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British vs. English/Scottish/Welsh/Irish Watch

  • View Poll Results: Which one?
    British
    78
    39.20%
    English
    53
    26.63%
    Scottish
    26
    13.07%
    Welsh
    15
    7.54%
    Irish
    13
    6.53%
    None
    14
    7.04%

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    British.

    All my grandparents are/were Irish, but I don't feel very Irish at all. My parents were both born in England, and I identify with that far more than my Irishness, but I still feel it's just a bit easier to call myself British.
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    *sigh*

    Irish people are not part of the UK...only Northern Irish. The amount of times i've had to correct people on this is just unreal now lol
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    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    Good example is to illustrate countries that have changed because of war or other issues such as the breakup of Yugoslavia or India.
    Indeed.

    And if we truly erected our borders to be a reflection of separate cultures, then the UK would be composed of many more states than it is.
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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    I really, really don't care what imaginary border I happen to have been born within.
    To be fair Great Britain (i.e. England, Scotland and Wales) is not just an imaginary border, it's a full island.

    But in terms of ethnicity, yeah, who cares. Unless you're Nick Griffin ranting on about not being a white British person but being English who really gives a ****?
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    British. My parents are both English, two of my grandparents are English, two are Scottish, and I was born in Scotland. I don't feel English AT ALL but I don't feel amazingly Scottish either...I guess at the end of the day it doesn't matter and British is a nice compromise.
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    English. I want to see scotland and wales become independent as they are both full of socialists.
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    (Original post by danny d)
    It also seems to me that when people from other countries talk about the British, they are almost always actually referring to the English. For example with food, they associate the British with tea, jam, scones and roast beef whereas to me these are all associated, albeit stereotypically, with English people.
    Er, I'd say they are entirely British. Shockingly enough Scots and, I imagine, Welsh people eat roast beer and jam. As for scones, I always associate them with being more Scottish than English...

    (Original post by 19music4)
    *sigh*

    Irish people are not part of the UK...only Northern Irish. The amount of times i've had to correct people on this is just unreal now lol
    I think everyone knows that, but simply feel it is culturally interconnected with the rest of the British Isles.

    Moreover, in terms of terminology, the British Virgin Islands, for example, have never been part of the UK. Nor, for another example, is British Columbia.
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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    Indeed.

    And if we truly erected our borders to be a reflection of separate cultures, then the UK would be composed of many more states than it is.
    Yeah. I used to study politics but I always find the nations identification a bit simplistic. I'm sure more people have a sense of identity on more regional levels but political textbooks will usually cite Cornwall and that's it, or the failed concept of devolution to the North East. Someone from London can have as much connection to Liverpool as they do to Inverness. London's problem is complex though.
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    well you know....
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    Welsh first, then British.
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    well im technically english so whatcanyado.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Er, I'd say they are entirely British. Shockingly enough Scots and, I imagine, Welsh people eat roast beer and jam. As for scones, I always associate them with being more Scottish than English...
    I didn't say Scots and the Welsh don't eat roast beef and jam. I simply meant that people around the world (by which i mainly mean some naive Americans who think, for example, that Europe is country) use British and English interchangeably without knowing the difference. My point is that when these people say British, they in fact mean English. Whereas if they mean Scottish, they say Scottish (perhaps unaware that Scotland is a part of Britain). I'll accept your scone point and actually jam may not simply be seen as English unless it on sale at a summer fete, but roast beef and, obviously, tea are synonymous with the English and not the British.
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    (Original post by 19music4)
    *sigh*

    Irish people are not part of the UK...only Northern Irish. The amount of times i've had to correct people on this is just unreal now lol
    Some Northern Irish people may consider themselves to be "Irish" as opposed to considering "Northern Irish" as a separate ethnicity. So in that sense Irish can also be a "British" ethnicity because some of the indigenous people of the UK are Irish.

    (Original post by MichaelG)
    well im technically english so whatcanyado.
    And by extension also British.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    And by extension also British.
    it depends if you're talking genetically or culturally, but yes you're right.
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    English. British is too ill-defined now, it covers everything.
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    Unless Northern Irish, someone Irish is absolutely not British. Sorry to go on like a broken record, but I feel staunchly about it.
    I agree with you; someone from the Republic of Ireland is absolutely not British. I am from Northern Ireland and definitely consider myself to be British:p:
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    English. I don't have any English blood in me but I was born and raised here and have never lived anyone else in Britain so...
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    (Original post by Beige_Angel)
    English. I don't have any English blood in me but I was born and raised here and have never lived anyone else in Britain so...
    Again with this 'English' blood thing.

    Argh.
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    British. I'm of Indian ethnicity.
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    (Original post by danny d)
    but roast beef and, obviously, tea are synonymous with the English and not the British.
    Yeah, I'm afraid I just don't agree with you on that one. Tea especially is quintessentially British, not just English to me - about as British as you get without a furry hat and an odd-coloured telephone box.
 
 
 
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