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    This is something I read about gravity http://www.newscientist.com/article/...y-so-weak.html,
    and I think I have come up with a different explanation of why it is ..

    Basically , according to einstein's theory of relativity gravity is the curvature of space time.Now at the beginning (when the big bang was about to occur) I think gravity would have been quite stronger than it is now ( imagine a piece of cloth and 4 people holding each corner of the cloth , surely the curvature of the bulging of the cloth will be the greatest when the four people are closest to each other and as they move further away the cloth become stretched and the bulging of the cloth becomes less as the cloth becomes more tense.)

    Comparing the piece of cloth to the space time and the people moving away to the expansion of the universe would it be reasonable to say that the expansion of the universe caused the gravity to be weak as we know of today. And it would it get weaker as the universe sets to expand..

    I would like to hear what you guys think , if it makes any sense...
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    While gravity can be said to be caused by the curvature of space-time, mass is still the source (sink) of a gravitational field, and I'm not sure how your analogy handles that.
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    Well currently gravity has only been tested on relatively large "small scales" (of the order of mm) compared with other physical scales (i.e. radius of H atom, radius of proton...) so physicists aren't even sure if GR is valid on the smallest scales which would of existed at the earliest times in the universe.
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    (Original post by div curl F = 0)
    Well currently gravity has only been tested on relatively large "small scales" (of the order of mm) compared with other physical scales (i.e. radius of H atom, radius of proton...) so physicists aren't even sure if GR is valid on the smallest scales which would of existed at the earliest times in the universe.
    That would be almost impossible to show gravity would exist in such small scales and is that the only things necessary??. What about the conditions in the early universe like infinitely hot and infinitely dense how would they prove gravity can exist in those conditions??
 
 
 
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