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  • View Poll Results: Which would you be more inclined to do?
    Three year course (feel that you'll do well, graduate a year earlier)
    8
    23.53%
    Four year course (may open more doors, more employable)
    26
    76.47%

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    i chose option 2..age is just a number get over it
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    (Original post by fourteen)
    Right. So, If you did the four year course, you would graduate at 24 years old :eek:, so it would have taken you six years to get a degree!

    No it wouldn't. It would have taken 4 years.

    Your concept of mathematics is a bit.. odd.
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    i personal who do the one with the year abroad

    but down to you, and what will you be more happy with doing
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    Don't consider your age as a factor in your decision - choose what you want to do based on what you want to do. You're only a teeny tiny bit older than the straight-from-school students (who don't by any stretch of the imagination, make up the whole of the student body) and your age really isn't an issue.
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    What did you do with the other two years?
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    I'm 20 two months after I start which is only normal as anyone else taking a gap year but I'm panicking that if I get offered a deferred place then it's a four year course and then I'll be old by the time I do a Masters or whatever so I know how you feel but don't choose because of it. If you're worried about being old, just do work exp and make sure you get a high classified degree so you can make sure you get a job afterwards asap.
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    24 is still young. I'm 21 just now with another year of uni to go after summer so I'll be graduating when I'm 22. That's only two years younger. There's people in the same year as me who are 40.
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    okay listen up. Take medics for an example, most of them are either 18 or 19 when they go to university (and a medical degree is for 6years) so by the time you graduate you are either 24 or 25.

    Still have a dilemma now?? :P
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    age is just a number
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    It's one year. Why is graduating at 24 any worse than graduating at 23?
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    im starting uni this september and im 23! tbh i feel so much better doing it now thna at 18 so don't worry! x
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    (Original post by fourteen)
    The only difference with medics is that I don't really think they have the worry of being less employable after they finish their education, and they are guaranteed training on their course, pretty much.

    umm believe me they still have that to worry about. Medicine is a highly competetive course for both undergrad and postgrad.

    Anyway i do realise that you're somewhat dishearten by the prospect of getting graduated 'late' but believe me in the long run, it hardly makes a difference.
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    To correct you most medical degrees are 5 years - minus Oxbridge and UCL. Many chose an extra year to do an intercalated degree - giving them a BSc or BMedSc as well.
    Many people chose to do Masters - an extra year - people may chose to do so for extra employment value?
    I don't think it's uncommon.
    Plus most girls like older men! Could be an advantage!?!
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    (Original post by fourteen)
    The only difference with medics is that I don't really think they have the worry of being less employable after they finish their education, and they are guaranteed training on their course, pretty much.
    Stop worrying. Around 25% of students starting their degree are 21 or older. Anything from 18-21 considered the standard age to start a degree, but anything older is still very common.
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    I'll be 20 this year when I start uni too.

    I'll tell you something someone told me when I was worried about the same thing (except with a foundation course). They told me that it doesn't matter that I've taken longer than the average person, I'm just taking a scenic route, and as long as I'm happy and doing well it doesn't matter how old I'll be when I'm finished.

    So ask yourself, what course will you enjoy more?
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    (Original post by fourteen)
    OK guys, I think let's just ignore the age thing at the moment.

    Would you do a degree which you find easier and more likely to do well, over a course which is much harder, but might open more doors? Let's also assume that the three year course has a year abroad in America integrated in it.

    For information sake, the courses are:

    Linguistics (with a year abroad in America)
    or
    Linguistics and French (with a year abroad in France).
    Do the one that's more likely to get you a job. Who the hell cares what age you are when you finish uni?
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    (Original post by fourteen)
    I think I might enjoy the three year course more, but I also have to bear in mind a language will probably open more doors. I really don't know.
    Do the language course. You might really enjoy the year abroad! Plus if you work abroad it's valuable experience.
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    (Original post by fourteen)
    The three year course also has a year abroad btw (in America). I wouldn't be working abroad, most likely studying abroad at a foreign uni.
    Ohh, then the 3 year course!

    Obviously this is your choice though
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    (Original post by fourteen)
    Even if I find the other course more enjoyable and probably will find that I do better on it?
    You'll still be doing the same subject, just with a bit more of a challenge. You have to think about what you'll want to do afterwards; realistically, will you be able to get into the career that you want doing the shorter/'easier' course? How do you know that you'll be able to do better with the shorter course, and not end up procrastinating because you don't have to keep on top of everything so much?
 
 
 
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