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    (Original post by WithFlyingColours)
    One found it too difficult and dropped out after the first year, he's now a captain at BA on 777s, so this was quite some time ago! I don't know his academic background so it's hard to take much from that as difficulty is subjective. The other is also a pilot, he said not to assume that because I love flying and aviation that I'd like an engineering degree in it. He also said he felt he was worked harder than other engineering students doing other disciplines and commented on the maths being very tough - again, subjective and I'm sure the maths in most disciplines is there or there abouts. Overall, based on what people have said to me I feel it would be best to perhaps keep it as broad as possible and decide having studied engineering for a year or two what to specialise in.

    Don't let me put you off, because maybe you'd really like aerospace, it's just nice to hear as many opinions as possible to make up your own mind.
    You're probably right about keeping it broad, I guess I'll do some more research (ask around at pprune.org is well) before finally deciding.

    I'm intrigued on how they managed to find the funds to source their training after university, do you know?
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    (Original post by ElegantElephant™)
    You're probably right about keeping it broad, I guess I'll do some more research (ask around at pprune.org is well) before finally deciding.

    I'm intrigued on how they managed to find the funds to source their training after university, do you know?
    PPrune is good, I used to go on frequently though I haven't recently because I'm sick and tired of hearing all the doom and gloom about the recession and airlines struggling etc.

    It used to be (up until last year) that banks weren't that stringent on a loan as big as 60k, which is the maximum most flight training organisations offer. OAA had an agreement with HSBC and I think CTC did aswell, so most of their students made use of that. Nowadays though, of course the banks are treading carefully and seeing as job prospects for low hour pilots are dire, I'd be very surprised if any loans are being given at the moment. When they were though, I remember it being said that having a degree is seen as good insurance against the loans because you have access to a graduate salary should you fail to find employment as a pilot. Some people also use their parents' house as insurance for the loan, though I don't agree with that personally!
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    (Original post by c.m0000)
    WOW, how did he raise £80,000 and how old is he ??
    From what I remember looking at Oxford Aviation Academy they give you a £60,000 loan which you start to repay it 18 months after you finish training. I think a lot of people join the RAF and go into airline flying aterwards. I know someone who did a Geography degree and got their last year of university sponsored by the RAF because he wanted to be a pilot.
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    (Original post by WithFlyingColours)
    PPrune is good, I used to go on frequently though I haven't recently because I'm sick and tired of hearing all the doom and gloom about the recession and airlines struggling etc.

    It used to be (up until last year) that banks weren't that stringent on a loan as big as 60k, which is the maximum most flight training organisations offer. OAA had an agreement with HSBC and I think CTC did aswell, so most of their students made use of that. Nowadays though, of course the banks are treading carefully and seeing as job prospects for low hour pilots are dire, I'd be very surprised if any loans are being given at the moment. When they were though, I remember it being said that having a degree is seen as good insurance against the loans because you have access to a graduate salary should you fail to find employment as a pilot. Some people also use their parents' house as insurance for the loan, though I don't agree with that personally!
    Yup, I'm definitely steering well clear in terms of my parents assets, I'd rather fund it myself than put their hard earned funds at risk. If the economy doesn't pick up in a few years time I'll probably keep the secondary career and do flying on the side as a hobby with a PPL. Fingers crossed it will.
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    (Original post by sophia.maria)
    From what I remember looking at Oxford Aviation Academy they give you a £60,000 loan which you start to repay it 18 months after you finish training. I think most people join the RAF and go into airline flying aterwards. I know someone who did a Geography degree and got their last year of university sponsored by the RAF because he wanted to be a pilot.
    Hmm, not really. Maybe back in the day, but nowadays seeing as minimum duty for a pilot is 18 years, those whose aim is commercial aviation go straight for that rather than join the RAF. If you joined the RAF with the mindset of using it a stepping-stone, you would be weeded out very early on in selection. I personally am not particularly hung up on military aviation, and having been in the ATC for a year (I hated it bar the very occassional flying) I'm not going to be persuing a military career!

    Another thing people should note is that training with a big FTO like OAA isn't the only way. It can also be done for half the price (modular), though it's a big source of disagreement as to what way is better amongst pilots and trainee pilots. It's all personal preference.
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    If you are starting training you are mad! Yes very well, you can train to become a pilot now but you're only going to be finding yourself in a holding pool for the next few years yet having this awesome debt of around £100k taking into account interest at 2.5% i think HSBC with OAA are charging. CTC's bank pulled out due to the current climate but have found a new replacement. Employment is dead right now, i know someone who came out of training at got a 6 month contract (summer) with easyjet but will get booted out in september as contracting pilots is a new scheme adopted to try and get some pilots flowing again.
    What people also forget it yes, if you graduate you are a qualifed pilot on twin engine aircraft but you need the type rating with costs thousands and with very few jobs on the go, airlines will be picky as they wish meaning they'll only consider you if you have a type rating that they won't fund which they did when times were much better.

    My plan is head to uni to do aeronautical engineering, pass 5 or so years there, graduate hopefully, possibly pilot training then if not use my degree to raise funds to put towards flying - minimising the debt ad then head into the industry when things are looking up.
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    (Original post by ElegantElephant™)
    Not everyone would be willing to go through the military route tbh, including me. It has too many other elements chucked in. Joined the ATC for a few months, absolutely hated it, not for me
    You've missed an important note out in that the millitary is a much harder route to get into flying. The RAF get thousands of applicants for pilot, who have wanted to do it their whole lifes, and they would soon weed out those looking for free flying training.

    Thats assuming you pass the rigourous aptitude tests and the stringent medical.

    Further assuming you pass the 4 day officer selection course, as you are an officer in the millitary before you are a pilot.

    Then you pass a year of Officer training.

    Then you pass the RAF's VERY VERY demanding training pipeline - remember here, they are paying you to learn, not you paying them, so if your no good you get chopped - and this can happen at any stage. The training to combat ready can be anything up to 5 years.

    You are also required to join the RAF for a minimum service period (currently i think this is 12 years), and if once you complete your training and a couple of tours, you get given a desk job....tough s**t. Your stuck doing what they tell you.

    Finally, you've passed aptitude, medical, have the leadership and personality to be an officer, pass the year long Initial officer training, complete your years of flying training (potentially holding in desk jobs on the way), do a tour or two, sit behind a desk for a bit, maybe get some more flying in and finally get let out to apply for your airline job................

    Only to be rejected because you havent got any experience of flying as a crew. Airlines are being that selective now, that even ex- RAF pilots who used to walk into jobs arent any more.

    So for anyone who thinks they will use the RAF as a steping stone...think again.
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    Just a quick note.

    If you want to do the RAF then civil, if you are a pilot in the raf then you are a pilot by specialisation, but also an officer. thats your main job.

    Talked to many people through the raf through visits and they would be lucky (after training of course) to get up more than once a week. Most of the time they are occupied with squadron duties, money, planning and general raf and military duties.

    Unlike being an airline pilot where you could have 5+ flights a day if going short haul.

    Aero eng is interesting. But its hard. Its complicated, very mathematical and requires a lot of effort and motivation to learn all these things, pass exams, and know in the back of your head you will probably never use half the stuff you learn anyway. But you must learn it all!!!!

    Lifes a ball.
 
 
 
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