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Do you sometimes doubt your intelligence for Post Grad studies? Watch

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    I think the feeling of self doubt is a natural reaction to the educational process that we are immersed in. We read papers and books by professional researcher and eminent academics, deferring by citation to their authority and in doing so wrongly judge our own work on the scholastic excellence of titans. Instead of feeling demoralised by our inadequacies in making these unfair comparisons we should instead look at where we have come from and progress we have made, if a comparison is to be made, it should be from the perspective of where we have been to where we are now.
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    I also have worried about being intelligent enough to complete my PhD at least once a day this entire summer. I try to remind myself that even if i'm not exactly brilliant I am at least organised and hardworking enough to see me through any tough spots. You should identify your non-intelligence based strengths and know that you can use them to overcome difficultys.
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    (Original post by DaveRo)
    I think the feeling of self doubt is a natural reaction to the educational process that we are immersed in. We read papers and books by professional researcher and eminent academics, deferring by citation to their authority and in doing so wrongly judge our own work on the scholastic excellence of titans. Instead of feeling demoralised by our inadequacies in making these unfair comparisons we should instead look at where we have come from and progress we have made, if a comparison is to be made, it should be from the perspective of where we have been to where we are now.
    Totally agree with that too!

    For those you doubting ability - go and read your first year work that you handed in and it actually did ok. It'll a.) make you wonder what the hell you thinking when you handed in something so bad and b.) just how much you've improved. I go and read my UG work when I'm having a bad "I can't do it, why did I ever do an MA" day. It does help with the cheering up process
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    My first post in this forum (although I've been reading posts in it for the last few days!) and this seemed a good place to ask for opinions

    Lately I've started thinking about postgrad study, and I like the idea of continuing my studies and adding something original to the area I've been studying (just finished my 2nd year of Economics)... but need to know more about the nitty and gritty side of things! I'd love to hear opinions from you masters/PhD students on the frustrations, commitments, sacrifices, difficulties etc that you have to come up against. Is focusing on the incredible achievement at the end of it enough to help you get over it? Does it need to be enough to get you over the hurdles you face?
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    (Original post by bazc350)
    My first post in this forum (although I've been reading posts in it for the last few days!) and this seemed a good place to ask for opinions

    Lately I've started thinking about postgrad study, and I like the idea of continuing my studies and adding something original to the area I've been studying (just finished my 2nd year of Economics)... but need to know more about the nitty and gritty side of things! I'd love to hear opinions from you masters/PhD students on the frustrations, commitments, sacrifices, difficulties etc that you have to come up against. Is focusing on the incredible achievement at the end of it enough to help you get over it? Does it need to be enough to get you over the hurdles you face?
    This is probably the wiki link you need to read: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...graduate_study

    It's been put together by a load of us on here who have all had varying experiences - some good, some bad etc. Think one of the most interesting observations is that there seem to be two types of MA students - those who are doing it because it's a requirement for PhD funding and those who are doing it because they just wanted to do another year, don't have any further plans as such.

    For the former student - most of them seem to find MA/MSc courses a drag, a bore, waste of time, unfulfilling, lacking the work load etc etc etc. For the latter student - their courses seem to be really good and really interesting, a step up in some cases (where the former feels almost like going across or even going back a year (that's how I feel for instance) etc etc. So the mindset and opinion of the postgrad experience varies entirely on why you're setting on the expensive process in the first place.
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    There are some great posts here, very helpful and reassuring
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    (Original post by apotoftea)
    This is probably the wiki link you need to read: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...graduate_study

    It's been put together by a load of us on here who have all had varying experiences - some good, some bad etc. Think one of the most interesting observations is that there seem to be two types of MA students - those who are doing it because it's a requirement for PhD funding and those who are doing it because they just wanted to do another year, don't have any further plans as such.

    For the former student - most of them seem to find MA/MSc courses a drag, a bore, waste of time, unfulfilling, lacking the work load etc etc etc. For the latter student - their courses seem to be really good and really interesting, a step up in some cases (where the former feels almost like going across or even going back a year (that's how I feel for instance) etc etc. So the mindset and opinion of the postgrad experience varies entirely on why you're setting on the expensive process in the first place.
    Thanks for that, I did read it, but was hoping for a more 'candid' view of it all I guess- in the form of direct personal experiences perhaps.
 
 
 
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