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    Basically...get out more!!! Being couped up at home in self-pity doesn't do you ANY favours whatsoever from my experience.

    Attend every party/gathering you can. Organise gatherings yourself. Ask your mates to come and do something. Basically, make sure your socialising and your not alone as much as possible.

    I did this, found a new group of friends and now have an amazing girlfriend. Couldn't be happier
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    The mind is the most powerful tool you have against depression and the likes. If you think and mope about depressed - you will, unsurprisingly, be depressed.

    If you try and act and feel happy you will become so. Issues will be there that try to drag you down but you have to keep a positive attitude.

    Go out and get some exercise. Get a routine, some near the end of the day for you to look forward t. Anything but laying there in bed thinking about how much the world hates you, imagining scenarios in your head about how you want things to be.
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    I'm still taking anti d's, but they are working and i am feeling like my old self again
    It began in 2006 when i went away from uni.
    Towards the end of that year, my boyfriend of two years (and that i had been long distancing with while i was at uni) began being horrible to me and i couldnt find out why as i was at the opposite end of the country.
    I was stressed from exams, upset with my deteriorating relationship, looking after my best mate that had just been cheated on, and i was losing interest in my course. At the end of that year i flew back home and my boyfriend broke up with me, however over the following weeks he kept trying to meet up so i was very confused. I couldnt eat, ended up 46kg for a while, didnt go back to my course and was in denial for two years. I dont know what clicked but one day i picked up the phone and rang my doctor. She put my on fluoxetine and then citalopram-one i was on the right drug and dose they took 10 weeks to work.
    I also saw a counsellor who said he couldnt help me-but by that point determination kicked in.
    Its been over a year on meds, i am happy, am back to eating, have a wonderful new relationship and have began a new course doing social work which i am loving.
    Training the mind is key, only the sufferer can decide when to get help. When they do they need to do everything in their power to help themselves
    Im a much stronger, happier person from suffering depression. Coming out the other side is worth it:yes:
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    Anti-depressants are helping me :awesome: ..speak to your doctor.

    But no, seriously, spend as much time doing stuff as possible. The more time you spend in bed/lying on the sofa/mooching around the house the worse you'll feel. Tell your friends what's going on, then even when you feel a bit **** and down, they know to drag you out, and you'll feel better for it. Don't keep putting off stuff, just get on with it :yep:
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    Well I was totally cured by getting a girlfriend. Even after breaking up with her I feel ok. I guess I'm a bit "down" at the moment, but far from depressed like I used to be.
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    I'm in the process of joining a gym(waiting on doctors note), i've been going to fitness classes, going to the cinema, going to work. Doing anything which keeps me away from my bedroom for days on end. I still feel really down but i can feel it getting lighter.
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    ~The simple things. Writing a journal addressing how I feel. Reading good books. Sitting in the sunshine when possible. Eating well. Excercising. I was with my boyfriend when I was at my worst but I never really felt he properly understood which I can understand because it is difficult to really know unless you've been there but I had a massive argument with my boyfriend because he felt he couldn't trust me and then I just fully broke down into hysterics and made him listen to me tell him exactly how my condition has affected my self esteem and confidence and made me a lot more needy and every since he has been a lot more involved and affection to me giving me more attention and in turn I have become less clingy and our relationship has gone from strength to strength. Just letting someone in and knowing that they still love me even though sometimes I can be a complete confused and distorted mess helped me feel more worthy and I have not seen the black dog for a good for months now.
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    It would be good to see some success stories

    As for myself, as me in a few years time when i might have eventually recovered I suffer from re-occurant depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder. Have streuggled with deoression since i was 11 (I'm 22 now). That said i am better now i'm under treatment and despite having untreated depression i did manage to finish my course and graduate from uni with a 2:2
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    Well...there are so many people who suffer from depression every day. The rate is even higher in students. This may be due to stress regarding studies, family problems, economic problems, or any other personal problems. The main intention of students is to beat out the stress & refresh the mind.
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    I don't think I have very severe depression but my advice is just to try and do something. In my case, making new friends in a new group boasted my confidence massively. I'm very shy and was very lonely; in the group I was in before always felt as though I must be boring or horrible, because I rarely spoke and I had nothing in common with them. This made me very insecure and miserable but with new friends, I became so much happier and it improved other areas of my life too.
    Think about what it is that makes you so depressed and see if you can change it. And always remember that things do get better. Don't give up hope.
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    The report on this website about historical figures who battled it, is quite interesting:

    http://www.time-to-change.org.uk/wha...-world-without
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    I forced myself to do stuff, stopped drinking every day, got a healthy diet and exercised.

    Better than any ******** counselling or antidepressants, pretty sure in a high percentage of cases where people are on antidepressants they should really be doing what I did.
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    (Original post by orangeboy)
    There's millions of threads on here saying how depressed people are and how crap it is for them.

    I suffer from it also.

    Place your success stories here, how you combatted it, what sort of depression did you have, how did you get it, winning formulas.... everyone's different.

    I and people who have suffered depression will not appreciate comments such as 'just be happy' or 'get over it'.... pure ignorant and haven't a clue.

    Anyway... down to you.
    I'm not sure if I've ever suffered from depression, I've never been to a doctor or counsellor, but I have had periods in my life where I've been extremely low. My first low point was 2002, I had just finished school, my dad died, my first girlfriend dumped me, and I failed two medicals for the Royal Navy, which I had my heart set on joining. I couldn't get a job as I had no work experience and no confidence and it was too late to enrol at college.

    My mum enrolled me on the Prince's Trust 12 week self-development course in January 2003 and that changed my life. It gave me confidence (I was really shy at that point), made me ambitious, and motivated me.

    Since finishing the course, I've been to college (where I got top grades in contrast to my school grades which were pretty poor); graduated from university with a 2.1 Law degree; worked at Walt Disney World in America, and sailed with the Tall Ships Youth Trust in Norway. I've also been involved with alot of voluntary work, I've volunteered in a charity shop, high school, hospital and I'm currently volunteering at the Citizens Advice Bureau where I'm training to be an advisor.

    Despite the massive influence the course had on me, it's hard to maintain that level of motivation as life inevitably grinds you down over time, and I no longer had my team leader or team mates to support me. I also lost my step father to Cancer in 2008 and was attacked and hospitalised in 2006 and 2007 which had an impact on my mental health. I was drinking heavily by this point as well. Wouldn't describe myself as an alcoholic, but I definitely had a drink problem.

    Getting attacked was a big turning point for me. After the second attack, I became extremely paranoid, living each day wondering whether it would be my last. I wore a bullet proof vest for stab protection and kept thinking 'what's the point in studying at uni, if I could step out of my door and be killed tomorrrow?'

    I couldn't handle living my life in fear all of the time so I decided to confront and overcome my fears, after reading 'Fear-the friend of exceptional people' by Geoff Thompson.

    I learnt that fear is all the same, whether you're getting attacked, in a job interview or jumping out of a plane, it's the same feeling (adrenaline), just with varying degrees of intensity. I realised that by confronting a big fear, such as a fear of heights, I could learn how to cope with those feelings in other situations, such as getting attacked.

    I first attempted the challenge by climbing the top mast of this ship on my Tall Ships voyage: http://sailing-ships.oktett.net/stav...archos-tsr.jpg

    I then did a 14,000ft tandem skydive and a 150ft abseil for charity. Confronting a big fear transformed all other areas of my life. I wrote a letter to Prince Charles, thanking him for changing my life through the Prince's Trust course. I had often wrote this letter but kept binning it, thinking it would never get read nor replied to. I realised that it was just my lack of self-belief holding me back so I decided to send the letter one day and I received a reply. This made me realise that nothing is impossible and that the only person holding me back in life was myself.

    Spurred on by this, I contacted Fiona Phillips at the Daily Mirror Newspaper, and she wrote an article about me which can be viewed online here: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news-old/col...5875-20640586/

    This article led to me getting a 2 week work experience placement at a big Law Firm and the opportunity to write an article for the Metro Newspaper. The choice of topic was my own, subject to the editor's approval so I decided to write one on overcoming fear, drawing from my own experience. I interviewed Geoff Thompson for the article, the guy whose book on fear had inspired me:

    http://www.metro.co.uk/lifestyle/art...in_page_id=194

    Inspired by Geoff's help, I started reading all of the articles on his website http://www.geoffthompson.com and they completely changed my way of thinking, and my life. They gave me so much inspiration and motivation and I started reading self-help books, by other author's, will also inspired me.

    As well as overcoming my fear of heights, I went back to college and got my adult numeracy certificates level 1 and level 2, as maths has been the subject I've always avoided and struggled with. I'm currently re-taking my maths GCSE at night college. I was also on Jo Whiley's Radio One 'Changing Track' last year. The inspiration is still running high and I'm running my first marathon in April, and starting Law School in September. Also been teetotal since July last year.

    The 'success' I've had in my life has been down to self-development courses like the Prince's Trust and Tall Ships Youth Trust, and down to reading self-help books and Geoff's articles. Anybody can achieve what I've done. These same opportunities are available to everyone.
 
 
 
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