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this should put you off binge drinking Watch

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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ink-again.html

    This is pretty startling considering he only drunk for 9 years.....a fraction of what it takes many alcoholics to get anywhere near. But the reason is his young age and without wanting to sound pious with the amount of binge drinking in the teenage generation today this is worth a good read. It takes surpising little to damage your body from alcohol....i was shocked. It's a much more dangerous drug than smoking, cannabis etc imo
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    I can't say I blame them for giving the liver to someone else tbh which may sound horrid but it's the truth.
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    No it doesn't put me off, seriously I don't binge anything to the extent of that guy, and I doubt many people do.
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    22. The lad was only 22, drinking from 13. He never really have much of a chance did he.

    That dailymail comments section sickens me. A load of people who probably dont understand how much alcoholism effects people, passing judgement on a lad of 22, saying who should and shouldn't get treated. It's these people I wouldn't treat, the idiots. There is a comment there along the lines of 'surely there is a more deserving patient' and it has a positive rating of 2000+. What more would they want from him, the lad got a wake up call and started going to AA. Not long after he got seriously ill.
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    He was also fat. He's also ugly.

    Also, thanks to his liver giving in, he's now a Essex-tart shade of yellow!
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    It takes an awful lot to destroy your liver with alcohol; it's just possible to do it in a relatively short space of time if you spend every day drinking heavily. It's almost certainly a more dangerous habit than cannabis, but I'd quibble with the smoking point - the statistics will probably show a far higher mortality (due to the habit) rate in regular smokers than in regular drinkers. Anyone human will feel awfully for the guy and his family, but the rules in place are about as good as they can be. Ultimately, very few people of this age are in the habit of drinking a large quantity of alcohol every day, or even particularly close, so they won't find this news particularly relevant to them.
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    (Original post by DammitBauer)
    22. The lad was only 22, drinking from 13. He never really have much of a chance did he.

    That dailymail comments section sickens me. A load of people who probably dont understand how much alcoholism effects people, passing judgement on a lad of 22, saying who should and shouldn't get treated. It's these people I wouldn't treat, the idiots. There is a comment there along the lines of 'surely there is a more deserving patient' and it has a positive rating of 2000+. What more would they want from him, the lad got a wake up call and started going to AA. Not long after he got seriously ill.
    Well considering they did not give him a liver, instead probably giving it to someone else deemed him a "less deserving patient". Lets see; he started drinking when he was 13 and it progressed to a lot of drinking - so much so he succum to a fatal disease and couldnt get a new liver because he couldn't stop drinking for six months. Yeah, I'm sure that there is someone more deserving of life.

    And the comment about people saying "who and who shouldn't get treated", then claiming that "It's these people I wouldn't treat" is hypocritical is it not?
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    To clarify on the 6 month rule, while it clearly should be reviewed in certain cases, I do agree with it. Anybody who has seen what alcoholism can do to a person will agree that six months is an achievement to be proud of. The point I was trying to get across was the lad never had 6 months to prove he could do it. Illness got hold of him and never let go, killing him not long after.

    On the not treating certain people thing. Ok it does sound hypocritical, but on what stage could it ever be implemented. It was a throw away comment.
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    (Original post by DammitBauer)
    To clarify on the 6 month rule, while it clearly should be reviewed in certain cases, I do agree with it. Anybody who has seen what alcoholism can do to a person will agree that six months is an achievement to be proud of. The point I was trying to get across was the lad never had 6 months to prove he could do it. Illness got hold of him and never let go, killing him not long after.

    On the not treating certain people thing. Ok it does sound hypocritical, but on what stage could it ever be implemented. It was a throw away comment.
    You are, of course, right. This guy never got an opportunity to prove that giving him a liver would be worthwhile, and in anything even approaching an ideal world he'd have been giving a fighting chance, but the things are so rare. I don't think you could ever set up a system under which you'd give an unproven recovering alcoholic a liver. I suppose deciding on where a transplant should/shouldn't go is an area where you can never be a good guy.
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    This won't put off binge drinkers any more than Ayrton Senna being killed puts off Formula 1 drivers, Jeremy Clarkson or joyriders from fast driving.
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    (Original post by -Kav-)
    You are, of course, right. This guy never got an opportunity to prove that giving him a liver would be worthwhile, and in anything even approaching an ideal world he'd have been giving a fighting chance, but the things are so rare. I don't think you could ever set up a system under which you'd give an unproven recovering alcoholic a liver. I suppose deciding on where a transplant should/shouldn't go is an area where you can never be a good guy.
    Very well put.
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    I need a drink after reading that...
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    (Original post by DammitBauer)
    Very well put.
    Cheers. Don't lose faith in TSR just yet, by the way, as some of the best debates I've ever been involved in happened around here. Admittedly I've been here a long time, but good times tend to come and go, and we've got to be due some sooner or later.
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    "A young alcoholic denied a liver transplant because he was too ill to prove he could stay sober outside hospital has died."

    "As his health deteriorated he signed up for Alcoholics Anonymous but was admitted to hospital two months ago. Doctors at London's University College Hospital diagnosed advanced liver cirrhosis - a condition brought on by heavy drinking.

    He received a variety of the most advanced therapies but his last hope was a transplant that would have given him a 75 per cent chance of survival."

    Ok, that's just ******* disgusting. **** the NHS. Sorry, I should be more articulate than this, but words really fail me. This is just yet another reason to move towards private enterprise in healthcare, imo.

    "It was a 'difficult situation', she added, but 'with alcohol still being sold at pocket money prices, coupled with the UK's "any time anywhere any place" mentality, it is not surprising that young people are drinking to excess'." Wow, stop blaming capitalism for allowing poor people the ability to drink you stupid ***** and look at the REASONS why people drink to excess. Protip: they don't just do it for lulz.

    "Mr Reinbach, who lived in Dagenham, Essex, began drinking at the age of 13 following the break-up of his parents' relationship." Prices are evidently not to blame for Mr Reinbach's drinking problem and his death.

    (Original post by Dream Weaver)
    Well considering they did not give him a liver, instead probably giving it to someone else deemed him a "less deserving patient". Lets see; he started drinking when he was 13 and it progressed to a lot of drinking - so much so he succum to a fatal disease and couldnt get a new liver because he couldn't stop drinking for six months. Yeah, I'm sure that there is someone more deserving of life.

    And the comment about people saying "who and who shouldn't get treated", then claiming that "It's these people I wouldn't treat" is hypocritical is it not?
    If you think you have some kind of right to pass judgement on who deserve life and who doesn't, you're sorely misguided.
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    "If he's paid into the system then why can't he have a transplant??

    If you don't think he's entitled to one then put your money where your mouth is and stop paying this corrupt and criminal government as much tax as you can, they're the real problem not this sad soul who's a victim of the system and hurt nobody but himself.

    If I'm forced to pay into a system against my will then I'm entitled to receive the benefits, right??

    Personally I don't believe in paying any tax.
    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1200692/Alcoholic--aged-22--dies-refused-liver-transplant-prove-drink-again.html#ixzz0LrqBl6KH"

    Observe how the only poster with a shred of humanity gets massive negrep, lol
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    (Original post by love.to.love.you.)
    No it doesn't put me off, seriously I don't binge anything to the extent of that guy, and I doubt many people do.
    i know. i'm just saying be careful. i know cirrhosis of the liver is pretty unlikely at the vast, vast majority of even binge drinkers rate of consumption. all i am saying is be careful in geenral cos it shows alcohol is a very dangerous drug. my brother almost died at a house party after having loads of vodka. my dad picked him up from hospital after he'd been treated and observed for over 24 hours...there is a thing called the glasgow coma scale the doctors used on him...scored 1-15. i saw air ambulance on bbc1 last week and someone who'd just broken there neck was 14 on it. death sets in at 2. my brother was 3. did he forsesee almost killing himself? no of course not and no one else. my point is even if it's just one night on the town....you must be careful.

    i'm not saying stop drinking. i'm saying respect it.
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    (Original post by -Kav-)
    You are, of course, right. This guy never got an opportunity to prove that giving him a liver would be worthwhile, and in anything even approaching an ideal world he'd have been giving a fighting chance, but the things are so rare. I don't think you could ever set up a system under which you'd give an unproven recovering alcoholic a liver. I suppose deciding on where a transplant should/shouldn't go is an area where you can never be a good guy.
    Think of a liver like a child; if he abused his first one so much do you think it'd be a wise choice to give him another?
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    (Original post by Joel4fun4u)
    He was also fat. He's also ugly.

    Also, thanks to his liver giving in, he's now a Essex-tart shade of yellow!
    Where's the need for that?
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    (Original post by Gap)
    Think of a liver like a child; if he abused his first one so much do you think it'd be a wise choice to give him another?

    Oh because life is that simple. Ah to live in a black and white world, where people don't simply make mistakes or have reasons for the bad times they go through. No, they merely choose what side to live on, good or evil.
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    (Original post by Gap)
    Think of a liver like a child; if he abused his first one so much do you think it'd be a wise choice to give him another?
    As I say, in an ideal world where livers grew on trees, I think it'd be the only choice. I'd treat any self-inflicted injury. It's only because the things are so few and far between that you couldn't possibly use one on someone who is unproven in their capacity to make the best use of it. I do agree with the decision, in case their was any ambiguity.
 
 
 
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