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"You should only go to Uni if you have an A at A-level" Watch

  • View Poll Results: The government should only subsidise courses for people who have achieved an 'A'
    Agree wholeheartedly
    31
    11.57%
    Agree somewhat, but think this measure is too extreme.
    108
    40.30%
    Disagree
    129
    48.13%

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    A-levels are a joke so trying to set them as a benchmark for potential is pointless.
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    "Agree somewhat, but think this measure is too extreme."

    You can do Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Southampton Solent with two E's at A-level.
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    I think it's a stupid idea overall.

    I just achieved 3 A's at college in my chosen subject. Someone else in my class got AAC, yet they're definitely more proficient at the subject and have more real experience. I got higher grade because my critical writing skills are awesome and kick my grades up.

    Of course overall this should mean a revamp of college level education, but as it stands, this would mean that I would go to Uni and a more talented student would not.
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    No, because some universities set low conditional offers, and, I know someone who went to Warwick with BBB, and it's not exactly a bad university.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Disagree; simply because grades mean nothing.
    I don't think the work and commitment and time put into getting A grades by students should be treated with ignorance
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    (Original post by Flying Cookie)
    I don't think the work and commitment and time put into getting A grades by students should be treated with ignorance
    Of course. Only somebody with very bad grades would make such a claim.
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    (Original post by .ACS.)
    So what if someone got DDD or DDE or DEE or EEE?
    I'm not making a principled argument either way, but there is a reasonable argument to be made if he'd set the thresh-hold lower, but no less than ABB is just silly.

    I would say, however, than I'm not convinced those achieving DDE are worth the taxpayer's investment to send them to uni. There are of course plenty of good argument against what I just said however, I'm not convinced either way.
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    (Original post by Flying Cookie)
    I don't think the work and commitment and time put into getting A grades by students should be treated with ignorance
    No, of course not, sorry, I'm not saying it should; but university study is entirely different so judging one on the other would be ridiculously flawed.
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    It would seperate the men from the boys. :cool:
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    (Original post by BJack)
    You know that BBBb is half way between AAB and AAA, right?
    Well not really, when people say AAA / AAB , they usually have a fourth AS level at A or B grade aswell.
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    (Original post by Solid_Snake_100)
    Well not really, when people say AAA / AAB , they usually have a fourth AS level at A or B grade aswell.
    The important word here is usually.
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    Not all A grades are created equal..why should someone who gets an A in media studies be given any special treatment over someone who got a B in Chemistry
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    Nah I disagree. I'm pretty capable academic wise but I just couldn't cope at A level. It was a mixture of hating the sixth form I was in, not getting along with teachers, not being able to get the help I required and eventually giving up. For some reason god only knows, I got a place on the course I wanted, at the uni I wanted. I may not have graduated with an amazing result, but it was definitely worth doing. I have also already got myself a job in the direction I want which will, hopefully, allow me to progress in the direction I desire. I couldn't have done this without uni (for many reasons).
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    A better idea would be to have different scores for different subjects. An A in Maths is obviously harder than an A in media studies so it should contribute more to your overall UCAS tariff. With unis asking for minimum tariffs instead of just an AAB regardless of what subjects you do, it would filter out those who only did easier subjects at A level and yet still manage to get in.
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    My opinion is that university shouldn't exclusively be for those who obtain A grades at A-level or equivalent, but for those who have a passion for a subject of their choice. And I agree with ish90han, that in some subjects (like History or English Literature) it is more difficult to get an A grade at A-level or equivalent than others. Should one miss obtaining an A grade, it doesn't mean they lack the enthusiasm or love for a certain subject, it just means they didn't get an A grade in the subject. Then again one can say a favouring for a subject is illustrated through high grades (or to be really technical, UMS marks) in the said subject, possibly in the other remaining subjects taken at A-level. Sorry if all of this doens't make any sense :redface:
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    There's an assumption that good 'A' levels always leads to good degree results. I've known enough people to get spanking results pre-university and flop at degree level. Partly because they think they've made it.
    • PS Helper
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    PS Helper
    Say a person does A-levels in the three sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics). Said person doesn't do great, only achieving CCD, and chose those A-levels because his parents wanted to push him into a career in Medicine. This person is actually better at essay-writing and creative thought, so wants to do a degree in Philosophy. If this person had done A-levels in, say, English Lit, History and Art they could have got AAA (but they didn't, because they couldn't do those A-levels). Should this person then be refused the opportunity to go to uni to study Philosophy because they didn't get an A at A-level, despite having the potential to do extremely well in it? I think not.
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    We'd be going back a step if it's just the rich kids with a better standard of education dominating the best unis
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    (Original post by nuodai)
    Say a person does A-levels in the three sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics). Said person doesn't do great, only achieving CCD, and chose those A-levels because his parents wanted to push him into a career in Medicine. This person is actually better at essay-writing and creative thought, so wants to do a degree in Philosophy. If this person had done A-levels in, say, English Lit, History and Art they could have got AAA (but they didn't, because they couldn't do those A-levels). Should this person then be refused the opportunity to go to uni to study Philosophy because they didn't get an A at A-level, despite having the potential to do extremely well in it? I think not.
    The problem is, unless all universities set their own entrance exams, they have no means of telling if this guy is any good at essay writing.
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    i disagree.
    I think that those who do get an A at A level are more likely to do well at uni than those who get all C's + D's for example, but:
    some subjects are easier than others, so an A in maths is worth far more than an A in say, general studies.
    BBB imo is better than ACC, so just because someone has an A, doesnt mean they are neccesarily that clever!
    i think the UCAS point system works well, although it takes a while to turn points into grades e.g. 300 points = so many C's / B's / A's...
 
 
 
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