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    Little tip....if you finish the manouver and the put the car into neutral and apply the handbrake and the examiner doesnt say anything, then he/she is happy with it. If it's not right (distance from kerb to great/small) then he/she would ask "are you finished" and you say "no". If your at the stage of sitting your test you should know whats wrong and then correct it accordingly. Just some advice of not earning another minor.
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    Not necessarily, if you've spent ages on this exercise and still haven't got it in after all of the corrections, they may just say "thank you, drive on when you're ready". They may have given you a serious fault for that.

    But generally if they say "that you" or something to that effect, it's probably not right.

    Another tip is not to do the examiner's job. Don't analyse your mistakes and don't keep count of the number of times they mark the paper, there may not be a fault but have just put a mark to say what has been done (controlled stop, reverse park - road or car park) Some may use the tear of strip at the top of the form to remind them of the stops they've done/have to do, hill starts, angled starts and the likes.

    Just drive, it's kinda good if you think you've failed early on (but actually haven't) cos then you just drive as normal, which is all they're looking for, a safe drive.

    Is this gonna be a driving test tip thread?
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    That isn't true because on my first test I thought the car was way too close to the kerb and the guy said "have you finished?" I said no and tried to correct it went horribly wrong and I had to reverse over the kerb etc etc lol. At the end when they brief you he said "When I said have you finished I meant yes you have lets move. If you had set off from there it would have been fine".
    So please don't give such advice when it isn't true in all cases.
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    If it is then my tip is: if you make a mistake deal with it as calmly and effectively as you can and then move on...don't dwell on the mistake.

    I used to have real problems when I made a mistake because I'd be thinking about it so much that I'd mess up everything I did after but once I learnt to put it behind me and stop thinking about it once I'd done it then I got much better.
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    I dont know about that... but if you wear sensible clothes and have a conversation with the driving examiner during the test they seem to pass you... I had a minor which I'm pretty sure my driving instructor has told me on many occasions that "you'll fail for that" and I didn't fail. We didn't stop talking... I'm not even sure he realised half the stuff I was doing...

    ^ entirely dependant on the driving examiner... but it's worth a try

    This sounds pretty bad...
    I'm an okay driver though now... so I think it's okay that I passed... I'm not terrible or anything like that. < just to clarify...

    Also RESCUE REMEDY from boots... may just be placebo, may not... But gosh i was pretty cool throughout the whole thing thanks to that...
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    (Original post by SHABANA)
    So please don't give such advice when it isn't true in all cases.
    My instructor told me this and has done so on countless occasions with other students and this tip has paid off. On my test, the reverse park, i thought i was a little wide but i played along, and secured the car with the handbrake on and car in neutral. The examiner asked if i was finished so naturally i said no, confriming what i thought was wrong and going from a potential major i got nothing.

    I passed first time....you should have judged your position against the kerb, if your ready for your test then you'd have thought all was well but you didn't. Why do you think the pass mark for passing first time is so low? People are going to do their test when they aren't ready.
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    (Original post by ScottD)
    My instructor told me this and has done so on countless occasions with other students and this tip has paid off. On my test, the reverse park, i thought i was a little wide but i played along, and secured the car with the handbrake on and car in neutral. The examiner asked if i was finished so naturally i said no, confriming what i thought was wrong and going from a potential major i got nothing.

    I passed first time....you should have judged your position against the kerb, if your ready for your test then you'd have thought all was well but you didn't. Why do you think the pass mark for passing first time is so low? People are going to do their test when they aren't ready.
    I'm sorry but the advice seems pretty dodgy to me too.

    The examiner may just have a habit of saying "have you finished?" at the end of the manoeuver, regardless of whether you've carried it out acceptably or not. Driving examiners won't intentionally hint when you've done something wrong, that's not what they're there for.

    My instructor used to ask me that question at the end of all my reversing manoeuvers and it didn't mean that something was wrong, he was just making sure I was satisfied with the position and that I wasn't just taking a break to compose myself.

    If you are at a pass standard, as you say, then you should know whether you have parked the car acceptably or not without having to look out for hints from the examiner.

    You said you thought you were a bit wide anyway, but if everything seemed perfect and the examiner said the same thing, would you still adjust your position?

    Better tip IMO would be to follow the examiner's directions and instructions, but don't start reading deep into any simple commands or questions from them and convincing yourself that something is wrong when it isn't.
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    Well if it were okay he wouldn't have said anything to me, if it's at the standard they want. Okay, it may seem dodgy to you but this is not just one examiner, it's the case with all of them at my local test centre. If you don't want to adopt the tip thats fine. I did and it certianly prevented me from failing and same with others who have my instructor and of the course the driving school. It saved my paying out another £62 and more money for the hour lesson and car hire for the test.

    Your call.
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    That simple question could be taken so many ways. The examiner isn't obliged to give you hints and tips or ask if you're finished. If you're on for a pass and you've totally mucked up your parallel park, that question may be asked as a hint for you to sort it out, but it may also be asked as clarification of a pause in the manoeuvre. Some people do spend forever staring into the mirrors not knowing whether to drive on or to continue up the kerb and into someone's garden.

    (Original post by SHABANA)
    That isn't true because on my first test I thought the car was way too close to the kerb and the guy said "have you finished?" I said no and tried to correct it went horribly wrong and I had to reverse over the kerb etc etc lol. At the end when they brief you he said "When I said have you finished I meant yes you have lets move. If you had set off from there it would have been fine".
    So please don't give such advice when it isn't true in all cases.
    Don't blame the threadstarter or the examiner.. it was your decision and yours alone to continue up the kerb. You should have known that you were touching the kerb and either pulled forwards or left it there.

    Best advice really is to practise to the point where you can get it right every time before going for test... and on test day, do what you think is best.
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    (Original post by Advisor)
    be asked as a hint for you to sort it out, but it may also be asked as clarification of a pause in the manoeuvre.
    Surely though, once you've stopped the car, the examiner through all their experience would know that they have reversed such a distance.....thats them now thinking they have completed the manouvre....not sure if i've explained that well but it makes sense
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    sort your shaking clutch leg first of all
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    Don't listen to this thread.
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    (Original post by Advisor)
    That simple question could be taken so many ways. The examiner isn't obliged to give you hints and tips or ask if you're finished. If you're on for a pass and you've totally mucked up your parallel park, that question may be asked as a hint for you to sort it out, but it may also be asked as clarification of a pause in the manoeuvre. Some people do spend forever staring into the mirrors not knowing whether to drive on or to continue up the kerb and into someone's garden.

    Don't blame the threadstarter or the examiner.. it was your decision and yours alone to continue up the kerb. You should have known that you were touching the kerb and either pulled forwards or left it there.

    Best advice really is to practise to the point where you can get it right every time before going for test... and on test day, do what you think is best.
    I wasn't taking anybody's advice when I did that. I was making the point that just because the examiner asks "are you finished" it does not mean that you should do something to correct it. Also, I knew I was going up the kerb, it is just that I didn't feel as I had enough room to pull out because I was too close to the car in front. I was also too close to the kerb so close that I couldn't straighten the wheel whilst going back. I told him this though, that I had to reverse over the kerb to get out.
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    (Original post by Rizzletastic)
    Don't listen to this thread.
    Agreed
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    (Original post by ScottD)
    My instructor told me this and has done so on countless occasions with other students and this tip has paid off. On my test, the reverse park, i thought i was a little wide but i played along, and secured the car with the handbrake on and car in neutral. The examiner asked if i was finished so naturally i said no, confriming what i thought was wrong and going from a potential major i got nothing.

    I passed first time....you should have judged your position against the kerb, if your ready for your test then you'd have thought all was well but you didn't. Why do you think the pass mark for passing first time is so low? People are going to do their test when they aren't ready.
    Apart from that I only had a few minors, 4 I think. I did that because I went against my own better judgement of where I should stop and start steering in the opposite direction. The second time I did the opposite and ended up too wide. In both those tests I just didn't do what I normally did in lessons I thought I was playing it safe. The third time I did exactly what I did in lessons and did the reverse park perfectly. I don't think that just because the examiner says "are you finished?" it means right I must do something to adjust this. In my case, it didn't. So that proves that it does not always mean that you need to start changing something.
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    Seriously, why do people make threads like this.

    All examiners are different, some may just say it to make sure that the candidate has completed the manoeuvre, the examiner can then give the next set of instructions.
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    sort your shaking clutch leg first of all
    Hahaha! Mine used to shake sooo much when I was nervous, it really didn't help at all.
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    (Original post by Myiesha_90)
    but if you...have a conversation with the driving examiner during the test they seem to pass you...
    My instructor's just told me the opposite...he said that they usually ask you something like "So what would you be doing today if you weren't sitting your test" or something and then that's all the small talk they'll make. he said that if you talk to them, they'll talk to you, but if you fail they'll say it's because you were talking and talking is another task to perform.

    (I haven't actually done a test to see this for myself though)
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    (Original post by C274)
    My instructor's just told me the opposite...he said that they usually ask you something like "So what would you be doing today if you weren't sitting your test" or something and then that's all the small talk they'll make. he said that if you talk to them, they'll talk to you, but if you fail they'll say it's because you were talking and talking is another task to perform.

    (I haven't actually done a test to see this for myself though)
    Well it was mainly driving talk... like i asked how many tests they have every day and then he started describing all these anecdotes of previous tests. He was the one doing most of the talking in all honesty so maybe I hit the jackpot...

    AND Maybee just maybe my driving instuctor made me think minors were serious faults just so that I was extra prepared. After some conversation with other people who recently took the test I'm starting to feel that he was a bit too harsh sometimes... guess its worked in my favour in the end though....

    I'm more relaxed when I'm not fully concentrating on the driving itself too... so perhaps it was all in my head... good luck though... If you do think that my advice will fail you don't even go there... Don't want anyone to fail because of me! I just went on my insticts of him being a "chatty" person so I went for it... lol
 
 
 
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