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Disappointed with uni results watch

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    There's a huge jump between A levels and Uni. At least now you'll remember to have a jet pack rather than a pogostick.

    ...And I'm all out of useless metaphors for today.
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    yeah i jst did a resit in summer too ><
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    (Original post by Waterrrmelon)
    wow how did u do that?
    I guess it just took me a year to make the transition from school style learning to university style.
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    First year I scraped a 2:2, just. Too much drinking, not enough working.

    I've just got my second year results through and they were the best in the year (high 1st). Won me a prize.
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    (Original post by Veil of Maya)
    First year I scraped a 2:2, just. Too much drinking, not enough working.

    I've just got my second year results through and they were the best in the year (high 1st). Won me a prize.
    well done!! so...2nd year how much did you go out n how much did you work?
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    (Original post by Veil of Maya)
    First year I scraped a 2:2, just. Too much drinking, not enough working.

    I've just got my second year results through and they were the best in the year (high 1st). Won me a prize.
    But how much working was it in the second year, like did you decide at least x hours a day and more on weekends? Mine was very when I liked and I got a 2.1 but ive been off for a year and am scared my final year will be a 3rd unless i go all out.
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    (Original post by Waterrrmelon)
    well done!! so...2nd year how much did you go out n how much did you work?
    Lol looks like were thinking alike
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    My university wanted to put me on a pass degree after I failed 2 out of my 3 first year resits. Took the full credits anyway and got a high 2.2 which is still below what im capable of, hopefully a 2.1 overall will be achievable. BTW; second year you dont learn to do any more work or less drinking, you just learn how to use your time when you are working to target the marks and avoid doing the pointless **** they give you.
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    University is a fundamentally different type of learning to school- much more responsibility is on the student, much less guidance is provided, you have to go looking. Sometimes, first year markers go deliberately harshly on their students, knowing that it doesn't count, in order to (try) and get them to buck their ideas up. Cambridge has been known for using a similar tactic in the past.

    Straight A students won't always be straight A students, thats not how it works. If it did, no one who went to an ex-poly would ever make it in life, a BCC student would permanently be beneath an ABB one and so on. People mature (and stop improving) at different ages- when I was at school, the head boy (with consistently top grades) and another friend of mine with similar scores, struggled to gain a 2:1 and dropped out of university respectively. My grades, while good, weren't at their level at school, yet at university the roles were well and truly reversed- perhaps I only gained the right attitude at 20 years old? Perhaps they were used to sailing through exams and couldn't handle it when the pace increased or everyone was as good as they were? It's hard to say.

    Point is, one year at the beginning of university won't make or break you- I can't promise you'll go back to getting first class marks again, but I will say that its not all doom and gloom from here on in. Redouble your efforts, and more importantly, take advice from your tutors- of all people, they're the best placed to advise you of what they're looking for in order to gain top marks.
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    University is a fundamentally different type of learning to school- much more responsibility is on the student, much less guidance is provided, you have to go looking. Sometimes, first year markers go deliberately harshly on their students, knowing that it doesn't count, in order to (try) and get them to buck their ideas up. Cambridge has been known for using a similar tactic in the past.

    Straight A students won't always be straight A students, thats not how it works. If it did, no one who went to an ex-poly would ever make it in life, a BCC student would permanently be beneath an ABB one and so on. People mature (and stop improving) at different ages- when I was at school, the head boy (with consistently top grades) and another friend of mine with similar scores, struggled to gain a 2:1 and dropped out of university respectively. My grades, while good, weren't at their level at school, yet at university the roles were well and truly reversed- perhaps I only gained the right attitude at 20 years old? Perhaps they were used to sailing through exams and couldn't handle it when the pace increased or everyone was as good as they were? It's hard to say.

    Point is, one year at the beginning of university won't make or break you- I can't promise you'll go back to getting first class marks again, but I will say that its not all doom and gloom from here on in. Redouble your efforts, and more importantly, take advice from your tutors- of all people, they're the best placed to advise you of what they're looking for in order to gain top marks.
    Hmmm, youre far too level headed to be on TSR.
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    (Original post by Jennie1987)
    Hmmm, youre far too level headed to be on TSR.
    Alas, I've noticed this. :sad:
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    hehehe thanks for advice everybody
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    Alas, I've noticed this. :sad:
    As mentioned, I have been away from academia for a year and would really like some sort of guide - 'I did at least 3 hours a day of subjects and assignments/i did two hours a day of subjects and each weekend 10 hours of assignments etc.'. Im waging war on the third year but starting with some pre-term study and having done things when I pleased I now have no idea of my level of previous work so I can increase for at least a shot at better results. But I feel its an 'alas' again and a 'just do as much as you can and see what result you get in first assignments then gauge' :mad: I hate not knowing things....I need a time machine

    Btw is that someone from Danger Mouse? I feel like Google would be cheating.
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    You don't happen to be doing biomedical sciences at UCL, do you?

    My sister is doing that and just got her results, so I thought I'd hazard a guess lol.
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    (Original post by Jennie1987)
    As mentioned, I have been away from academia for a year and would really like some sort of guide - 'I did at least 3 hours a day of subjects and assignments/i did two hours a day of subjects and each weekend 10 hours of assignments etc.'. Im waging war on the third year but starting with some pre-term study and having done things when I pleased I now have no idea of my level of previous work so I can increase for at least a shot at better results. But I feel its an 'alas' again and a 'just do as much as you can and see what result you get in first assignments then gauge' :mad: I hate not knowing things....I need a time machine

    Btw is that someone from Danger Mouse? I feel like Google would be cheating.
    Indeed it is, its Penfold. He reminds me of an academic I know, with an equally silly accent. :ninja:

    Personally, I don't think the "X hours a day" philosophy works. I prefer to look at it along the lines of doing what needs to be done, and then some, if I have time to kill. I go to a lecture, take my notes, lookup the reading list provided, and read around the framework thats been provided. You usually find that the books either side of what you should be reading on the library shelf are on the same sort of stuff, and it always helps (not to mention looks good when you cite work that wasn't on the prescribed reading) to have a second and third opinion.

    To give an example (and this will be long winded):
    Spoiler:
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    When it came to my fourth year special subject exam, paper one was 20 extracts from the handouts (four articles per week, each covering around a half-decade period, 96 in all) from which we had to "comment on" six (the wider scenario behind the three line snippet, why that was significant etc) in two hours. Paper two was a conventional two essays in two hours number. Since we had no idea what was coming up, it was a case of learning as much as you can about the course, and doing it smartly. I worked out I'd have to cover about a week's worth of articles every two days, so I didn't leave the library until that was achieved. If one article took me six hours in order to fully read all the background material, then so be it- I'd never have forgiven myself from slacking off and getting a 2:1- its not as if I had anything better to be doing anyway.

    I also don't believe in doing a little each day either. You will forget what you've been taught, even if you revise it that night, by the end of the year. Do what you need to do in order to do well in the next assignment, and be prepared to look at it again six months later like you've never seen it in your life before. There isn't really any substitute for knowing the subject inside out. I know people who prepared presentations with flash cards in a minute font which basically had their essay condensed onto it- I went down the route of just reading up everything so that I knew what I was talking about, then went in and used half a dozen words to prompt me onto the next point, and it flowed much more freely as a result.

    There isn't really any hard and fast formula. Some people want to get a 2:1 with the minimum of effort by revising just what they need to, but I don't see the point in that. No one will be impressed with you saying "I got a 2:1 but I was clever enough for a first" in a decade, and its not like theres better things to be doing, where I went we had student nights out every night of the week, it wasn't a big deal to miss one here and there. Oxbridge may still call it 'reading' a subject- but thats what it still is for the most part, and what you don't know will soon be exposed if you haven't put the hours in. You should have plenty of past papers floating around- use them if you can. You'll know yourself when extra reading is only covering the same ground again, and you'll know when you take one look at a question and can rhyme off a heap of material on it. The really hard bit is knowing which bits to trim off and how to stick to the point at all times, but I'm afraid some people seem to be able to do that and some can't, and (judging by the drop in tutoring sessions we ran for freshers) some will seemingly never be able to get that bit right. If you do the dry and boring bit though, its blatantly obvious to anyone marking it that you know your stuff, which is always a good thing.


    You'll be surprised how much you mature aswell. A year off sometimes gives people time to take stock, meaning when they come back they find they somehow stop making the same mistakes they'd been making in the past. An old tutor of mine was a great believer in final exams at the end of university with nothing that counted beforehand, said it allowed students to show how their knowlegde over the years had culminated, and made for better work (as opposed to forgetting things forever knowing you won't need them). I must say, he might have had a point...
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    I must say, he might have had a point...
    So I guess we're agreed on the whole needing a time machine bit as only Future Me can tell Present Me what worked and where Future Me feels Present Me will go wrong.

    I think Ill just stick to my base ideas
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    Taken from an old post of mine
    3. Keep a binder with printouts of lecture/tutorial questions/slides/case studies/notes (could be handwritten) with each subject having its own binder and divided by semesters/terms. Then each week has a plastic wallet with the relevant paperwork. Whats easiest is putting a sticky label on the front of the wallet saying what the topic was that week e.g. Direct Marketing/Referencing/Databases. Then itll be easier to study/find the extract for your essay.
    4. MOST PPL WILL THINK THIS IS CRAZY. At the end of the week/term/semester, if you can then group similar weeks' topics, make up brainstorms or cue cards of what you went over. This way youre subtley revising and have prepared your future revision resources. Then you can take a couple weeks off your revision time at the end of the year (in relation to suggested revision timetable).
    and reading (which means more time taking books out which is bad as I forget to take them back)
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    personally I worry more about the people who do very well in first year. In my experience they were the ones who didn't use first year to adjust to uni lifestyle. Lets be honest, there's a good reason why first year doesn't count and you've probably picked up a lot of good study habbits as well as getting used to living away from home. As long as you work a bit and take the time to look back honestly at what you did right and what you did wrong you should be okay.

    There's a lot to be said for people maturing and getting better at studying the longer they do it. Personally I started my undergrad having probably some of the lowest A-level grades on the course, didn't exactly set the world on fire in 1st year and then my marks rose steadily every semester of each year and by the end of third year was doing really well.
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    (Original post by Jennie1987)
    So I guess we're agreed on the whole needing a time machine bit as only Future Me can tell Present Me what worked and where Future Me feels Present Me will go wrong.

    I think Ill just stick to my base ideas
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Taken from an old post of mine
    3. Keep a binder with printouts of lecture/tutorial questions/slides/case studies/notes (could be handwritten) with each subject having its own binder and divided by semesters/terms. Then each week has a plastic wallet with the relevant paperwork. Whats easiest is putting a sticky label on the front of the wallet saying what the topic was that week e.g. Direct Marketing/Referencing/Databases. Then itll be easier to study/find the extract for your essay.
    4. MOST PPL WILL THINK THIS IS CRAZY. At the end of the week/term/semester, if you can then group similar weeks' topics, make up brainstorms or cue cards of what you went over. This way youre subtley revising and have prepared your future revision resources. Then you can take a couple weeks off your revision time at the end of the year (in relation to suggested revision timetable).
    and reading (which means more time taking books out which is bad as I forget to take them back)
    Yup, what worked for me might not for you, and vice versa. Hard work alone isn't enough to get a first unfortunately, you sometimes need a bit of luck and to have a good day in the exams- a harsh marker and a mind blank at the wrong time can undo even the best students ambitions.
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    personally I worry more about the people who do very well in first year.
    hahaha i guess that leaves little room for improvement and you'll be more upset if you don't reach that the next year...
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    (Original post by Jennie1987)
    But how much working was it in the second year, like did you decide at least x hours a day and more on weekends? Mine was very when I liked and I got a 2.1 but ive been off for a year and am scared my final year will be a 3rd unless i go all out.
    I started to really enjoy my course so it wasn't like I really had to schedule time when I really HAD to work. Generally from 9-5 and then some more when doing essays/coursework or whatever. I've still had a social life, I just didn't procrastinate and therefore managed to use my time productively.
 
 
 
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