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    ps... found out by accident, non-white people account for 14% of cambridge students.
    http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/unde...acherguide.pdf (page 2)

    the percentage of the UK population which is non-white was 7.9% in 2001.
    http://www.statistics.gov.uk/CCI/nugget.asp?ID=273

    further, it seems that within ethnic groups there is a great educational divide:

    Highest qualification
    In 2001/02 people from some minority ethnic groups in the United Kingdom were more likely to have degrees (or equivalent) than White people. Those most likely to have degrees were Chinese people, Indians, Black Africans and Other Asians.

    Among men, Black Caribbeans were the least likely to have degrees (8 per cent). Among women, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis were the least likely to have degrees (7 per cent).

    Despite some ethnic groups being more likely than the White population to have a degree, they were also more likely to have no qualifications at all.

    In particular Pakistanis and Bangladeshis were most likely to be unqualified. Nearly half (48 per cent) of Bangladeshi women and 40 per cent of Bangladeshi men had no qualifications. Among Pakistanis, 40 per cent of women and 27 per cent of men had no qualifications.

    bold added
    http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=268
    which obviously complicates the debate further.

    maybe what we should look at is statistics for white people who acheived the appropriate grades compared to non-white people who acheived the appropriate grades to apply... and see if the application/acceptance stats are comparable.



    ps... the above quoted source is really intresting to look at in terms of GCSE acheivements as it shows the different percentage success rates for different ethnicities (Indian girls coming out in the lead, followed by white girls, Indian boys, black girls, white boys... )

    pps... i couldn't find anything on degree class, ethnicity, gender and school background for oxbridge students. i may do this for my year 2 PPS research task. thank you for the inspiration!
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    (Original post by Miss Prankster Pixie)
    further, it seems that within ethnic groups there is a great educational divide:
    ...
    which obviously complicates the debate further.
    I think I vaguely remember reading an interesting article a while ago which was trying to argue that class was a more reliable factor in predicting someone's likelihood to succeed in getting good grades at school than ethnicity. So perhaps the reason for that "educational divide" could be that some ethnic groups' representation within different classes isn't always proportional (i.e. if for some obscure reason Pakistanis in the UK were likely to be upper middle-class but less likely to be lower middle-class, it might produce an effect like that)?:dontknow:
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    (Original post by Miss Prankster Pixie)
    pps... i couldn't find anything on degree class, ethnicity, gender and school background for oxbridge students. i may do this for my year 2 PPS research task. thank you for the inspiration!
    I think if you look at the very detailed admissions breakdown thing published by Oxford, it does show ethnicities, gender and school background. I'm pretty sure I've seen stats about it for my year group (so undergrad entrance 2007). I'll maybe have a hunt round and see if I can find it :yes:

    As for the whole ethnicity and degrees thing, it's a well-known fact within the South Asian community that generally speaking, Pakistani and Bangladeshi families seem to put less emphasis on education than other South Asian backgrounds. I don't know why that is though :dontknow:

    Edit: some stats for 2008! http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...ics/index.html
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    (Original post by Sanyore)
    Not sure how relevant it is, but there's attempts made at the typical outrage even when the opposite, someone gaining a place at Oxford and not at Durham, happens. I remember someone wrote a pretty stubborn letter to The Times fairly recently which basically said "Oxford accepted me, so how dare Durham reject me?" - or something along those lines.
    Incidentally, I met the guy who wrote that letter at my interview. I gather the point of his letter was rather that Durham and other top universities don't interview, which I think is a fair point. His using an Oxbridge offer to insinuate he may have got a place at Durham with an interview typically had the every-top-ten-university-is-as-good-as-Oxford brigade up in arms.
 
 
 
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