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    you can always reclaim your money from your credit card company (i know barclays does this) but you have to do it immediately if you believe you've been scammed and they'll probably trace the email to the scammer's location (I think)
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    OOOW this [email protected] hope its good news.
    Seriously starting to smell a troll, but if it's an address ending @amazon.co.uk you're fine.
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    (Original post by Chiko 1001)
    Seriously starting to smell a troll, but if it's an address ending @amazon.co.uk you're fine.
    Chiko im not joking I will never ever order products from Amazon, its my first and possibly my last time. I Paid damn 9 pound express delivery it supposed to come today by 1pm stupid monkeys (NO RACISM PEACE 4EVER) . ****. :mad:
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    This guy is a troll - so badly as an animal. Loads of contradictory things said in threads he has made... i.e. thread a few months ago says he is doing GCSEs, yet profile says he studies at Birmingham Uni.
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    this is not a scam, my mate had the same email for verification when she tried to buy a laptop off amazon. they only require proof of payment because its a £800 TV and if its your first time buying it and not a regular amazon user, it make sense for amazon to do this.
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    contact amazon and see wt they say
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    It's also worth noting that the cake is a scam...
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    Guys I have just received a email from the Incredible Amazon.co.uk yes lol.

    Dear Customer,

    Wednesday, July 22, 2009 1:13:39 AM

    Greetings from Amazon.co.uk.

    We regret to inform you that the following items have been delayed as we are still awaiting stock from our suppliers :

    "*** - Glass Stand For Plasma & LCD TV Up To ******** - Black Glass With Chrome Legs"
    Estimated arrival date: *********

    One of Amazon's aims is to provide a convenient and efficient service; in this case, we have fallen short. Please accept our sincere apologies.

    You have not been charged for this item. We do not debit money from your payment card until just before your items are dispatched. We will send you a dispatch confirmation email on the date of dispatch.

    Thank you for shopping at Amazon.co.uk, we hope to see you again.
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    Honestly, Thats Nor Right, You Should Speak To Some-one. I Know Some-one Who Had A Similar Problem, It Definetly Isn't Amazon So Speek To Some-one. !
    Good Luck
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    What if I had spoken with Amazon customer service number and they told me about the email, are they thiefs as well. Who should I trust ??
    oh come on - the entire customer services team of amazon are not out to get you, theres paranoia and then there just idiocy.

    The email defiently seems fishy though, call Customer services to confirm it.

    And life tip no big company will ask you for that kind of info and they certainly wont ask you to fax them. they will phone you
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    All they're asking for is the last four digits of your account number...if they are scammers then there's not a lot they can do with that. I'd agree that it's dodgy if they were asking for your email password/whole account number and any security numbers or pin numbers you have to do with the account.
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    Guys im dead serious, Is this a scam or not ?? please. :woo:
    How did the e-mail start? Was it "Dear Customer" or "Dear [Your Name and Surname here]"?

    If the latter, it's 99% legit, if the former - most certainly a scam. Scammers use general pronouns - because their e-mails are being sent in batches, they're not targetting anyone in particular, rather than just a whole group of e-mail addresses, hoping that someone catches the bait. Same with fake e-mails from bank. Also, does it have any links provided? Do they lead you to an Amazon website, or to an external website in China or something, that just looks like Amazon (check the exact address in your browser, not in the e-mail itself)?
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    (Original post by Hitsit)
    Honestly, Thats Nor Right, You Should Speak To Some-one. I Know Some-one Who Had A Similar Problem, It Definetly Isn't Amazon So Speek To Some-one. !
    Good Luck
    Not only are you wrong, you also wrote your entire post in title case. :mad:
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    How many people actually have a fax machine? I've never used one in my life!
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    why did you change the title of this thread?

    you're breaking my heart man.
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    (Original post by FyreFight)
    Don't call 999 ffs. The worst that'll happen is that someone's using your card to pay for stuff, and when that gets flagged up, the card issuer will deal with it and you won't have to pay a penny thanks to protection schemes and card insurance. I found out last week that somebody had been using my card details to rack up thousands of pounds of fraudulent transactions dating right back to the beginning of May. All I had to do was make a quick phone call to RBS's fraud department and it was sorted, causing me no hassle except replacing my credit card.


    If it bothers you that much, phone the card issuer and ask to have the card deactivated, or phone/email Amazon to verify the email. Calling 999 would be a complete waste of the emergency service's time.
    This. Good advice mate.
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    Oh no, why did you change the name!?!?

    I'm so damn angry, so badly as an animal.
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    This is the worst thread ever.

    You sound like the most paranoid person I've ever heard of.
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    What if I had spoken with Amazon customer service number and they told me about the email, are they thiefs as well. Who should I trust ??

    Is this your first time on the internet?
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    It's not a scam, you idiot.
 
 
 
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