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    Bahh
    It's such a sad truth that a warwick graduate with a 2.2 will be rejected ahead of a graduate who is not in the top 20, who got a 2.1.

    It really doesn't make sense to me. It never will.
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    (Original post by agolati)
    Bahh
    It's such a sad truth that a warwick graduate with a 2.2 will be rejected ahead of a graduate who is not in the top 20, who got a 2.1.

    It really doesn't make sense to me. It never will.
    just goes to show how thick these companies are. haha! They aint got a clue how the university system works! a 2:1 from a **** uni is not the same as a 2:1 from a top uni
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    If you're so great why didn't you get a 2:1?
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    Somewhat amused to find this on the front page (after not visiting this forum in quite some time), since this thread is originally from a good 18 months ago. Someone bumped it simply to complain about Real Analysis - not that I blame 'em, Complex was more my kinda thing.

    I have in fact managed to get my foot in the actuarial door, since I got a job covering maternity leave for someone on the Pricing team of a major life insurer. From that I was offered another fixed-term contract on a different team, covering Reserving/Financial Reporting. I've also passed 3 exams, self-supported.

    Now I'm gonna be looking for a full-time trainee position elsewhere (having perhaps foolishly turned down an offer at my current place since I'm looking to move closer to friends), so thanks to JonnySPal for the list of agencies, if nothing else.

    One thing I would like to know is, are these companies usually just looking to fill individual roles, or is it typically a larger intake, a la a graduate scheme which might take on, say 10 people per year? Also, for these graduate schemes or w/e with the larger intakes - how is it they are able to continuously recruit so many people? The place I'm at at the moment would really have no need to recruit so many people, and the senior management would never authorise the resources to do it.
    Am I wrong in assuming these schemes turn out to be fairly dog-eat-dog even after you're hired, with a certain number getting shuffled out the door after some initial time period?

    Another thing is, how ruthless do companies tend to be if you do start failing exams? My place seems fairly reasonable, needing an average of 1 CT per exam sitting on a rolling 2 year basis but I noticed one of the Big 4 advertising their average time to qualification was like 1 year lower than the Profession as a whole. Is that figure jigged cos they mercilessly boot out failures, or is their study support just that good?

    (Original post by eorlingas)
    If you're so great why didn't you get a 2:1?
    I never said I was great and my 2:2 was down to a severe lack of effort, discipline and maturity wrt my degree (more time at the pub...). In any case, you don't need to be great to be an actuary (but it helps ).

    Cheers,

    Kernel
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    (Original post by Kernel)
    Somewhat amused to find this on the front page (after not visiting this forum in quite some time), since this thread is originally from a good 18 months ago. Someone bumped it simply to complain about Real Analysis - not that I blame 'em, Complex was more my kinda thing.

    I have in fact managed to get my foot in the actuarial door, since I got a job covering maternity leave for someone on the Pricing team of a major life insurer. From that I was offered another fixed-term contract on a different team, covering Reserving/Financial Reporting. I've also passed 3 exams, self-supported.

    Now I'm gonna be looking for a full-time trainee position elsewhere (having perhaps foolishly turned down an offer at my current place since I'm looking to move closer to friends), so thanks to JonnySPal for the list of agencies, if nothing else.

    One thing I would like to know is, are these companies usually just looking to fill individual roles, or is it typically a larger intake, a la a graduate scheme which might take on, say 10 people per year? Also, for these graduate schemes or w/e with the larger intakes - how is it they are able to continuously recruit so many people? The place I'm at at the moment would really have no need to recruit so many people, and the senior management would never authorise the resources to do it.
    Am I wrong in assuming these schemes turn out to be fairly dog-eat-dog even after you're hired, with a certain number getting shuffled out the door after some initial time period?

    Another thing is, how ruthless do companies tend to be if you do start failing exams? My place seems fairly reasonable, needing an average of 1 CT per exam sitting on a rolling 2 year basis but I noticed one of the Big 4 advertising their average time to qualification was like 1 year lower than the Profession as a whole. Is that figure jigged cos they mercilessly boot out failures, or is their study support just that good?



    I never said I was great and my 2:2 was down to a severe lack of effort, discipline and maturity wrt my degree (more time at the pub...). In any case, you don't need to be great to be an actuary (but it helps ).

    Cheers,

    Kernel
    I was actually replying to agolati up there, who I thought started this thread...never mind, my bad!
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    (Original post by Kernel)
    Somewhat amused to find this on the front page (after not visiting this forum in quite some time), since this thread is originally from a good 18 months ago. Someone bumped it simply to complain about Real Analysis - not that I blame 'em, Complex was more my kinda thing.

    I have in fact managed to get my foot in the actuarial door, since I got a job covering maternity leave for someone on the Pricing team of a major life insurer. From that I was offered another fixed-term contract on a different team, covering Reserving/Financial Reporting. I've also passed 3 exams, self-supported.

    Now I'm gonna be looking for a full-time trainee position elsewhere (having perhaps foolishly turned down an offer at my current place since I'm looking to move closer to friends), so thanks to JonnySPal for the list of agencies, if nothing else.

    One thing I would like to know is, are these companies usually just looking to fill individual roles, or is it typically a larger intake, a la a graduate scheme which might take on, say 10 people per year? Also, for these graduate schemes or w/e with the larger intakes - how is it they are able to continuously recruit so many people? The place I'm at at the moment would really have no need to recruit so many people, and the senior management would never authorise the resources to do it.
    Am I wrong in assuming these schemes turn out to be fairly dog-eat-dog even after you're hired, with a certain number getting shuffled out the door after some initial time period?

    Another thing is, how ruthless do companies tend to be if you do start failing exams? My place seems fairly reasonable, needing an average of 1 CT per exam sitting on a rolling 2 year basis but I noticed one of the Big 4 advertising their average time to qualification was like 1 year lower than the Profession as a whole. Is that figure jigged cos they mercilessly boot out failures, or is their study support just that good?



    I never said I was great and my 2:2 was down to a severe lack of effort, discipline and maturity wrt my degree (more time at the pub...). In any case, you don't need to be great to be an actuary (but it helps ).

    Cheers,

    Kernel
    -the people with graduate schemes are mainly consultants - they can enlarge or shrink their workload by adjusting prices really (or get rid of more senior people - analysts are cheap). That or they're firms where the graduate scheme encompasses multiple business areas, i.e. including non-actuarial.

    -the big 4 have their choice of people, so, you know, they have little incentive to pick people who can only pass one exam a sitting. Also they're big on development (firm wide) compared to the insurers I've experienced, so they're very generous in their study day allowances and study material funding.

    Not that I've taken a study day in a while...

    I have not experienced any of this 'booting' you mention. I don't think the actuarial world is particularly cut-throat like that.
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    (Original post by Chewwy)
    I have not experienced any of this 'booting' you mention. I don't think the actuarial world is particularly cut-throat like that.
    I'd agree with this. At the company I'm going to be working for they stress that there is no pressure when it comes to exams - they only pay for your first sitting, so I suppose they don't need to pressure you as exam passes mean they just have to pay you more! And my friend at Legal & General said that if he doesn't pass exams "fast enough" (which isn't especially fast - maybe three in two years or something like that) then they take him off the study programme (i.e. stop paying for the exams) until he passes more.
 
 
 
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