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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    What?
    she was an awful but famous nurse who came to realise she was a political prop who had caused a lot of excess deaths as a result, and became very depressed.
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    That hat/wife one that everyone mentions, that I can't remember the real name of.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    That hat/wife one that everyone mentions, that I can't remember the real name of.
    "The man who mistook his wife for a hat"? (oliver sacks I think is the author)
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    she was an awful but famous nurse who came to realise she was a political prop who had caused a lot of excess deaths as a result, and became very depressed.
    Do you have evidence for this?
    Nightingale revolutionised the nursing system, introducing specially trained nurses and emphasising the importance of hygiene and sanitary conditions in hospitals. This was despite the strong social stigma against nursing as a profession and a chronic lack of funds.
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    Do you have evidence for this?
    Nightingale revolutionised the nursing system, introducing specially trained nurses and emphasising the importance of hygiene and sanitary conditions in hospitals. This was despite the strong social stigma against nursing as a profession and a chronic lack of funds.
    She only turned to this during her later career - after she had realised how many people she had killed. Heck, the british high commission sent out a group to find out why the mortality in nightingales hospitals was so high. it was THEY who pushed for snaitation etc.

    It was only when she got back and compiled the data she realised how many 'souls' she had lost as a result of shoddy practices.

    Go have a look at the florence nightingale museum, in the bowels of my hospital - St Thomas. Its quite fascinating.
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    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    It depends what you're into. I got really interested in NHS Policy and Economics, so I read "NHS PLC" by Allyson Pollock (and I've also got "The Political Economy of Health Care" by Julian Tudor Hart). I also find the history of medicine quite interesting; "The Knife Man" by Wendy Moore was good and you can get it quite cheaply on Amazon - it's a biography of the 18th Century pioneering surgeon John Hunter. A visit to the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons in London accompanies the book nicely! Roy Porter's books are generally recommended for history also. I've also got a couple of books on medical ethics: "The Value of Life" by John Harris and "Classic Cases in Medical Ethics" if that interests you. During my first year of wannabe-med-student-dreaming I read lots of medical memoirs, there's LOADS about and good for a bit of light reading.

    But, 100% recommended, most of all, the book that you MUST read is "Bad Science" by Ben Goldacre. An awesome book about how journalists are the scum of the earth - when they're not bothering to report medical stories accurately, they're just making them up.

    PS. Just remembered you said you were into psychology - you could try Richard Bentall's "Madness Explained," it's about schizophrenia. Also "The Loss of Sadness: How psychiatry transformed normal sorrow into depressive disorder by Allan V. Horwitz and Jerome C. Wakefield" is a fantastic book about why they believe depression is over-diagnosed, and it also contains some great critiques of recent depression research. It's written in a way accessible to non-psychologists, and I really suggest you read it as it's very relevent to current mental health issues (and their politics!). I'm considering buying my own copy for posterity instead of attempting to steal the library copy...


    Bad Science might just be my favourite book
    I got it from my mate for my bday. It was hilarious, and made me appreciate science more.


    Thanks to everyone so far who has made suggestions.
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    Atul Gawande's 'Complications' and Better' are two great books.
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    (Original post by jazzyyazzy6)
    Hi guys, just wondering if anyone has got any good book recommendations for me. I'm a prospective medical student who also loves reading. I read so much that I thought that I should start reading medical related literature, seeing as when i get to interview they won't appreciate me garbling on about how much I prefer Joyce's Portrait of Young man to Ulysses.

    Has anyone got any favourites that they'd like to recommend? I'm not talking BMJ, New Scientist etc, but actually books. I'm really interested in medical sciences, and also the science behind mental illness in particular, though I'm really open to anything, my interests are vast.

    Thanks in advance.
    You sound like a good egg. Glad someone appreciates the vastness of things and has broad interests.
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    This probably doesn't classify as medical literature, but I recently read "A Spot of Bother" by Mark Haddon (of "The Curious Incident of the dog in the night time" fame) and it was one of the most entertaining books i've read in a while. Have a look at it on amazon. There are lots of wierd and wonderful things that happen in the book, but one of the characters develops a sinister looking lesion which drives him to do all manner of things...
 
 
 
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