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    well i started buying my stationery for my AS levels this weekend and i couldnt decide whether a book or folder would be more suited for my spanish vocabulary. At GCSE our teacher near enough forced us to use books but after the mocks i changed to a folder because i dont like it when my vocabulary is not in order. Next year i am going to have 3 teachers and so i cant see how a book would work =\ the only problem is that i am staying at the same school with the same teachers and at the induction they mentioned using books for vocabulary and i dont want to offend them at the start of the year.
    I just wondered whether you all use books or folders and if you had any suggestions?
    Thanks =D
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    Folder! Use lined paper in class... If your teacher asks why then tell him/her what you told us? You have a pretty valid reason for wanting to use one...
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    Is this just for vocab lists or for general class work?

    Most people in my class used folders and lined paper as the above poster said. But I didn't want that 'cos I prefer to have things fixed and on smaller pages. It was great, I still put the date and title on every page & it made revision tonnes easier, unlike my compadres who were sitting with hefty folders on the bus, loose pages and manically searching through them.

    My teachers did :eek: though when I asked for an exercise book! Hahaha

    edit: I don't understand how you wouldn't have your work in order in an exercise book!?! The teachers plan the lessons to follow a progressive order.
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    (Original post by mammamia:0)
    well i started buying my stationery for my AS levels this weekend and i couldnt decide whether a book or folder would be more suited for my spanish vocabulary. At GCSE our teacher near enough forced us to use books but after the mocks i changed to a folder because i dont like it when my vocabulary is not in order. Next year i am going to have 3 teachers and so i cant see how a book would work =\ the only problem is that i am staying at the same school with the same teachers and at the induction they mentioned using books for vocabulary and i dont want to offend them at the start of the year.
    I just wondered whether you all use books or folders and if you had any suggestions?
    Thanks =D
    I've found that a good thing to do is to use a small book to note down vocabulary in lessons and then to digitise it using a computer-based vocab program (I'm on a Mac so I use ProVoc). Any program's a really useful way to keep up to date, as well as having sorting options to focus on words that you need to know.

    Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by Languages Nutter)
    I've found that a good thing to do is to use a small book to note down vocabulary in lessons and then to digitise it using a computer-based vocab program (I'm on a Mac so I use ProVoc). Any program's a really useful way to keep up to date, as well as having sorting options to focus on words that you need to know.

    Hope this helps!

    Double the work, surely?
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    (Original post by KayleeLand)
    Double the work, surely?
    True, but each time I write a word out (or even type it) helps me to absorb it. A lot of vocab testers also allow you to track your progress over time, which is always useful in charting how far you've come.

    The other thing that I find is that, if I am learning vocab from a list it's difficult to avoid learning each item in relation to its position on the list (ie. I could learn that a word "comes after" another word rather than learning its meaning as a separate unit); the ability of these programs to test in a random order is helpful with this.
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    (Original post by Languages Nutter)
    True, but each time I write a word out (or even type it) helps me to absorb it. A lot of vocab testers also allow you to track your progress over time, which is always useful in charting how far you've come.

    The other thing that I find is that, if I am learning vocab from a list it's difficult to avoid learning each item in relation to its position on the list (ie. I could learn that a word "comes after" another word rather than learning its meaning as a separate unit); the ability of these programs to test in a random order is helpful with this.
    Yes I can clearly see the benefits, but personally I would this sort of program as a revision aid and not to make my general vocab lists.
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    For vocab I use a telephone book - those words that begin with A in the A section and those that begin with B in the B section etc. Or another way that I have seen is people use revision cards with the letters on the top in the same fashion as you can easily add more revision cars when one letter gets full.

    Some people noted them down on pieces of paper and then file them under certain topics at A level. So when it comes to revision you'd have a concise set of vicab for each topic - like a personalised mot a mot (I don't know the Spanish version sorry!).
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    (Original post by etudiant)
    mot a mot (I don't know the Spanish version sorry!).
    *palabra por palabra.
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    why would it offend them? Everyone has different ways of learning that suit them, just explain that you prefer it that way and it should be fine.
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    I've just finished AS. It is much easier to write in a book. Our teacher tends to talk in French and we stop and ask her what she just said means and note it down in a book, it is much easier for random vocabulary. I took this book to Paris with me! It really helped and I did write somethings in it.

    If I had a vocab test, then I wrote it out on a seperate piece of paper and kept it in my revision folder. If we wanted vocabulary for certain sections, our teacher would have a brainstorming lesson with us, which I wrote on a seperate piece of paper, and put it in my folder. I also wrote out the end of chapter vocab lists and put them on pieces of paper.

    In conclusion, use both. :p:
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    Why not flash cards?
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Why not flash cards?
    Yeh I've used those little A6 cards for revision, fitting certain aspects of topics on them, concept mapping etc... Really good, but I'd say they weren't that practical for class work though.
 
 
 
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