaccine?
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    Sounds about right, why not throw a Swine Flu party??

    :awesome:
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    Well.... if you caught it now you'd be immune to more deadly versions of the virus in the future right?
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    Potentially. Expose to swine flu now will deliver some degree of immunity, how much immunity depends on how much the virus mutates between the initial exposure and any subsequent exposure.
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    That's what I would have thought.
    But then apparently it's likely to mutate and vary and so you're not necessarily immune to all strains.
    I dunno, I can't remember AS level Biology. :ninja:
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    You'll only be immune to the current strain. But if you catch swine flu now, and recover, some of the antibodies your body makes will be retained and so any encounter with a mutated strain is likely to be less nasty. The amount of protection you would have would depend on how different any future flu virus you may encounter is to the virus you caught now.
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    You will be immune because your body will have produced the necessary antibodies. Unless the virus mutates of course :awesome:
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    (Original post by Reagan Smash)
    Sounds about right, why not throw a Swine Flu party??

    :awesome:
    I lol-ed :yes:
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    If you catch it now, you will have immunity to that particular strain but you can catch it again if it mutates like normal flu as it may have a rapid mutation rate. Having immunity to a certain strain will not make catching a different strain any less severe.

    A vaccine contains a 'deactivated' form of the viruses so that your immune system can respond to the antigens present on the surface, to produce antibodies, so that it can produce a faster immune response.
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    (Original post by ellieg33)
    I lol-ed :yes:
    I didn't - there's a certain amount of sense in it. But at the moment, the risk benefit balance is a bit too negative for it to be recommended.
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    (Original post by Dadeling)
    If you catch it now, you will have immunity to that particular strain but you can catch it again if it mutates like normal flu as it may have a rapid mutation rate. Having immunity to a certain strain will not make catching a different strain any less severe.
    It's more linear than that, the virus doesn't just suddenly mutate to something completely different, it's a gradual process where immunity will degrade over time as the virus progressively mutates further away the strain that the individual was exposed to.
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    Or it could backfire, and by catching it now, and the virus then mutates - your immune system won't produce an immune response to the new strain but rather the old one - in which case you're a bit screwed.
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    if it mutates then nothing will work on it until we find something that does...we cant know in advance
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    (Original post by ali242)
    if it mutates then nothing will work on it until we find something that does...we cant know in advance
    What do you think 'works on it' now? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by ArchedEdge)
    Or it could backfire, and by catching it now, and the virus then mutates - your immune system won't produce an immune response to the new strain but rather the old one - in which case you're a bit screwed.
    It's an oversimplification, but, if the virus completely mutates and no longer resembles the current H1N1 virus then you'd be right, but it won't mutate that far.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    It's more linear than that, the virus doesn't just suddenly mutate to something completely different, it's a gradual process where immunity will degrade over time as the virus progressively mutates further away the strain that the individual was exposed to.
    I do know that, I am studying biology. :rolleyes: By mutation, I mean the one in DNA where it usually applies to a single base pair. I do know that the whole DNA content of a virus would not just suddenly completely mutate.
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    (Original post by Dadeling)
    I do know that, I am studying biology. :rolleyes: By mutation, I mean the one in DNA where it usually applies to a single base pair. I do know that the whole DNA content of a virus would not just suddenly completely mutate.
    I think it's fairly safe to say that there aren't going to be any DNA changes...
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    Oh, also, if you've had normal flu (I've had about 3 different strains) do you already have some immunity against Swine Flu since some of the elements are the same? And could this be the reason why many over 65's (who are supposedly in the vulnerable group) are not getting it due to their exposure during the past 2 pandemics?
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    (Original post by Renal)
    I think it's fairly safe to say that there aren't going to be any DNA changes...
    And why would that be? Not all viruses contain only RNA.
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    (Original post by Dadeling)
    And why would that be? Not all viruses contain only RNA.
    Orthomyxoviridae.
 
 
 
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