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    Has anyone thought about going to Ireland to avoid tuition fees? I'm thinking of applying to Trinity College Dublin for law and political science, but this really a spur of the moment thought and it may come to nothing.

    For people who don't know, Irish unis do not have tuition fees for EU students - like the following countries:

    Iceland
    Luxembourg
    Norway
    Sweden
    Denmark
    Greece
    Germany
    Finland
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    Why would you want to live in a war zone to avoid tuition fees?

    P.S. Also, if you look Romanian then I'm pretty sure you will get your windows smashed and beat up.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    Why would you want to live in a war zone to avoid tuition fees?

    P.S. Also, if you look Romanian then I'm pretty sure you will get your windows smashed and beat up.
    what? don't be a muppet, Ireland is hardly a war zone and that is a ridiculous generalisation, just because a few ******* racist morons from south belfast went on a few nights rampage doesn't meant the whole ******* country is like that....quite the opposite actually.....what a stupid ******* post...
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    Might go for Trinity myself. Was gonna go Berlin, but I dropped German and can't say I speak it well enough to go there.
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    I didn't know and hadn't thought about it OP, so thanks. I knew Scottish unis are free, but only to Scottish students and assumed Wales/Ireland were the same. I'll check it out
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    Trinity is VERY hard to get into though unless you're from Ireland yourself. A lot of my friends struggled to get in and they're from Northern Ireland, never mind England etc.
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    ^ They're still presenting the same grade system as those from England though...why would it be different? It's very difficult to get into for Irish people too, it's difficult when presenting A-Levels because the systems are very hard to equate.

    Anyway- war zone haha yeah because TCD is located smack bang in troubled areas of Belfast and not..Dublin. Also, the government are currently debating bringing in tuition fees since most unis are massivley in debt- TCD more than €7M, UCD more than €10M.
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    (Original post by 19music4)
    Trinity is VERY hard to get into though unless you're from Ireland yourself. A lot of my friends struggled to get in and they're from Northern Ireland, never mind England etc.
    why is it more difficult to get into when you are a Uk student.. surely they cannot be biassed
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    we don't have "tuition fees" but we do have "registration fees" to be paid every year. they were €1000 last year and are probably going to be €1500 this year. the government are seriously considering bringing in tuition fees in sept 2010, which are about €5000/year for arts subjects and €8000/year for science subjects. that's going to sting a british person a lot more than an irish person because our salaries and cost of living are way higher. if you're earning in britain and paying for something in ireland, you're ******.

    also our system screws over british people. we base entry purely on grades. if you take the irish exams and get the top grade in six of your subjects (most people take 7), then you can do any course in any irish university. if british applicants and irish applicants weren't seperated, british ones would have a huge advantage because AAAA is much easier to get than six irish A1s. so there's a certain number of places for british students and if there's 10 places and 12 AAAA applicants, 10 people are just selected in a draw. which is horrible but yeah. and then if there's say 10 places and 8 AAAA aplicants, they'll all get in and the AAAB will be put into a draw and so on. i don't know about your particular course but i think law on its own would be one of the ones with more AAAA candidates than places.

    i'm being very negative so i will say trinity's a fine uni and it's in a really fantastic location bang in the centre of dublin, which is a great city.
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    (Original post by Rocious)
    we don't have "tuition fees" but we do have "registration fees" to be paid every year. they were €1000 last year and are probably going to be €1500 this year. the government are seriously considering bringing in tuition fees in sept 2010, which are about €5000/year for arts subjects and €8000/year for science subjects. that's going to sting a british person a lot more than an irish person because our salaries and cost of living are way higher. if you're earning in britain and paying for something in ireland, you're ******.

    also our system screws over british people. we base entry purely on grades. if you take the irish exams and get the top grade in six of your subjects (most people take 7), then you can do any course in any irish university. if british applicants and irish applicants weren't seperated, british ones would have a huge advantage because AAAA is much easier to get than six irish A1s. so there's a certain number of places for british students and if there's 10 places and 12 AAAA applicants, 10 people are just selected in a draw. which is horrible but yeah. and then if there's say 10 places and 8 AAAA aplicants, they'll all get in and the AAAB will be put into a draw and so on. i don't know about your particular course but i think law on its own would be one of the ones with more AAAA candidates than places.

    i'm being very negative so i will say trinity's a fine uni and it's in a really fantastic location bang in the centre of dublin, which is a great city.

    And also my friend tried to apply (she was doing Biology, History, Religios Studies and ICT (computing)) and they only count the traditional subjects in the 4 A-level subjects. So she didn't get in because she did I. C.T.

    Also, bare in mind that you might have to do a conversion course to work in england or at least my friend said she would have to do a 1 year conversion course to work in Northern Ireland (but she didn't get in anyways.)
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    I don't suppose this tuition fee thing applies to post-graduates?? *hope*
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    (Original post by doivid)
    Has anyone thought about going to Ireland to avoid tuition fees? I'm thinking of applying to Trinity College Dublin for law and political science, but this really a spur of the moment thought and it may come to nothing.

    As a previous poster said although at the moment there are no tuition fees there are massive adminstration and registration fees, as well as the added cost of trying to live in dublin.

    I went to Trinity - I did Political Science - OP did you mean Law or Politics, because I'm fairly certain you can't do a joint honours degree in Law and Political Science at Trinity, in fact the only way to end up with a Political Science pure degree is to do it through BESS, which means you do classes in Sociology, Business and Economics in first year and then start branching out. At least that was the case when I wnet there (finished 2007) This is what I did. And the law course in trinity is one of the most sought after degrees in the entire country, so you'd have to do exceptionally well on your A levels to get accepted on to that.
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    Sure, you could go elsewhere, and then you could even pay no tuition fees, but is it worth it? I personally wouldn't opt to go abroad to study at university-level just because it's cheaper (indeed I actually had this opportunity and turned it down).
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    I looked at the University of Akureyri (Iceland)'s Computer Science course (taught in English), but then decided against it.
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    (Original post by hannah-03)
    And also my friend tried to apply (she was doing Biology, History, Religios Studies and ICT (computing)) and they only count the traditional subjects in the 4 A-level subjects. So she didn't get in because she did I. C.T.


    We don't have any subjects outside of traditional. Therefore it would not be fair for a British student to get the place presenting say Drama, Media Studies, Sociology and ICT ahead of an Irish student with Irish, English, Maths and Physics or something. It's scabby for for your friend if she was applying for it as a back-up and therefore didn't research this thoroughly but if it was always her first choice it would be stupid not to tailor subjects accordingly.
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    (Original post by Rocious)
    we don't have "tuition fees" but we do have "registration fees" to be paid every year. they were €1000 last year and are probably going to be €1500 this year. the government are seriously considering bringing in tuition fees in sept 2010, which are about €5000/year for arts subjects and €8000/year for science subjects. that's going to sting a british person a lot more than an irish person because our salaries and cost of living are way higher. if you're earning in britain and paying for something in ireland, you're ******.

    also our system screws over british people. we base entry purely on grades. if you take the irish exams and get the top grade in six of your subjects (most people take 7), then you can do any course in any irish university. if british applicants and irish applicants weren't seperated, british ones would have a huge advantage because AAAA is much easier to get than six irish A1s. so there's a certain number of places for british students and if there's 10 places and 12 AAAA applicants, 10 people are just selected in a draw. which is horrible but yeah. and then if there's say 10 places and 8 AAAA aplicants, they'll all get in and the AAAB will be put into a draw and so on. i don't know about your particular course but i think law on its own would be one of the ones with more AAAA candidates than places.

    i'm being very negative so i will say trinity's a fine uni and it's in a really fantastic location bang in the centre of dublin, which is a great city.


    Still, it's important to remember that random selection applies to ALL applicants in all courses, not just A-level applicants...
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    We don't have any subjects outside of traditional. Therefore it would not be fair for a British student to get the place presenting say Drama, Media Studies, Sociology and ICT ahead of an Irish student with Irish, English, Maths and Physics or something. It's scabby for for your friend if she was applying for it as a back-up and therefore didn't research this thoroughly but if it was always her first choice it would be stupid not to tailor subjects accordingly.
    No well when I say tried to apply I mean looked into applying but was told that she shouldn't by admissions because she would just get rejected immediately. It's because are school sucks at telling people about the irish unis or most unis in fact (well apart from the ones in Northern Ireland because nearly everyone goes there).
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    Trinity is about the only decent university (yes, yes, I know - a college) in the Irish republic. It's hardly a big one either.
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    Fees are a small part of University expenses. If you go to a Uni outside the UK you can't get a loan or a grant, so accomodation, food etc would all have to be paid out of savings or by parents.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    Why would you want to live in a war zone to avoid tuition fees?

    P.S. Also, if you look Romanian then I'm pretty sure you will get your windows smashed and beat up.
    Um, I think you'll find Dublin is not a war zone..
 
 
 
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