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    I have ordered a TV yesterday from amazon for 800 pounds:woo:, today I have received this email.

    Your Amazon account including order has been placed on hold as we require further verification to allow us to process your order in a timely and secure manner.

    For us to process and complete your order you will need to fax us the information below relating to the card used to place this order, as we are unable to verify your address as your card issuer has declined our request citing legal and privacy reasons.

    To ensure your fax is handled in a timely manner, please send the following information:
    • A copy of your bank or card statement for the card used, including billing address
    • The last 4 digits of the payment card
    • Your name, e-mail address, phone number and order number.

    Please note that this information must be sent via fax as we are unable to accept attachments via email. For ease of processing, please write your order number and e-mail address clearly at the top of the fax.

    I have faxed everything and I had also spoken with someone from the customer service today.

    Is this a scam ??

    I just cant sleep.


    Thanks.




    Edit: the reason why im worried is:


    Call amazon and make sure this isn't pishing scheme then do what they tell you to. This is from Amazon.com

    Identifying Phishing or Spoofed E-mails

    From time to time, you might receive e-mails that look like they come from Amazon.com, but they are, in fact, falsified. Often these e-mails direct you to a Web site that looks similar to the Amazon.com Web site, where you might be asked to provide account information such as your e-mail address and password combination. Unfortunately, these false Web sites can steal your sensitive information; later, this information may be used to commit fraud. Some phishing messages contain potential viruses or malware that can detect passwords or sensitive data. We recommend that you install an anti-virus program and keep it updated at all times.

    Below are some key points to look for in order to identify these e-mails:

    1. Know what Amazon.com won't ask for

    Amazon.com will never ask you for the following information in an e-mail communication:


    Your social security number or tax identification number
    Your credit card number, PIN number, or credit card security code (including "updates" to any of the above)
    Your mother's maiden name
    Your Amazon.com password

    2. Requests to verify or confirm your account information

    Amazon.com will not ask you to verify or confirm your Amazon.com account information by clicking on a link from an e-mail.

    3. Attachments on suspicious e-mails

    We recommend that you do not open any e-mail attachments from suspicious or unknown sources. E-mail attachments can contain viruses that may infect your computer when the attachment is opened or accessed. If you receive a suspicious e-mail purportedly sent from Amazon.com that contains an attachment, we recommend that you delete it and do not open the attachment.

    4. Grammatical or typographical errors

    Be on the lookout for poor grammar or typographical errors. Some phishing e-mails are translated from other languages or are sent without being proofread, and as a result, contain bad grammar or typographical errors.

    5. Check the return address

    Is the e-mail from Amazon.com? While phishers often send forged e-mail to make it look like it came from Amazon.com, you can sometimes determine whether or not it's authentic by checking the return address. If the "from" line of the e-mail looks like "[email protected]" or "[email protected]," or contains the name of another Internet service provider, you can be sure it is a fraudulent e-mail.

    6. Check the Web site address

    Genuine Amazon.com web sites are always hosted on the "amazon.com" domain--"http://www.amazon.com/. . . " (or "https://www.amazon.com/. . ."). Sometimes the link included in spoofed e-mails looks like a genuine Amazon.com address. You can check where it actually points to by hovering your mouse over the link--the actual Web site where it points to will be shown in the status bar at the bottom of your browser window or as a pop-up.

    We never use a web address such as "http://security-amazon.com/. . ." or an IP address (string of numbers) followed by directories such as "http://123.456.789.123/amazon.com/. . . ."

    Alternately, sometimes the spoofed e-mail is set up such that if you click anywhere on the text you are taken to the fraudulent Web site. Amazon.com will never send an e-mail that does this. If you accidentally click on such an e-mail and go to a spoofed Web site, do not enter any information and just close that browser window.

    7. If an e-mail looks suspicious, go directly to the Amazon.com Web site

    When in doubt, do not click the link included in an e-mail. Just go directly to www.amazon.com and click "Your Account" in the top right menu to view recent purchases, or review your account information. If you cannot access your account, or if you see anything suspicious, let us know right away.

    8. Do not "unsubscribe"

    Never follow any instructions contained in a forged e-mail that claim to provide a method for "unsubscribing." Many spammers use these "unsubscribe" processes to create a list of valid, working e-mail addresses.

    9. Protect your account information

    If you did click through from a spoofed or suspicious e-mail and you entered your Amazon.com account information you should immediately update your Amazon.com password. You can do this through Your Account by choosing the option to "Change your name, e-mail address, or password" found under Account Settings.

    Please be assured that if someone has been able to look at your account, they are not able to see your full credit card information. However, orders can be sent from your account using your credit card so please contact us immediately if you notice any orders that you do not recognize.

    However, if you did submit your credit card number to the site linked to from the forged e-mail message, we advise that you take steps to protect your information. You may wish to contact your credit car
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    Anyone using fax in 2009 is suspect.
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    Dont make me scared please I will call 999 Im so serious.
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    They shouldn't need any of that information. Your bank will have a 24 hour emergency hotline, and if you're using a credit card you should be automatically insured. Indeed, for any card of any type there should certainly be a cancellation window. Get that number asap and call them up- cancel that transaction and get onto amazon tomorrow. Once you know the money isn't going through you can explain the problem to amazon tomorrow. If you need to place the order again once you know it's secure then so be it- better not have a tv than not have a tv and also lose 800 quid.

    All the best.
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    EDIT: Cancel that.

    I wouldnt worry, they only want the last 4 digits.
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    Dont make me scared please I will call 999 Im so serious.
    Don't even think about contacting the authorities, they're in on the scam too.






    Seriously though, forward the e-mail to Amazon customer service to see if it's legit.
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    Don't call 999 ffs. The worst that'll happen is that someone's using your card to pay for stuff, and when that gets flagged up, the card issuer will deal with it and you won't have to pay a penny thanks to protection schemes and card insurance. I found out last week that somebody had been using my card details to rack up thousands of pounds of fraudulent transactions dating right back to the beginning of May. All I had to do was make a quick phone call to RBS's fraud department and it was sorted, causing me no hassle except replacing my credit card.


    If it bothers you that much, phone the card issuer and ask to have the card deactivated, or phone/email Amazon to verify the email. Calling 999 would be a complete waste of the emergency service's time.
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    cancel your card now. That is a scam most definately, that scenario just does not happen.
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    What if I had spoken with Amazon customer service number and they told me about the email, are they thiefs as well. Who should I trust ??
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    As I said, they only want your billing address and the last 4 digits of your number. If you look at your account page on amazon you will notice the last 4 digits are displayed and the rest are * out.

    Don't worry.

    EDIT: last post makes this sound like a troll thread. Actually "so badly as an animal".

    Im calling early troll
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    What if I had spoken with Amazon customer service number and they told me about the email, are they thiefs as well. Who should I trust ??
    Right. What is the exact address the email came from?
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    What if I had spoken with Amazon customer service number and they told me about the email, are they thiefs as well. Who should I trust ??
    No one. Who knows who could be in on it?
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    Asking for extra info by fax is often used by companies. Though I have never had it asked by Amazon.

    1- Check the email address it was sent from e.g. '[email protected]' is a scam.

    2- Contact and ask Amazon if they sent it.

    But it should be fine- as long as you check asap.
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    (Original post by Chiko 1001)
    Right. What is the exact address the email came from?

    [email protected] , If they did scammed me then I will never forgive these *****es.
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    [email protected] , If they have scammed me. I will never forgive these *****es.
    Is that the reply to address?
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    Guys im dead serious, Is this a scam or not ?? please. :woo:
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    Guys im dead serious, Is this a scam or not ?? please. :woo:
    Click reply. What email address is automatically added to the "To:" field?
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    (Original post by Chiko 1001)
    Is that the reply to address?
    What you tryna say mate.
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    (Original post by sron)
    Anyone using fax in 2009 is suspect.
    Fax, surprisingly, is still very widely used among companies.
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    (Original post by Chiko 1001)
    Click reply. What email address is automatically added to the "To:" field?
    OOOW this [email protected] hope its good news.
 
 
 
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