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"You should only go to Uni if you have an A at A-level" Watch

  • View Poll Results: The government should only subsidise courses for people who have achieved an 'A'
    Agree wholeheartedly
    31
    11.57%
    Agree somewhat, but think this measure is too extreme.
    108
    40.30%
    Disagree
    129
    48.13%

    • Thread Starter
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    Do you agree or disagree with the statement:

    "The government should only subsidise university courses for people who have achieved at least one 'A' at A-level."

    I neither agree nor disagree with the statement. I would be interested to hear what others thought. The statement is not necessarily a reflection of my point of view, but rather serves to trigger discussion.

    This is a potentially difficult subject. Please don't take offence. I just want some ideas to be thrown around and opinions to be aired.
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    Disagree; simply because grades mean nothing.
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    stupid, there are people who want to go to uni for the experience and may not have an A, but for most who want to go to uni to pursue serious study then they should be getting an A anyway

    you would be depriving people of more opportunities
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Disagree; simply because grades mean nothing.
    then why do you list your uni grade in your sig? :confused:
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Disagree; simply because grades mean nothing.
    Of course they do...
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    I think that people who are only acheiving low grades at Alevels probably should really make sure that uni is the right thing for them...

    The work is unlikely to get any easier. It might be worth taking a different path which is less academic...?

    It depends on the degree, however. Then again, there are so many 'Mickey Mouse' alevels these days that for people doing peculiar degrees surely an A in one of the 'lesser' alevels would be achievable?

    Haha, I sound like such a snob.. sorry...
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    (Original post by ronaldo91)
    stupid, there are people who want to go to uni for the experience
    If they are going for the experience then why should the tax payer subsidise it, courses cost a lot more than the tuition fees and the taxpayer foots the bill.
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    (Original post by SSshrinky)
    It depends on the degree, however. Then again, there are so many 'Mickey Mouse' alevels these days that for people doing peculiar degrees surely an A in one of the 'lesser' alevels would be achievable?
    I am excluding critical thinking and general studies but everything else is fair game.
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    Definitely not, there are plenty of people who don't have A-grades doing courses at university that are going to be exceptionally beneficial to society, probably moreso than people who are doing traditional, academic degrees - I'm mainly thinking of healthcare and social work type courses.

    Edit: I got negged for pointing out that nurses and social workers might be worth subsidising throughout university?
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Disagree; simply because grades mean nothing.
    Right.
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    Disagree, methodologically flawed for so many reasons; too broad-brush.
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    (Original post by ronaldo91)
    stupid, there are people who want to go to uni for the experience and may not have an A, but for most who want to go to uni to pursue serious study then they should be getting an A anyway

    you would be depriving people of more opportunities

    Serious study is the primary role of university. You shouldnt be going to uni if you dont intend to work hard. It was never supposed to be for everyone.
    • Community Assistant
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    Would just doing one A-Level and getting an A be enough? Would AEE be enough? Since that’s still at least one A.

    The important debate I think we have to have is what the purpose of further and higher education should be. Are A-Levels about examining pupils? Is university just about the experience? Should further education better prepare those less academic for the world of work? Should those unable to attend university in the long run even be allowed the chance to do A-Levels and get UUU or EUU or something similar? Is university solely about fostering knowledge and research in an academic discipline?

    The government is pushing for everyone to get AAA and everyone to go into university, irrespective of their capabilities or wants. We’re changing the face of education, and don’t even seem to realise it.
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    I think university shouldn't be about drawing a line halfway down school leavers, and seeing where it lands. That way, the top 50% get in relative to their peers, and we lose all sign of standards. Its hard to put a grade boundary on what's being suggested either: BBB is a perfectly respectable score, and will get you in to all but 20-25 or so universities, and much of that is set by how popular a course is anyway. In addition, A*A*AA might well become the norm in a decade's time- the same course that Prince William did has upped from BBC to AAB in the same period.

    In short, no, I don't think an A is necessary. I'd desire it in your chosen field, and I'd be reluctant to take those who failed courses repeatedly on, but as we've seen- certain schools can churn out AAA students almost at will, does this denote intelligence or potential for future academic ability? I'd argue it doesn't necessarily. I'd like students who have proved an ability to work hard and overcome obstacles on my course, but I don't think they necessarily have to have As (in the current climate, assuming no future grade inflation) in order to meet that. However, while this idea of opening to degrees for all is all well and good, is having DD entry requirements for a degree, in theory of equal standing to any other, helping employers, or anyone else? Aren't we just creating a two-tier system anyway? I'd improve college diploma provision, as I think thats a better way to bettering education for the masses, than some of these degrees which let in those from school with grades that are below average by anyone's standards.
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    People mature at different levels. Just because you can't manage your work load correctly at age 16/17 doesn't mean you won't get a first for all of your work at age 18-21.

    It also depends on personal circumstances, its much easier to get an A at a level if mummy and daddy bought you a car and encouraged you to work rather than sitting your final A level exams as your parents go through a divorce and your girlfriend cheats on you.

    Grades are mainly a measure of time and effort put in and management of this, rather than just not being intelligent enough to get the grades.

    It also means that universitys will have people who know they haven't done as well as they could at a level which could aid with their determination to achieve at a high level at uni.
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    quite stupid, It partially depends on the subject. coz if you pick a totally irrelevent subject to subjects done at A level, then whats the need for an A???

    Also, sometimes a person can't get and A do to financial problems so removing financial support to the unis might put extra burden on the students, so they may not go in to further education at all, so the real loser is the future of the British economy.!
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    (Original post by DeeDub)
    If they are going for the experience then why should the tax payer subsidise it, courses cost a lot more than the tuition fees and the taxpayer foots the bill.
    hopefully after they graduate and get a job, they will pay taxes which then fund the next generation

    i think it's also generally accepted that we should try and make education e.g uni more accessible to everyone
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    I vehemently disagree. This would be merely another form of social engineering, you can pratically pay for A grades now, is this fair? You're also assuming that everybody who achieves an A grade is worthy of going to university and everybody that doesn't isn't and thus won't be beneficial to society. What should we do? Shove them into worth, stunt their educational and personal growth?
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    (Original post by ChrisLincoln)
    It also depends on personal circumstances, its much easier to get an A at a level if mummy and daddy bought you a car and encouraged you to work rather than sitting your final A level exams as your parents go through a divorce and your girlfriend cheats on you.
    I'm sorry, but those are the worst examples ever. Parents in more affluent families can also, believe it or not, get divorced, and the cheating girlfriend can happen to anyone. Plus, I'd hardly say the latter is a reason at all for doing badly - it happens, that's life, get over it.
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    What's this rubbish.

    BBB is perfectly respectable, and there is no reason someone getting those grades shouldn't go to uni to further their education. Plenty of good universities make offers which don't require any As for academic subjects.

    Now, I'm not disagreeing on principle. If you were talking about people not even getting Cs, then I might perhaps agree, but this thresh-hold is ridiculous.
 
 
 
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