Why do you regret studying medicine? Watch

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Surely_unsure
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#1
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#1
Only answer if you regret choosing to study medicine

Please explain why you regret studying medicine and state what you wish you had chosen to study instead.
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Renal
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#2
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Where's Terp when you need him?
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Fluffy
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#3
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But that doesn't tell you how many people regret it - I imagine it isn't really many... Terp is the only one I can think of on here who is consistent!

Liking or not liking something is really too individual a concept to try to draw parallels from. What turns one person off could be the next persons elixir...

Also, you need to be asking doctors with a few years of experience under their belts this question, as to really regret something you probably need a longer term view of the bigger picture.
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Sarky
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#4
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Terpineol....oh terpineol...
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ThisLittlePiggy
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#5
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#5
The possibility of working with some nurses,like the one who must not be named(especially when the one who must not be named is face palm enducing), is making me regret medicine.

I now wished I had studied the deadly art of kung fu as a way of solving my problem.
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JCM89
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#6
I don't regret it but I hadn't quite realised how abusive some patients can be on the wards. I wasn't expecting patients to treat doctors as saviours but getting spat and swore at takes a little bit of getting used to. Hey ho! All part of life's rich tapestry.
matt^
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im concerned even before i apply that im not going to have a decent family life.

anyone know if there are any specialities that get a better work life / home life balance?
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username153949
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(Original post by matt^)
im concerned even before i apply that im not going to have a decent family life.

anyone know if there are any specialities that get a better work life / home life balance?
GP's
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nexttime
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I'm sometimes jealous of a lot of more 'theoretical' subjects, that seem to work with more difficult concepts rather than high-volume, (relatively) low difficulty knowledge, which was what first year pre-clinical was like. I'd imagine that's just me though!
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username153949
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(Original post by nexttime)
I'm sometimes jealous of a lot of more 'theoretical' subjects, that seem to work with more difficult concepts rather than high-volume, (relatively) low difficulty knowledge, which was what first year pre-clinical was like. I'd imagine that's just me though!
I couldn't agree more! Sometimes i secretly wish medicine was a bit harder, like the concepts...
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Alex D
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#11
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(Original post by billykwok)
I couldn't agree more! Sometimes i secretly wish medicine was a bit harder, like the concepts...
:wtf: :p:
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AEH
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The only thing I wish I could do at the moment which is more difficult with medicine is a degree in History. I'm kinda locked into a career path which I need to be pretty single minded about, at some point I would like to do some proper history, but it would require a career break.
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Wasps26
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#13
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(Original post by AEH)
The only thing I wish I could do at the moment which is more difficult with medicine is a degree in History. I'm kinda locked into a career path which I need to be pretty single minded about, at some point I would like to do some proper history, but it would require a career break.
I'll swap with you! I'm currently on a History degree but I'm desperate to do medicine...just another 3 years to go...:o:
Going from medicine to History would be pretty hard, not in terms of being accepted obviously. But going from History to medicine is pretty hard too, and this time it is being accepted thats the tough bit! :p:
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AEH
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#14
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Nah, I love medicine, its the best job in the world. History is just the only other thing I could happily do a MA in. Medicine does have one particular massive advantage over History at postgraduate level though: Employment.
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Trevor 12345
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(Original post by nexttime)
I'm sometimes jealous of a lot of more 'theoretical' subjects, that seem to work with more difficult concepts rather than high-volume, (relatively) low difficulty knowledge, which was what first year pre-clinical was like. I'd imagine that's just me though!
that was me too, though I actually ended up by dropping out of med school and ultimately taking time out to travel then re-applying for a different course.
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michaela_banana
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#16
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#16
I find it funny that terp's been mentioned 3 times yet I'm the one with the balls to actually drop out! (And Mrm above me)

I regret that for the rest of my academic career I'm going to be lumbered with a BMedSci in Evolutionary Biology, which sounds ridiculous, and makes it very obvious I haven't done my undergrad by a traditional route, meaning that I will never be able to escape being a drop out.

I also wish I had spent a lot more time thinking about other options instead of medicine. I feel my school/parents/myself lumbered me with a maths vs. medicine debate from about 12 and other options weren't seen as as "good". I'm from a very rural area and the only degree educated people I knew were teachers and doctors. Perhaps if I knew more about being a research scientist I would have considered it sooner, rather than discovering it too late.
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Sarky
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(Original post by michaela_banana)
I find it funny that terp's been mentioned 3 times yet I'm the one with the balls to actually drop out! (And Mrm above me)

I regret that for the rest of my academic career I'm going to be lumbered with a BMedSci in Evolutionary Biology, which sounds ridiculous, and makes it very obvious I haven't done my undergrad by a traditional route, meaning that I will never be able to escape being a drop out.

I also wish I had spent a lot more time thinking about other options instead of medicine. I feel my school/parents/myself lumbered me with a maths vs. medicine debate from about 12 and other options weren't seen as as "good". I'm from a very rural area and the only degree educated people I knew were teachers and doctors. Perhaps if I knew more about being a research scientist I would have considered it sooner, rather than discovering it too late.

It's not too late. You realised and did something about it :yes:
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ThisLittlePiggy
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(Original post by michaela_banana)
I find it funny that terp's been mentioned 3 times yet I'm the one with the balls to actually drop out!
This seems like an attack on Terp, which I hope you didn't mean. I think Terp, despite hating medicine, has a game plan and to simply drop out wouldn't suit him.
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terpineol
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#19
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After kindly being PM'd I thought I would don the spandex, swoop in, and rescue this silly applicant from themselves.

Before starting however I would like to doff my hat in the general direction of Miss Bannana for having sufficient moral substance to drop out early and not make so much mess, while sticking with something vaguely medical.



I regret doing medicine for many reasons, after an interesting conversation yesterday I suspect for many of the same reasons my father does.

Firstly and most importantly, you will never make a decent living out of it. Things havn't been great for a generation or two, and are going downhill rapidly. Add into this the difficulties in picking where one ends up and what one ends up doing, and the situation is in essence 'you do something you hate, for pittance a year, and you'll like it or else'.

Secondly the whole subject of patients is really rather dull. With at our last lecturing on the issue 60% of meds not being taken as directed, plus the rest of their abhorrent behavior the NHS is effectively the most epic game of lemmings ever.

The third point, taken from my father (anaesthetist), and interestingly what he now tells every medical student and work experience drone he is sent, is that with the restrictions on what one can do set by cost, timetabling, etc it is really no longer a satisfying job. Decision making being effectively removed from the picture of things, and the whole affair being really rather untaxing in relation to what most people seem to be seeking. He suggests if one is capable of getting into medical school one should hopefully be capable of dealing with far more interesting challenges in the financial or legal sectors.

A plethora of points remain, the god awfully boring nature of effectively memorising log tables for ones exams, at such a rate that all interest and meaning is removed, the holier than thou nature of ones peers (though this can be used for great games), and so on and so forth.


If you really care that much, do VetMed. If you can't get into vetmed do medicine and move to anywhere with an index of social deprivation.
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terpineol
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#20
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Having just realised I didn't put down my thoughts on what else I would do, my current plan is to try and stick medicine out until at least I have my MbChb. Then I shall either defect to law, management, or possibly politics, perhaps though aiming for a sideline in mobile private dermatogy clinics going round the private schools of the country fleecing the eczema market.
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