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    I don't know what to choose between Macro I or II, or Intro to Econometrics or principles of econometrics?

    I got a 2.2 with mid 50s for my econ maths and stats modules, are the II courses much much harder?

    Also, how will it look to employers by choosing the easier ones? Does it make a big difference?
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    I meant Micro I and II, sorry!
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    oh ok, but saying I don't mind doing anything for my third year, are they much harder?
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    (Original post by Nirvash)
    I don't know what to choose between Macro I or II, or Intro to Econometrics or principles of econometrics?
    Do you mean Micro?

    I'm guessing your tutor could probably give you better, specific advice. I found EC221 (Principles of Econometrics) exercises time-consuming and challenging. But the exam is fairly standard and a walk in the park, if you have done the exercises and revised the lecture notes. I haven't looked at EC220 (Intro to Econometrics) properly but I'm not sure it's much less difficult. Probably just "what would you do..." type questions rather than actually doing them (if that makes any sense) and less mathematical.

    A similar story for the Micro modules. Micro I is less mathematical. You more or less cover the same topics, but in a different order. You look at some areas in more detail in Micro II. Again - do the exercises, follow the lecture notes, and you won't have much to worry about.

    It doesn't really matter what you got in your first year with respect to choosing either course. I don't think your tutor will ask you to take the 'I' courses. If you're willing to put the work in, you should be fine. Micro I or Micro II doesn't make a difference to the choice of 3rd year courses. But not doing EC221 counts you out of the Econometric Theory course and one other, I believe.

    Also, how will it look to employers by choosing the easier ones? Does it make a big difference?
    I wouldn't have thought it'd make a "big difference" either way. It'd probably help if you're going for masters/PhD if you're taken the more difficult ones. But the difference between the modules isn't huge, IMO.
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    (Original post by Nirvash)
    I don't know what to choose between Macro I or II, or Intro to Econometrics or principles of econometrics?

    I got a 2.2 with mid 50s for my econ maths and stats modules, are the II courses much much harder?

    Also, how will it look to employers by choosing the easier ones? Does it make a big difference?
    Just a thing for you to think about. How would the employers know which modules were the "easier" ones? Simply because of the word "Introduction" or the number II?
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    Does EC221 have any stats review lectures at the begining of the course or does it dive straight into new econometrics material?
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    Also what about Marco v Eonometrics. Plus do you think someone like me who failed EC102 can cope or should I give up now and change courses lol
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    Employers look at the fact that you're from LSE and don't really go into the module specifics. Some may require certain modules (eg if youre going into economic consultancy you will most likely need macroeconometrics) but in general no.. And don't be put off by your marks from first year guys- I barely did any work in my first year also (got a 2.2), however when I did a library marathon in my second year I managed to pull off a first in EC210 (where I got a third in EC102 in my first year ) and three 2.1's in FM212 / AC211 / ID200. Work hard play hard- then nothing's hard.
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    (Original post by 2late)
    Employers look at the fact that you're from LSE and don't really go into the module specifics. Some may require certain modules (eg if youre going into economic consultancy you will most likely need macroeconometrics) but in general no.. And don't be put off by your marks from first year guys- I barely did any work in my first year also (got a 2.2), however when I did a library marathon in my second year I managed to pull off a first in EC210 (where I got a third in EC102 in my first year ) and three 2.1's in FM212 / AC211 / ID200. Work hard play hard- then nothing's hard.
    how hard would you say you worked in your second year?

    like did you have a social life?

    did you do like loads of private study everyday?

    Did you go to all the lectures/classes? or did you just go loads of work near exam time.

    sorry for all the questions.
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    (Original post by The Enchanted Milkman)
    how hard would you say you worked in your second year?

    like did you have a social life?

    did you do like loads of private study everyday?

    Did you go to all the lectures/classes? or did you just go loads of work near exam time.

    sorry for all the questions.
    I'd say I worked about 40% of my spare time, and during easter/summer term I'd study for about 8-14 hours a day. I didn't go to all the lectures and classes, about 60-70% of them. And yes, I did have a good social life To be honest all this crap on how you can either be a nerd or have a social life but not both is a load of rubbish, if you organise your time well it shouldn't be hard, plus I spent 2 hours on the tube every day as I live in NW London. Ofcourse, some courses are more demanding and I'm just talking from the experience of doing the 4 modules listed above- FM212 / EC210 required significantly more amounts of time than the easier AC211 or ID200.
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    Hey would be nice if a previous 2nd year economics student can reccomend a good outside option. I was going to pick an economic History module but I have realised I am weak at written subjects thus so far I have semi decided on FM212. Does anyone reccomend any other maths based module which you might think is good?

    Thanks
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    Aside for PhD apps, no-one cares whether you did I or II. Micro I does things in less depth but covers more ground and we were told it was perfectly adequate for those aiming to do a Masters (which I'd hope, because it's a pretty tough module) - it's really down to personal preference.
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    (Original post by Johan C)
    Aside for PhD apps, no-one cares whether you did I or II. Micro I does things in less depth but covers more ground and we were told it was perfectly adequate for those aiming to do a Masters (which I'd hope, because it's a pretty tough module) - it's really down to personal preference.
    They don't really care full stop. By the way, never saw you to say well done on the first
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    (Original post by Who?)
    They don't really care full stop. By the way, never saw you to say well done on the first
    Agreed. Thanks, but who's this ?
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    (Original post by Johan C)
    Agreed. Thanks, but who's this ?
    Oh you know me - but if I told you here I would have to kill you :p:
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    (Original post by Nirvash)
    I don't know what to choose between Macro I or II, or Intro to Econometrics or principles of econometrics?

    I got a 2.2 with mid 50s for my econ maths and stats modules, are the II courses much much harder?

    Also, how will it look to employers by choosing the easier ones? Does it make a big difference?
    I would choose the I course. One of my friends who has gained several firsts over their first 2 years here only got 40% in the II course. Pride comes before a fall comes to mind.
 
 
 
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