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    (Original post by TheButtylicious)
    I have... although the Pankhursts were Suffragettes if I remember correctly from GCSE History

    Which stats? :P
    Check these out...High Fliers Research:

    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle3845810.ece

    PS. go to the bottom of the article

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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Check these out...High Fliers Research:

    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle3845810.ece

    PS. go to the bottom of the article

    squish.
    Wow - they don't actually surprise me tbh... It's about right. I think it's possibly due to family commitments. I.e. teaching pays 'well' and same holidays/work hours as kids... Women are still much more likely to take care of children - you can't disagree with that.
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    (Original post by TheButtylicious)
    Right... :unsure:

    Tbh, I don't think I'd go without sex purely just fingering or using a vibrator.. no where near as fun. You could meet someone at work/uni though surely?

    Women enjoy watching the embarrassment though - it's true, sadly
    Yes, but surely there have been periods during your post-pubescent life where you haven't been able to access daily sex.

    I have never had a partner (firlgriend/foybriend) but I wouldn't say that not having one has affected me adversely.

    As for university, the majority of my friends are male and I don't really socialize at university - on 3 days of the week I have to dash off across the city to work - and on one of the other 2 nights I have society-related meetings and I need to reserve one (or 2 nights preferably) for additional reading etc. Also entering into a relationship with someone on the society might be deemed unprofessional.

    As for work, because of university commitments and because I work out-of-hours I don't usually manage to go to company 'nights out'. Again it could be deemed awkward and unprofessional to enter into sexual relations with somebody on your team/in your dept. etc. and liaising with senior management that way could mean that you are accused of exploiting the 'casting couch' to move up in the organization. Again these aren't risks I'm prepared to take.

    Regards your point about women enjoying watching the embarrassment - as I said, I'd rather not humiliate myself in that way since it would just hurt my confidence/self-esteem....and why would anyone want that?

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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Yes, but surely there have been periods during your post-pubescent life where you haven't been able to access daily sex.

    I have never had a partner (firlgriend/foybriend) but I wouldn't say that not having one has affected me adversely.

    As for university, the majority of my friends are male and I don't really socialize at university - on 3 days of the week I have to dash off across the city to work - and on one of the other 2 nights I have society-related meetings and I need to reserve one (or 2 nights preferably) for additional reading etc. Also entering into a relationship with someone on the society might be deemed unprofessional.

    As for work, because of university commitments and because I work out-of-hours I don't usually manage to go to company 'nights out'. Again it could be deemed awkward and unprofessional to enter into sexual relations with somebody on your team/in your dept. etc. and liaising with senior management that way could mean that you are accused of exploiting the 'casting couch' to move up in the organization. Again these aren't risks I'm prepared to take.

    Regards your point about women enjoying watching the embarrassment - as I said, I'd rather not humiliate myself in that way since it would just hurt my confidence/self-esteem....and why would anyone want that?

    squish.
    Woo, I don't have daily sex. I'm single and not a whore!

    Do you not feel the need to socialise? Okay, maybe you're very work orientated, but I am too but still maintain that balance.

    I'm not saying I want to see you humiliated, but I know a lot of women who see men approaching them and just blow them off for the sake of it. Which is why the majority of my friends are male
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    (Original post by TheButtylicious)
    Wow - they don't actually surprise me tbh... It's about right. I think it's possibly due to family commitments. I.e. teaching pays 'well' and same holidays/work hours as kids... Women are still much more likely to take care of children - you can't disagree with that.
    In Western societies aren't men involved with childcare as much - and in general development during the adolescent years? Many people say that a mother's role is critical during the first 5 years (0-5) but a father's role becomes much more important when the child enters his/her adolescent years (especially if the child is male).

    Maybe women (girls) should be made very aware of the effect that pregnancy (and a subsequent career break) could have on career progression etc. at a young age (15/16 etc) so that they are encouraged to embark on their careers earlier so as not to sacrifice too much ground to men advancing through the ranks in the workplace.

    Also, the relative involvements of both the man and the woman (assuming it's a heterosexual couple) in the child's upbringing would vary per couple and hopefully have been discussed (with respect to the individuals career choices and balances) prior to the child being conceived.

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    (Original post by TheButtylicious)
    Woo, I don't have daily sex. I'm single and not a whore!

    Do you not feel the need to socialise? Okay, maybe you're very work orientated, but I am too but still maintain that balance.

    I'm not saying I want to see you humiliated, but I know a lot of women who see men approaching them and just blow them off for the sake of it. Which is why the majority of my friends are male
    Sorry! Wasn't insinuating that you were promiscuous (though in Europe it is perfectly legal to be that way regardless of your gender, no?)

    I wasn't obviously as work orientated when I was younger but if you want to go places you have to really excel: in your academics, in the workplace, in societies, in sports, in your extra-curriculars etc. and hopefully even gain industry recognition.

    I agree in that I didn't get the work/social-balance right this academic year because I could not plan a single night during the week when I would be free. I'm busy in the workplace on Friday (6pm-1am) and am usually too exhausted on Saturday nights - also I have to be in for work early on Sunday (8am-5pm).

    Remember that I've just turned 20 so am getting on a bit too!

    Do you ever approach men with the intention of making them your foybriend? I would say I prefer socializing with men (without wanting to sound sexist) because generally (not always though) we have more common interests but also because I once did socialize with a woman who I developed feelings for and obviously this isn't appropriate if the woman is your friend.

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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    In Western societies aren't men involved with childcare as much - and in general development during the adolescent years? Many people say that a mother's role is critical during the first 5 years (0-5) but a father's role becomes much more important when the child enters his/her adolescent years (especially if the child is male).

    Maybe women (girls) should be made very aware of the effect that pregnancy (and a subsequent career break) could have on career progression etc. at a young age (15/16 etc) so that they are encouraged to embark on their careers earlier so as not to sacrifice too much ground to men advancing through the ranks in the workplace.

    Also, the relative involvements of both the man and the woman (assuming it's a heterosexual couple) in the child's upbringing would vary per couple and hopefully have been discussed (with respect to the individuals career choices and balances) prior to the child being conceived.

    squish.
    Do you have a non British racial background?

    Note - people can be wrong. I didn't see either of my parents much when I was young (or now) and I've turned out perfectly fine (matter of opinion :P )

    I don't think girls need to have this forced into them at 16. The ones who want the career, will go for the career. I.e. the ones who are worth it, won't get pregnant at such a young age. I still don't think teenage pregnancy is the issue.

    It would but how often is this the case? Unexpected pregnancies? Teenage pregnancies? How often are children conceived in a full marital relationship anymore? What like 50% ?
    This is where I admire the Eastern route... they still have this tradition and grounding to culture. But how long will it last?
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    (Original post by TheButtylicious)
    Do you have a non British racial background?

    Note - people can be wrong. I didn't see either of my parents much when I was young (or now) and I've turned out perfectly fine (matter of opinion :P )

    I don't think girls need to have this forced into them at 16. The ones who want the career, will go for the career. I.e. the ones who are worth it, won't get pregnant at such a young age. I still don't think teenage pregnancy is the issue.

    It would but how often is this the case? Unexpected pregnancies? Teenage pregnancies? How often are children conceived in a full marital relationship anymore? What like 50% ?
    This is where I admire the Eastern route... they still have this tradition and grounding to culture. But how long will it last?
    My ethnicity is predominantly Persian (Aryan) with bits of Turkmeni, a smattering of Dravidian (South Indian) and a slice of Portuguese in there too. I immigrated to Britain when I was quite young though. Are you Anglo-Saxon?

    Obviously single parenthood doesn't always result in disaster - the parent could be very committed and still provide a stable home life.

    When I said being informed about the effect pregnancy can have on a career - I wasn't referring to teenage pregnancy at all - just generally pregnancy at any time in a woman's career - even if a woman was absolutely committed to her career I'd reckon it would still be 3 months of 'lost ground' if you want to view it that way.

    I would have thought (with sex education especially - which has been compulsory for the last 5 years or so?) that teenage pregnancies would be pretty low - there are numerous ways to prevent pregnancy!

    e.g.

    1. male contraception (condom)
    2. female contraception (femidom)
    3. oral contraceptive pill
    4. 'morning-after' pill
    5. male vasectomy
    6. only engaging in oral/anal (i.e. non-vaginal) intercourse.

    I'm sure many children aren't conceived in a marital relationship but they could still be conceived directly before it - and also many couples are in effect 'married' but officially 'cohabit'. Wouldn't it be pretty irresponsible to not plan the conception of a child - I'm sure most people would think about the financial/social/educational implications of it - otherwise they would panic.

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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    My ethnicity is predominantly Persian (Aryan) with bits of Turkmeni, a smattering of Dravidian (South Indian) and a slice of Portuguese in there too. I immigrated to Britain when I was quite young though. Are you Anglo-Saxon?

    Obviously single parenthood doesn't always result in disaster - the parent could be very committed and still provide a stable home life.

    When I said being informed about the effect pregnancy can have on a career - I wasn't referring to teenage pregnancy at all - just generally pregnancy at any time in a woman's career - even if a woman was absolutely committed to her career I'd reckon it would still be 3 months of 'lost ground' if you want to view it that way.

    I would have thought (with sex education especially - which has been compulsory for the last 5 years or so?) that teenage pregnancies would be pretty low - there are numerous ways to prevent pregnancy!

    e.g.

    1. male contraception (condom)
    2. female contraception (femidom)
    3. oral contraceptive pill
    4. 'morning-after' pill
    5. male vasectomy
    6. only engaging in oral/anal (i.e. non-vaginal) intercourse.

    I'm sure many children aren't conceived in a marital relationship but they could still be conceived directly before it - and also many couples are in effect 'married' but officially 'cohabit'. Wouldn't it be pretty irresponsible to not plan the conception of a child - I'm sure most people would think about the financial/social/educational implications of it - otherwise they would panic.

    squish.
    Erm... wow. No, my dad's Indian and my mum's African.

    I understand what you mean but some mothers (like mine) return to work very quickly after giving birth (took her 3 days).

    I know a number of my friends take the responsibility for contraception and the male protection goes unknown. I really find it shocking to be honest that the level of teenage pregnancy is so high.

    But I mean that happens. A lot of the time. I mean if a woman becomes pregnant 'accidentally' it doesn't mean that they won't think of the implications but it just means they have to. I'm talking about the level of people don't think about having a child, aren't exactly prepared to bring up a child and end up pregnant.
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    (Original post by TheButtylicious)
    Erm... wow. No, my dad's Indian and my mum's African.

    I understand what you mean but some mothers (like mine) return to work very quickly after giving birth (took her 3 days).

    I know a number of my friends take the responsibility for contraception and the male protection goes unknown. I really find it shocking to be honest that the level of teenage pregnancy is so high.

    But I mean that happens. A lot of the time. I mean if a woman becomes pregnant 'accidentally' it doesn't mean that they won't think of the implications but it just means they have to. I'm talking about the level of people don't think about having a child, aren't exactly prepared to bring up a child and end up pregnant.
    I'd still have thought that most couples 'plan' their children though. It's estimated that it costs parents on average £186,000 to bring up one child from the age of 0 to 18. I'm financially self-sufficient now (with a few outstanding loans that still require full repayment in future) but would not embark on having children at all since that would need to be planned for.

    Isn't this kind of stuff discussed at school?

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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    I'd still have thought that most couples 'plan' their children though. It's estimated that it costs parents on average £186,000 to bring up one child from the age of 0 to 18. I'm financially self-sufficient now (with a few outstanding loans that still require full repayment in future) but would not embark on having children at all since that would need to be planned for.

    Isn't this kind of stuff discussed at school?

    squish.
    I can't remember discussing this at school. Sex was a bit of a taboo at school... I never talked about sex.

    I just think many people don't have kids in a strong relationship. I'm gonna check out some figures...
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    us men are the real bread winners.....**** feminism and their double standards! in women ruled the world we'd be ******.FACT
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    (Original post by TheButtylicious)
    I can't remember discussing this at school. Sex was a bit of a taboo at school... I never talked about sex.

    I just think many people don't have kids in a strong relationship. I'm gonna check out some figures...
    Why was it taboo in school? Didn't you have sexual education lessons?

    We had them but we always had a French lesson afterwards in which we were tested on vocabulary/verbs/comprehensions so I never really listened in the sexual education lesson beforehand - about the only thing I remembered was how to put a condom on and I've not had to personally use that skill either.

    Do many girls talk about sex or know how it works?

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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Why was it taboo in school? Didn't you have sexual education lessons?

    We had them but we always had a French lesson afterwards in which we were tested on vocabulary/verbs/comprehensions so I never really listened in the sexual education lesson beforehand - about the only thing I remembered was how to put a condom on and I've not had to personally use that skill either.

    Do many girls talk about sex or know how it works?

    squish.
    Yeah I did but people generally avoided the topic. I certainly did - It's only until recently I've become more open about it.

    Hmm fair enough. I think they're kinda a waste tbh. Everything I learnt in sex ed I already knew/experienced.

    Are you asking me if girls know what sex is? I don't talk about my sex personally but some of my girl friends do... They all know how it works though :confused:
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    (Original post by xps.systems)

    When I said being informed about the effect pregnancy can have on a career - I wasn't referring to teenage pregnancy at all - just generally pregnancy at any time in a woman's career - even if a woman was absolutely committed to her career I'd reckon it would still be 3 months of 'lost ground' if you want to view it that way.
    Women in general know that their career will suffer if they take time off to have children. It's not just the time out through the end of pregnancy and recovery (plus maternity leave if they take all of it), it's the reduced freedom. Women in high flying careers often need to travel, stay overnight, work late...having to leave major negotiations because their child has had an accident or not being in the office because their child has a cold will have a negative impact (and let's face it, it is predominantly the mother who deals with these things). In addition it's not only the perceptions of the bosses, but the relationship with other staff which is affected - especially the ones who are male or are single/childless because we have to cover for them (a significant number - although not all - take the mick!).


    I would have thought (with sex education especially - which has been compulsory for the last 5 years or so?) that teenage pregnancies would be pretty low - there are numerous ways to prevent pregnancy!

    e.g.

    1. male contraception (condom)
    2. female contraception (femidom)
    3. oral contraceptive pill
    4. 'morning-after' pill
    5. male vasectomy
    6. only engaging in oral/anal (i.e. non-vaginal) intercourse.
    The UK has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in Europe - and it's not through lack of awareness! I would suggest that a large part of the problem is too much information too young and over sexualisation of young people


    I'm sure many children aren't conceived in a marital relationship but they could still be conceived directly before it - and also many couples are in effect 'married' but officially 'cohabit'. Wouldn't it be pretty irresponsible to not plan the conception of a child - I'm sure most people would think about the financial/social/educational implications of it - otherwise they would panic.

    squish.
    You're giving certain elements of society far too much credit - they're not all as mature in their outlook! There are certain sections of society who use pregnancy to get a flat, benefits etc because they know the backing is there. This didn't happen as often when there was still a stigma attached to being pregnant and unwed (I'm not suggesting the country returns to that in it's extreme though).


    Sorry for barging in on your discussion!
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    I can understand why there aren't many midhusbands - the function they perform affects only WOMEN during childbirth.
    Interesting note, a male midwife is still called a midwife. The 'wife' part refers to the person giving birth. But there are only about 4 or so male midwives in the entire country.

    I think some people are too quick to downplay the differences between male and female brains. We know that there are differences between male and female brains, on average. So it stands to reason that men and women will, on average, have different traits, abilities, desires, etc. It's hard to know when these things are more affected by social or biological influences. I suspect in many cases both are a factor.

    Take for example technical subjects like computer science. Could it be that more men do it because men tend to have the right traits to be good at it/interested in it? Or is it just because it's seen as a thing that's for men and not for women? I think it's probably both. For some biological reason, men are more likely than women to be interested in it. But because of that, it's seen as a man's thing, so women are further put off from it.
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    Men who want to be treated exactly the same as women do annoy me. It's like the other day, this guy was going on about the AA and RAC lone women policy (women on their own are a priority call apparently) and he thinks this is unfair. If he wants men to look after him he should have a sex change in my opinion. They annoy me just as much as women/ men who say they know 'x' girl who's stronger, better at driving than men so that means women and men are equal in all ways. You are talking complete bolloxs.

    And I will always treat women differently to men, that means some women will appreciate it, some won't .I don't care really. And I think women in general like men to look after to them , although some keep quiet about it, thanks to the feminazis. Doesn't mean I don't think women shouldn't have the same opportunities like men at work but I think it isn't wrong to be realistic and not deny men and women are different.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    The pendulum still definitely swings in favour of men. It is still true that only a small minority of women reach the most senior positions.

    I read an interesting report recently by a think-tank. It basically looked at newspaper reports and editorials of politicians. The newspapers were a LOT more critical of the women than the men, and something like 50% of the reports implied that gender had something to do with it; often criticising women of being too emotional. And, of course, if a women deliberately tries to avoid that by appearing as rational as possible, as Hillary Clinton attempted to do, then they get criticised for it and called a "Ice Queen".

    You can also see it on TSR. If a women says something negative about men, she gets brutally flamed. If a guy says something bad about women, he doesn't get flamed nearly so much. People still feel the need to stereotype people rather than taking them for who they are.
    I agree ,however I noticed you never mentioned Sarah Palin in your post who's treatment by the media, bloggers and people in general I believe has set back women in Politics at least in the states 20 yrs. I believe the left in America and to a lesser extent the UK is fundementally sexist in it's treatment of women of the right in comparison to right wing male politicians. They have done huge damage I believe to women being able to take up high profile political positions .And sadly some of the downright unacceptable nasty things that have been said by the left were said by women.

    And that is something we do not like to talk about. Leave aside the sterotypical middleaged sexist male. Women can be their own worst enemies. Jealously is a lot to do with it.

    Some of the things said about Palin that reached the media included a popular female comedian suggested Palin needed to be raped by a gang of Black men. Constant references to her appearance by both men and women , being critical of her clothes and hair , and making sexual remarks 'slutty flight attendant' , 'brainless bimbo'. A comedian discussing her teenage daughters and suggesting a sportman had sex with one of them during the interval. Suggesting because she has children she cannot be president.

    I believe sadly in America , Black males are seen as more worthy than women of all colours for political office. I do believe we see more minor versions of this discrimnation in the UK. Although some of our female politicians do deserve some criticism.But it should be about their policies not about their appearance and family arrangements.
 
 
 
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