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Do you think that education (UK) pushes you towards exams/qualifications too much? Watch

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    I think its alsmot the opposite, our school is so unfocused on exams it is unreal!
    We often get taught things that are interesting to those who are involved with the subject, but many people as soon as they hear the words " you won't need to know this for GCSE" totally switch off.
    A lot of our learning is done from us picking up the textbooks and learning it on our own!
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    Yes. A situation where a person can be examined every year from the age of 15 to 21 (and beyond if they go postgrad) is ridiculous.
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    (Original post by SpamBa)
    Yes. A situation where a person can be examined every year from the age of 15 to 21 (and beyond if they go postgrad) is ridiculous.
    Yet, TSR speaks "GCSEs are so easy" "A-levels are getting easier".

    Your point being?

    And tbh, that's life. Life was not made to be easy and to coast through. That's why there are exams - to test you. If you fail them, well, isn't that the purpose of the exams? To catch out the ones that coast through etc etc?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Yet, TSR speaks "GCSEs are so easy" "A-levels are getting easier".

    Your point being?

    And tbh, that's life. Life was not made to be easy and to coast through. That's why there are exams - to test you. If you fail them, well, isn't that the purpose of the exams? To catch out the ones that coast through etc etc?
    Please shut up

    Unlike you I believe education should be about learning, not about becoming a trained seal who can pass an exam but displays neither critical thinking nor wider interest in the subjects they are learning.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    They need not be every year, though.
    So what do you propose, an overhaul of GCSEs and A-levels AGAIN?!

    Plus exams at AS year is needed, how will universities know what you're been up to in Year 12? Supposing you only took exams at Year 11 and Year 13.

    And don't say scrap GCSEs...

    Or taking ALL GCSEs at end of Year 10 for example. How will that work when 50% of school leavers can't get basic maths and English, let alone a year early?

    And also, what happens in Year 11, supposing everyone took ALL GCSEs in Year 10? Pleminary (sp?) studies for AS level? Well... looking at the opinions of TSR - wouldn't that just make AS levels even easier?

    Just leave the exams be. I mean, people off TSR have come off it quite well, haven't they?

    Exams are needed. End of. If you can't do them, you haven't worked hard enough.

    Actually, to refer back to the title - it doesn't do enough! School leavers are leaving school without the basic qualifications and being put off from further education. Also, the vocational route is not really a good one, since businesses are going bust and aren't able to give enough apprenticeships.

    I mean, this is not my opinion, my TSR, in general, think exams are getting easier. And it's fact. University entry grades are going up, changes of syllabus etc. YET, still, people aren't getting the grades. The Government need to do more, plus MORE discipline. It's absolutely shocking the level of discipline nowadays compared to 50 years ago or something.

    I mean, the Government saying "every year grades are getting better", "it's going up every year" "higher percentage of A grades than ever!" - yet, young people can't get jobs, and even if they go to uni, they're not guaranteed a good job.

    Nowadays, people are not interested in academia. I've seen no one - not even on here surprisingly that wants a career in academia. Why? The Government is shelving vocational A-levels, which they claim is the same worth as traditional A-levels; however, they want more people to take up the sciences!

    Even worse, they're dumbing down GCSE Science to make it more "accessible". :rolleyes: If anything, the UK needs to be a hell of a lot stricter with education in this country. I mean teenagers can coast through school - literally. Because they know they'll be moving up and up. Never being held back. I say, let underachievers be held back. America does it, and loads more countries as well. Why can't the UK?

    Also, it's really demoralising that the UK wants average people. Have you noticed it? Underachievers left behind, that's it. Overachievers on the other hand are just "coasting" through GCSEs and A-Levels in another way. I mean, even on here they say they are learning exam technique and not actual content. Is this want we want for the UK.

    Ed Balls can suck balls.
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    (Original post by Andy the Anarchist)
    Please shut up

    Unlike you I believe education should be about learning, not about becoming a trained seal who can pass an exam but displays neither critical thinking nor wider interest in the subjects they are learning.
    I may come across as hypocritical but I agree with you! That's what education is about. Being taught and learning something. Not exam technique. I agree with you!

    And for the sake of it, I am allowed my own opinion thank you very much. Yes, sometimes they may be mis-informed, but I am allowed it. Where's my freedom of speech?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Yet, TSR speaks "GCSEs are so easy" "A-levels are getting easier".

    Your point being?

    And tbh, that's life. Life was not made to be easy and to coast through. That's why there are exams - to test you. If you fail them, well, isn't that the purpose of the exams? To catch out the ones that coast through etc etc?
    That is true, but people are mostly taught how to pass that exam, and coursework stuff and not actually go further, or excell in the given subject. Maybe the subject content shouldn't be so fixed?
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    Certainly, too much emphasis is placed on surface learning to pass exams and as a consequence not enough understanding is fostered.
    100% true. I have a friend who got a 100% mark in one of the mathematics modules (the hardest one, in fact), yet they readily confess to understanding NOTHING of the principles. Instead, they simply learned how to do the questions because they were all so formulaic!! Their mark in no way reflects their ability or potential... Fortunately, they didn't go on to study physics in the end!!
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    I learnt quite a bit from scouts, and what I did learn there has been more valuable to me now than school ever did. I imagine those who went to a private school, who run with army cadets, express similar experiences.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    Yes.
    Do what I suggested a while back - incorporate HE certificates, in whole or in part, into post-16 education. That way students will be learning in a more scholarly way which is more akin to university life. I would have studied a HE certificate/diploma as a replacement for 'A' levels had I known about them and their availability, and their acceptance at admissions tutors for prospective courses at university.
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    I was never taught mathematics.

    I was taught how to pass a narrow set of modular maths exams; to learn the general structure of a exam paper (the order and style of the questions were nearly identical every year); so study the allocation of points on past markschemes; to learn how to order an answer and generally go through questions like a robot, rather than understand the mathematical concepts and principles behind the questions given. I knew the method of finding the area between a given curve and the x-axis, but was never taught why that method worked. The British education system is a truly shocking institution. The frequency of exams left the teacher struggling for time, and it absolutely encouraged a boring and utterly bland teaching-to-the-test culture.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    I'm not advocating abolishing exams. It's just we have too many of them that test little bits at a time which encourages the learn->pass->forget cycle. With so many exams the focus shifts from teaching the subject to teaching the test. Without so many exams there would be more time to actually learn more and in greater depth.
    I agree 100% :yep:
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    I'm not too bothered about having exams that actually tested my knowledge of a subject but most of my exams test me on how well I learned exam technique. For example, I had 2 exams for history, one of them you answered questions about historical sources and the other you write 2 essays on a chosen topic under a chosen heading from the paper. For the source questions I only needed about an A4 page worth of info and the rest of it was learning to recognise what type of question I was answering and how to answer it using a formula we got taught in class. With the essays it was the same story - just learning a few paragraphs of information and putting it into a plan that differs depending on what type of question you were asked.
 
 
 
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