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is it easy to get a first class degree from a crap uni Watch

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    (Original post by ChunkymunkyDJC)
    I assumed that they would have the same exams for each uni? I.e. Maths papers are the same at Oxford as they are in Chester.
    Hell no. What would be the point of going to a better university then?

    Getting into better universities usually means :

    1. Harder course content
    2. Better teaching standards

    This is what fuels demands for graduates. It would be a complete waste to teach the same thing to a DDD student and an AAA student.

    Lecturers write and mark the exam papers. Although they are externally moderated in the final year.
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    (Original post by Smtn)
    Hell no. What would be the point of going to a better university then?

    Getting into better universities usually means :

    1. Harder course content
    2. Better teaching standards

    This is what fuels demands for graduates. It would be a complete waste to teach the same thing to a DDD student and an AAA student.

    Lecturers write and mark the exam papers. Although they are externally moderated in the final year.
    Oh right, I just assumed it was a similar style to college/school in that you all take the same test but the teaching is better at some, therefore you're more likely to get a higher grade.
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    (Original post by ChunkymunkyDJC)
    Oh right, I just assumed it was a similar style to college/school in that you all take the same test but the teaching is better at some, therefore you're more likely to get a higher grade.
    No, that would completely undermine the university system. Hadn't you ever asked yourself why going to Oxbridge etc was such a big deal?
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    (Original post by Smtn)
    No, that would completely undermine the university system. Hadn't you ever asked yourself why going to Oxbridge etc was such a big deal?
    Yeah, I had, but I just assumed that in places like Oxbridge you get better teaching and learn more which you don't need to know :p:. I'm doing an unconventional course, not a mickey mouse course :p: - Journalism, so we basically all take the same uni tests (maybe not the same content, but it wouldn't be any more difficult at one uni to the next).
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    (Original post by ChunkymunkyDJC)
    Yeah, I had, but I just assumed that in places like Oxbridge you get better teaching and learn more which you don't need to know :p:. I'm doing an unconventional course, not a mickey mouse course :p: - Journalism, so we basically all take the same uni tests (maybe not the same content, but it wouldn't be any more difficult at one uni to the next).
    You get more teaching time, world renowned lecturers, more pressure to do well and more resources. These combine to form more complex exam papers. Don't forget at Oxbridge the students are supposedly smarter, meaning there's a higher work standard - exam papers would be made and marked to a stupidly high level. It's much more difficult to match 1st class standards.

    Because student ability is different at different universities, exam standards will vary. So in a nutshell, you could end up failing an Oxbridge degree or getting a 3rd, and go and get a 1st with the same amount of work at a lesser uni.

    It's all down to student ability, effort and differing resources/teaching/tuition time.
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    (Original post by Choccielatte)
    You get more teaching time, world renowned lecturers, more pressure to do well and more resources. These combine to form more complex exam papers. Don't forget at Oxbridge the students are supposedly smarter, meaning there's a higher work standard - exam papers would be made and marked to a stupidly high level. It's much more difficult to match 1st class standards.

    Because student ability is different at different universities, exam standards will vary. So in a nutshell, you could end up failing an Oxbridge degree or getting a 3rd, and go and get a 1st with the same amount of work at a lesser uni.

    It's all down to student ability, effort and differing resources/teaching/tuition time.
    Which is why it is ******** when people say what University you go to doesn't matter. Within a certain range this is perhaps true, but try telling me a Economics degree from the West of Scotland University is equivalent to one from Edinburgh.
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    (Original post by Lachlan)
    Which is why it is ******** when people say what University you go to doesn't matter. Within a certain range this is perhaps true, but try telling me a Economics degree from the West of Scotland University is equivalent to one from Edinburgh.
    :o: I'm afraid I'll have to agree - most employers will prefer a person with a 1st class degree from a Top 30 uni with a solid reputation. I'm sure that in some cases, it will depend on the specific degree - but the name of the University is important in some cases. Like for graduate schemes, postgraduate courses etc.

    A degree is meant to be a mark of high quality education; but bottom end universities just seem to take peoples money. Similarly, so many people see Uni as a big party rather than a place to further learning.
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    (Original post by Gaara.)
    I thought the lecturers write the exam papers?? So it wouldn't be the same, but im not 100% sure.
    :laugh:
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    Simple logic and statistics will tell you that it is certainly easier than obtaining a first from a highly ranked university. Anyone who tells you otherwise is either misinformed or can't be reasoned with. However, defining it as easy or not in absolute terms is of course a very difficult thing to do. Introducing a truly philosophical slant, we must have your definition of easy...
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    Do Lecturers write the exams?
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    The university you go to is important but from what i have seen when i look at a similar course being run at a supposed top university and a supposed university i see that the top universities tend to go more into detail but there is always a certain standard of which is reached for instance in economics regardless what year the topics are covered all economics couses cover at least intermediate economics. While the top universities may go beyond this and cover more advanced material. So the material is harder at top universities but does not neccesarily mean you will breeze through a course at a low university. In the end the university you go to does matter as reputation plays an important part. In response to the OP question depending your ability and your at attitude towards the degree will determine how easy it is for you to get a first whether it be at a top university or low university but they is no denying that courses at top universities may touch open more advanced stuff than at lower universities but does not mean that courses at lower universities are of a much more lower standard.
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    (Original post by Kane_Fizz)
    Do Lecturers write the exams?
    For their course, yes.
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    Oh - another thing, for Law and Medicine degrees...

    They need to be of a certain standard in order to be accredited by the relevant bodies. The degree schemes will need to teach similar things at whichever university, but again, the marking of exams will differ so that it may be more/less difficult to get a certain degree class at Uni.

    However, these fields are very competitive and some firms only take students from the Top 5 on their graduate schemes due to the number of applicants.
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    (Original post by Arsenalforev)
    The university you go to is important but from what i have seen when i look at a similar course being run at a supposed top university and a supposed university i see that the top universities tend to go more into detail but there is always a certain standard of which is reached for instance in economics regardless what year the topics are covered all economics couses cover at least intermediate economics. While the top universities may go beyond this and cover more advanced material. So the material is harder at top universities but does not neccesarily mean you will breeze through a course at a low university. In the end the university you go to does matter as reputation plays an important part. In response to the OP question depending your ability and your at attitude towards the degree will determine how easy it is for you to get a first whether it be at a top university or low university but they is no denying that courses at top universities may touch open more advanced stuff than at lower universities but does not mean that courses at lower universities are of a much more lower standard.
    The main issue with a degree in economics is the marked difference in quantitativeness of the differing courses and level of econometrics covered.

    Yes, there may be a basic level achieved by all, but the way the content is approached will be quite different.
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    (Original post by kiss_me_now9)
    Bs and Cs in A levels or GCSEs? Either or, they're not bad grades and a 'bad' uni (eurgh, hate that term) would be looking for Ds and Es
    i dont think thats true to be honest. i think unless you get 3 a's or a,a,b, then you are resigned to a bad uni, usually a met uni. which is unfair cuz you end up going to the same uni as those who got c's and d's
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    (Original post by freeuser)
    i dont think thats true to be honest. i think unless you get 3 a's or a,a,b, then you are resigned to a bad uni, usually a met uni. which is unfair cuz you end up going to the same uni as those who got c's and d's
    Eh? That is wrong on so, so many levels.
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    (Original post by Choccielatte)
    Oh - another thing, for Law and Medicine degrees...

    They need to be of a certain standard in order to be accredited by the relevant bodies. The degree schemes will need to teach similar things at whichever university, but again, the marking of exams will differ so that it may be more/less difficult to get a certain degree class at Uni.

    However, these fields are very competitive and some firms only take students from the Top 5 on their graduate schemes due to the number of applicants.
    You seem to know an awful lot for someone at 6th form. Luckily, you're largely wrong though. All the correct information is on TSR, if you could be bothered to look for it. After graduation, medicine applications are done blindly, so the hospital has no idea where you gained your degree from. In Law, the biggest single determining factor, according to available evidence, is where the partner of the firm you're applying to gained their degree from- it really has shown to be that fickle. In addition typically only 30% or so of LLB undergrads go on to practice law, and its not necessarily the best performing ones either.
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    (Original post by freeuser)
    i dont think thats true to be honest. i think unless you get 3 a's or a,a,b, then you are resigned to a bad uni, usually a met uni. which is unfair cuz you end up going to the same uni as those who got c's and d's
    university quality doesnt have two levels- very good and awful. there are many levels of quality, and universities asking for ABB or BBB eg will be better than those requesting Cs and Ds. eg Birmingham has ABB offers, which is classed as a very well regarded university. Bolton on the other hadn, isnt.
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    You seem to know an awful lot for someone at 6th form. Luckily, you're largely wrong though. All the correct information is on TSR, if you could be bothered to look for it. After graduation, medicine applications are done blindly, so the hospital has no idea where you gained your degree from. In Law, the biggest single determining factor, according to available evidence, is where the partner of the firm you're applying to gained their degree from- it really has shown to be that fickle. In addition typically only 30% or so of LLB undergrads go on to practice law, and its not necessarily the best performing ones either.
    I've finished 6th Form actually. Interestingly, my information in the post you quote came from an Admissions Tutor for Law at Cambridge and various Law students; I've been twice on the Law Conference they run annually. On these conferences, I met several representatives from various Law and financial firms. Clifford Chance representatives said, in brutal tones, that 75% of their graduate employees gained their Law degree from either Oxford or Cambridge and they use the University a candidate has graduated from as a factor for consideration when interviewing.

    I don't profess to know much about medicine, however - I was genuinely unaware of that.
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    (Original post by Choccielatte)
    I've finished 6th Form actually. Interestingly, my information in the post you quote came from an Admissions Tutor for Law at Cambridge and various Law students; I've been twice on the Law Conference they run annually. On these conferences, I met several representatives from various Law and financial firms. Clifford Chance representatives said, in brutal tones, that 75% of their graduate employees gained their Law degree from either Oxford or Cambridge and they use the University a candidate has graduated from as a factor for consideration when interviewing.

    I don't profess to know much about medicine, however - I was genuinely unaware of that.
    And thats one (albeit large and prestigious) law firm. 99% of Law graduates will not be working for firms like that, aspire as they might to that level. Clifford Chance may well look at where the degree was gained from, and so might other firms, but the research into graduate employment on the sector suggests that if you were to apply for a firm headed by Edinburgh graduates, you'd have an advantage over a Strathclyde, and vice versa. It does not follow, and there is no evidence to suggest, that partners of firms will suddenly stop employing graduates of certain universities because that university was 16th in 1998 but 35th in 2008.
 
 
 
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