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    Basically I LOVE ART ! Its a hobbie as well as being one of my A levels
    But, I'm feeling really nervous about carrying on with it for university after Alevels and if i choose to do a foundation course.
    Mainly because everyone seems to do this > :banghead: when i say i want to carry on with my art instead of an academic subject like law or geogrpahy. People think its a 'waste of time' and wont get me anywhere or into a job where i'll be able to make any money. Surley its not that bad and many people must be able to make somethig of themselves.
    I come from a small town in eastyorkshire and find it hard to imagain what jobs and oppertunities i could find with art since theres nothing in my area.

    Is art really that much of a gamble ?
    Is there a really high chance that i wont be able to get a job ?
    Which types of art and design have higher graduate employment ie, interior, fine art ?

    help :s
    Any advise welcome

    xxx
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    Who might design a courtroom? Who illustrates maps and charts we see in geography books in school?

    I could spend hours writing up questions that will end up with an answer that falls into something an art and design student might end up doing and I find it worrying that people like mentioned in your post might claim something so important to the foundations and framework of life is wasting time. I know exactly the type of people you're talking about, too, but when you start looking around and seeing how much of our surroundings is affected by art then it's very easy to shrug off the close-minded as idiots.

    Always keep in mind how everything that affects us is a conclusion of art or design or some other driving, creative force; just remember to keep an open mind as to how important other areas of 'academic' learnings are to them as well, such as maths or science, and then you're leaps and bounds ahead of the linear thinkers who believe in one form over the other.

    There's always going to be jobs, though what a 'job' entails is something you'll have to find out for yourself going back to just how vast and deep the art and design world is. People are going to be writing books to be illustrated for hundreds of years from now, musicians creating records to cover, car manufacturers wanting new designs, housings that require concepts, museums and galleries that need filling, situations to be documented, clients that need pictures demonstrating ideas by methods other than words... I'm not even scratching the surface here of how many opputunities for a artist or designer there are out there... I've gone right for the most generic and obvious, if anything.

    I don't know what your A Level course has taught you, but I'm going to out on a limb here and tell you in advance that a Foundation course is going to erase everything the schools have taught you and open you up to whole new worlds of art in comparison. Art at A Level was a bit of a strange step for me but this last year in a Foundation has really changed the way I think about art.
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    Unfortunately, I'm way too tired to respond properly right now. Expect my response sometime tomorrow regarding this. For the time being, there are many opportunities to gain work in the creative industries for those who are socially and technically equipped to enter them.

    I would advise reading this thread in full:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=941763
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    Ah, 61e.CR has now responded (he hadn't before I replied). :smile:
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    (Original post by steph_anie_x)
    Basically I LOVE ART ! Its a hobbie as well as being one of my A levels
    But, I'm feeling really nervous about carrying on with it for university after Alevels and if i choose to do a foundation course.
    Mainly because everyone seems to do this > :banghead: when i say i want to carry on with my art instead of an academic subject like law or geogrpahy. People think its a 'waste of time' and wont get me anywhere or into a job where i'll be able to make any money. Surley its not that bad and many people must be able to make somethig of themselves.
    I come from a small town in eastyorkshire and find it hard to imagain what jobs and oppertunities i could find with art since theres nothing in my area.
    I'm assuming that when you say 'everyone', none of them work in advertising, architecture, fashion, film, software, publishing, television or radio? I'm also assuming that none of them have considered that the aforementioned creative industries collectively contribute the highest GDP in any country in the world? In a nut shell, the people that often overlook 'art and design' are those know a) take it for granted and b) know nothing about it, simply put. As mentioned in my previous post, there are plenty of work opportunities available, even during this poor economy, for graduates who are socially (i.e. have an understanding of their subject and the industry they wish to enter) and technically (can produce artwork to a reasonable standard) equipped to enter them.

    Also, academia and career prospects are not mutually exclusive, nor will an academic subject guarantee a profitable career. Moreover, art and design does possess an academic and theoretical element, where students will be required, in all good undergraduate courses, to attend lectures and write regular essays on art and design history, theory and practice. The misconception that art and design is purely practical is grossly mistaken.

    Is art really that much of a gamble ?
    Yes and no. On the assumption that you're referring to 'art and design' in all its variety, and not exclusively 'fine art' when you say 'art', no it's not a gamble. If you're competent at what you do (whether you're a graphic designer or an architect) and are 'aware' of the industry you're applying to (in other words, observing current vacancies, for example, on a website like YCN, and by applying to work placements before, during, and after your degree), you will highly likely gain your first startup position, possibly earning more than you originally envisaged.

    Is there a really high chance that i wont be able to get a job ?
    Maybe, maybe not. As mentioned in my previous paragraph, this is dependent on 'you', not the creative industries you might apply into.

    Which types of art and design have higher graduate employment ie, interior, fine art ?
    Now, this is the wrong approach. You should not be choosing your artistic practice based upon career prospects, but because you genuinely like it. It would be illogical to become a product designer simply because the prospects are supposedly 'higher'. Therefore, to answer your question, any artistic practice can lead to a profitable career. In my case, when I graduated, I worked in publishing, before moving into advertising. I won't list the companies I worked for, nor my salary, because I wish to maintain my privacy on a forum like this, but it's more than reasonable.

    Starting salaries for art and design graduates, on the whole, will be moderately low to begin with (£15,000 to 25,000), but will exponentially rise with work experience (a senior position, such as an art director, can earn around £45,000 to even 70,000 per annum, depending very much on the individual and employer concerned).

    help :s
    Any advise welcome
    I hope this has helped, and I would show this post to anyone you know that would say otherwise.
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    wow! i never even knew that art would be this intense...
    i too want to take art ..fine art as an undergraduate coures...but i have unfortunatly been unable too..however i am going to try next year for it =)
    this has really helped me realise that even with a fine art degree..i can have a comfortable life... =)
 
 
 
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