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    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/8157795.stm

    The Taliban have released a 28-minute video showing a US soldier captured in Afghanistan last month.

    In the video, the soldier, in grey clothes and with shaved head, says being a prisoner is "unnerving".

    He says the US public has the power to bring troops home to be "back where we belong and not over here, wasting our time and our lives".

    The US military identified him as the missing soldier and named him as Pte Bowe Bergdahl, 23, from Ketchum, Idaho.

    The spokesman condemned the Taliban for issuing "propaganda" footage.

    'Against international law'

    Pte Bergdahl, who went missing on 30 June in Paktika province, eastern Afghanistan, says in the video the date is 14 July and that he was captured as he lagged behind while on a patrol.

    Please bring us home. It is America and American people who have that power.

    Pte Bergdahl, interviewed in English, says he has "a very, very good family" in America.

    "I miss them and I'm afraid that I might never see them again, and that I'll never be able to tell them that I love them again, and I'll never be able to hug them," he says.

    When asked about his condition he replies: "Well I'm scared, scared I won't be able to go home. It is very unnerving to be a prisoner."

    A voice off camera asks if he has a message for his "people".

    "To my fellow Americans who have loved ones over here, who know what it's like to miss them, you have the power to make our government bring them home," he says.



    "Please, please bring us home so that we can be back where we belong and not over here, wasting our time and our lives and our precious life that we could be using back in our own country.

    "Please bring us home. It is America and American people who have that power."

    US military spokesman in Kabul, Capt Jon Stock, condemned the use of the video.

    He told Reuters news agency: "The use of the soldier for propaganda purposes we view as against international law.

    "We are continuing to do whatever possible to recover the soldier safe and unharmed."

    Leaflets have been distributed and a reward offered for his safe return.

    The US military said the soldier disappeared after walking off base with three Afghan colleagues.

    He is believed to be the first soldier seized in either Iraq or Afghanistan for at least two years.
    A very sad and difficult situation, especially for his family. Clearly the Taleban will prolong this as much as they can. There is no chance of the troops being called home because of blackmail, so where does this leave this poor soldier?

    Maybe paying a ransom might work with secret undercover negotiations or release some taleban? (they can be killed later)

    The less media coverage the safer for the soldier. I think they should round up as many taleban as they can from these areas and use whatever method possible to extract vital clues from these barbarians.
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    he iz good as dead
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    When Hezbollah took several Russian hostages in Lebanon in the 1980s, the USSR sent Hezbollah a package of ears. Needless to say Hezbollah swiftly released the hostages.

    But the US won't do that, so this guy does not have much hope unless a special operations team finds him. Even though I have the utmost respect for him because he is in the US army, it does sound like he went walkabout against orders...
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    I hope the poor lad gets through. Terrible situation to be in.
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    (Original post by Neo Con)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/8157795.stm


    Maybe paying a ransom might work with secret undercover negotiations or release some taleban? (they can be killed later)

    The less media coverage the safer for the soldier. I think they should round up as many taleban as they can from these areas and use whatever method possible to extract vital clues from these barbarians.



    It's funny that you call them barbarians, and yet seem more than eager for your government to carry out acts of barbarism itself.
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    It's funny that you call them barbarians, and yet seem more than eager for your government to carry out acts of barbarism itself.
    It's funny how you think

    The coalition forces are doing an admirable job out there, they are fighting the taleban which has an extremely poor track record in human rights and is responsible for global terror.

    The soldiers are risking their lives out there voluntarily for the greater good, they deserve the backing of the public and they always will get it regardless of minorities like you who would probably turn a blind eye sitting in your arm chair sipping tea.
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    Kidnapping soldiers may just become the weapon of choice from terrorist organizations. I for one hope the US does not follow Israel's bad example and doesn't capitulate to any of their demands in the case of kidnappings.
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    (Original post by PeeWeeDan)
    Kidnapping soldiers may just become the weapon of choice from terrorist organizations. I for one hope the US does not follow Israel's bad example and doesn't capitulate to any of their demands in the case of kidnappings.
    Hmm. In 1976 Israel succeeded in a daring operation when Uganda's Idi Amin Dada was holding Israeli hostages. That was one heck of an operation but things have changed now. Also Israeli action in response to munich massacre was courageous.

    They should try and rescue this soldier, if he dies during the operation, at least they tried and never gave in to their demands. Better than just watching and letting them use him as a propaganda tool with the customary beheading 6 months down the line.
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    (Original post by Neo Con)
    Hmm. In 1976 Israel succeeded in a daring operation when Uganda's Idi Amin Dada was holding Israeli hostages. That was one heck of an operation but things have changed now. Also Israeli action in response to munich massacre was courageous.

    They should try and rescue this soldier, if he dies during the operation, at least they tried and never gave in to their demands. Better than just watching and letting them use him as a propaganda tool with the customary beheading 6 months down the line.
    The Entebbe Israel would have Goldwasser, Regev and Shalit back alive. It doesn't.
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    (Original post by PeeWeeDan)
    The Entebbe Israel would have Goldwasser, Regev and Shalit back alive. It doesn't.
    I know. It's pathetic how long they let Shalit be held captive.
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    (Original post by PeeWeeDan)
    The Entebbe Israel would have Goldwasser, Regev and Shalit back alive. It doesn't.
    Oh Hai there Dorothy, it's not the 1970's any more.
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    (Original post by Neo Con)
    It's funny how you think

    The coalition forces are doing an admirable job out there, they are fighting the taleban which has an extremely poor track record in human rights and is responsible for global terror.

    The soldiers are risking their lives out there voluntarily for the greater good, they deserve the backing of the public and they always will get it regardless of minorities like you who would probably turn a blind eye sitting in your arm chair sipping tea.


    I am sorry, but you need to do some pre 9/11 reading. We in the west, most notably America is responsible for Islamic fundamentalism and therefore global terrorism. Saddam, Osama, our Governments made them what they were. For example, after it was made clear that there were no WMD's in Iraq the mission objective suddenly changed to "we are taking down Saddam because of his crimes against the kurds etc, etc." Shockingly while he was gassing those 5000 innocent kurds we were his close allies. I mean we encouraged him to gas the Iranians with our own chemical technology!

    Everything terrible that has happened in the Middle East for the last 50 years, has had American fingerprints all over it. I dare you to even try and deny this.

    I am aware that the Taliban are tyrants, but it was your governments foreign policy in the 70's 80's and 90's that bought them into power. Are you just going to ignore this and preach to everyone how evil they are, and how much of an admirable job coalition forces are doing. Fighting for the greater good, lolwut :lolwut: All our boys and girls are dying for nowadays is to clean up the mess our governments created in the 80's.
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    I am sorry, but you need to do some pre 9/11 reading. We in the west, most notably America is responsible for Islamic fundamentalism and therefore global terrorism. Saddam, Osama, our Governments made them what they were. For example, after it was made clear that there were no WMD's in Iraq the mission objective suddenly changed to "we are taking down Saddam because of his crimes against the kurds etc, etc." Shockingly while he was gassing those 5000 innocent kurds we were his close allies. I mean we encouraged him to gas the Iranians with our own chemical technology!

    Everything terrible that has happened in the Middle East for the last 50 years, has had American fingerprints all over it. I dare you to even try and deny this.

    I am aware that the Taliban are tyrants, but it was your governments foreign policy in the 70's 80's and 90's that bought them into power. Are you just going to ignore this and preach to everyone how evil they are, and how much of an admirable job coalition forces are doing. Fighting for the greater good, lolwut :lolwut: All our boys and girls are dying for nowadays is to clean up the mess our governments created in the 80's.

    I am sorry but you need to understand politics. Lesser of the 2 evils. Iran V Iraq e.t.c Please use some common sense, none of this rambo talk.

    Islam has always had been vicious since it was founded.
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    (Original post by Neo Con)
    I am sorry but you need to understand politics. Lesser of the 2 evils. Iran V Iraq e.t.c Please use some common sense, none of this rambo talk.

    Islam has always had been vicious since it was founded.

    Lol, i need to understand politics :lolwut: Let me educate you.

    In 1973 Afghanistan became a fully functioning and really quite liberal democracy, The Democratic Republic of Afghanistan promoted equal rights for women, freedom of Religion etc. It had very great potential as a nation. Hoowever America saw Afghnaistan only as a tool against the Soviets, and began manipulating and exploiting it's leaders and it's people, funding anti Soviet forces even though it was obvious this would provoke a reaction from the north at the expense of innocent Afghan lives. Surprise, surprise in 1979 the Soviets invade and full scale warfare ensues against the American funded Mujahadeen, which included a young Osama Bin Laden. Ten years later 2 million Afghans lay dead as the Soviets withdraw, America, believeing it's job to be done also leaves, just like that. Those same men who America had trained and armed to the teeth now run amok across the country, mass rapes occur, innocent civilians die by the thousand, men assume the title of warlord, but the west doesn't care anymore, Afghanistan is no longer worth a penny. It was this lawless and bitter society that welcomed the Taliban in the 90's for the Afghani people any kind of order was a relief from the chaos that America had caused. America and the west bought the situation in Afghanistan upon itself by carelessly exploiting developing countries around the world. Imagine how different life would be presently if the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan had survived.Our Governments are to blame for the current situation, for Al Qaeda, for Osama and for all of our brave soldiers returning home in boxes.
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    Lol, i need to understand politics :lolwut: Let me educate you.

    In 1973 Afghanistan became a fully functioning and really quite liberal democracy, The Democratic Republic of Afghanistan promoted equal rights for women, freedom of Religion etc. It had very great potential as a nation. Hoowever America saw Afghnaistan only as a tool against the Soviets, and began manipulating and exploiting it's leaders and it's people, funding anti Soviet forces even though it was obvious this would provoke a reaction from the north at the expense of innocent Afghan lives. Surprise, surprise in 1979 the Soviets invade and full scale warfare ensues against the American funded Mujahadeen, which included a young Osama Bin Laden. Ten years later 2 million Afghans lay dead as the Soviets withdraw, America, believeing it's job to be done also leaves, just like that. Those same men who America had trained and armed to the teeth now run amok across the country, mass rapes occur, innocent civilians die by the thousand, men assume the title of warlord, but the west doesn't care anymore, Afghanistan is no longer worth a penny. It was this lawless and bitter society that welcomed the Taliban in the 90's for the Afghani people any kind of order was a relief from the chaos that America had caused. America and the west bought the situation in Afghanistan upon itself by carelessly exploiting developing countries around the world. Imagine how different life would be presently if the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan had survived.Our Governments are to blame for the current situation, for Al Qaeda, for Osama and for all of our brave soldiers returning home in boxes.
    Complete crap. You conveniently miss out that Afghanistan WAS NEVER STABLE as a nation and in the 1970's it deposed it's King Zahir Shah and several years later aligned itself with the USSR. At that time the cold war was in effect so the USA acted accordingly.

    You need to revisit some books dude. :yes:
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    (Original post by Neo Con)
    Complete crap. You conveniently miss out that Afghanistan WAS NEVER STABLE as a nation and in the 1970's it deposed it's King Zahir Shah and several years later aligned itself with the USSR. At that time the cold war was in effect so the USA acted accordingly.

    You need to revisit some books dude. :yes:


    Yes, it deposed it's King Zahir Shah, eventually becoming a Democracy. America tried to take advantage of this by using the mujahadeen to provoke the Soviets who had existed peacefully with the new Government.

    Which "books" should i revisit "dude" because i would be happy to reccommend you a few.

    Ghost Wars, Steve Coll- Recounts the CIA's involvement with Afghanistan and the Muj.

    Afghanistan, a modern history- Does exactly what it says on the tin, in a non-biased way.

    A Foreign policy of freedom: peace, commerceand friendship - A collection of congressional speeches by the representative of Texas, cronicling American foreign policy from 1973 until the present day. A very reliable and informative read, i would highly reccomend it.

    There are many, many more. I suggest you at least have a look as judging from your above post you have just skimmed through the wikipedia article. Which as you said earlier is not the most reliable of sources
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    Yes, it deposed it's King Zahir Shah, eventually becoming a Democracy. America tried to take advantage of this by using the mujahadeen to provoke the Soviets who had existed peacefully with the new Government.
    :rofl: If that is what you have learnt, please do some more reading. The government was NOT DEMOCRATIC, was NOT POPULAR, was being kept in power by the USSR. This was hardly fair on the afghan people. Sure what the US did was not exactly fair either, but like i said it was the cold war, the mujahidin were the lesser of the 2 evils.

    You deserve a few good slaps for what you are spewing, might knock some sense into you :yes:
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    (Original post by Neo Con)
    :rofl: If that is what you have learnt, please do some more reading. The government was NOT DEMOCRATIC, was NOT POPULAR, was being kept in power by the USSR. This was hardly fair on the afghan people. Sure what the US did was not exactly fair either, but like i said it was the cold war, the mujahidin were the lesser of the 2 evils.

    :
    please can you provide sources, where are you getting your information from?

    The PDPA fought for womens rights in Afghanistan including education, and allowed them to become involved in political life. They introduced land reforms and succesfully bolstered the economy of Afghanistan. Not only this but they also fought to permit freedom of religion.

    The only people that the Government was not popular with were the hardline Islamic fundamentalists, who wished to curtail the rights of women and force them into subhuman status, the smae men who would kill those who they saw as infidels. The same men who would later become the Taliban. These are the men who America supported in the overthrow of the Government.

    So you are saying that these tyrants, these men who would make women subhuman, who would kill in the name of religion, were the lesser of two evils

    But you were denouncing these men as evil just a moment ago saying our troops were fighting a just cause because they are inhumane.

    So what is it NeoCon? Do you support democracy and freedom which is what the PDPA tried to introduce?

    Or do you support tyrants, bullies and fundamentalists, which you say was the lesser of two evils?
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    please can you provide sources, where are you getting your information from?

    The PDPA fought for womens rights in Afghanistan including education, and allowed them to become involved in political life. They introduced land reforms and succesfully bolstered the economy of Afghanistan. Not only this but they also fought to permit freedom of religion.

    The only people that the Government was not popular with were the hardline Islamic fundamentalists, who wished to curtail the rights of women and force them into subhuman status, the smae men who would kill those who they saw as infidels. The same men who would later become the Taliban. These are the men who America supported in the overthrow of the Government.

    So you are saying that these tyrants, these men who would make women subhuman, who would kill in the name of religion, were the lesser of two evils

    But you were denouncing these men as evil just a moment ago saying our troops were fighting a just cause because they are inhumane.

    So what is it NeoCon? Do you support democracy and freedom which is what the PDPA tried to introduce?

    Or do you support tyrants, bullies and fundamentalists, which you say was the lesser of two evils?
    You misunderstand me. I meant lesser of the 2 evils when comparing USSR to the subsequent problem of supporting the Mujahideen. The cold war took importance.
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    (Original post by Neo Con)
    You misunderstand me. I meant lesser of the 2 evils when comparing USSR to the subsequent problem of supporting the Mujahideen. The cold war took importance.


    The cold war (on Americas part anyway) was pure hypocricy. You are aware that while the CIA were funding the Muj, the American Government was lending billions of dollars to the Soviets?

    So what do you think were the reasons that justified the deaths of 2 milllion Afghans in that conflict?

    You are oversimplifying what was an incrediblly comlicated, sinister hypocritical international incident.
 
 
 
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