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    Can anyone provide me a full reading list for undergraduate medicine, listing all modules/strands etc along with the recommended books for each strand for each year? The university itself is irrelevant.
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    surely the university is the most relevant bit?
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    surely the university is the most relevant bit?

    What I am trying to say is that I'm happy with a full list from any university, since I am not a medical student. If you do provide a list, then the name of the university would be good.
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    (Original post by koolkuzz)
    What I am trying to say is that I'm happy with a full list from any university, since I am not a medical student. If you do provide a list, then the name of the university would be good.
    Oh right ok, take it you're just interested in reading about it then. Unfortunately i am not a med student either so i can't really help XD sorry
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    What exactly is it you want this for?

    We're never given a "full" reading list for our course (Cambridge) - there are some recommended books for each section of the undergrad curriculum but no really essential reading, so it'd be very hard to give you what you're after. I suspect similar may be true for other places.
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    (Original post by koolkuzz)
    Can anyone provide me a full reading list for undergraduate medicine, listing all modules/strands etc along with the recommended books for each strand for each year? The university itself is irrelevant.
    I could but I'm not going to as it's completely pointless. If you're not a med student what possible use could it be, and if you were a med student you'd realise how daft your request is.

    I'm in a bad mood.
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    (Original post by theatrical)
    I could but I'm not going to as it's completely pointless. If you're not a med student what possible use could it be, and if you were a med student you'd realise how daft your request is.

    I'm in a bad mood.

    yes u r in a bad mood, as I have said what I use it for is completely irrelevant....don't bother replying to this thread if you cant answer my request.
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    I'm going to give you our full preclinical reading list, just so you can go away. It's for the first 2 years of UCL (note there is no reading list for the clinical part of the course)

    Anatomy
    *Dean MC & Pegington J. Core Anatomy for students Vol 1 The limbs & vertebral column; Vol 2 The thorax, abdomen, pelvis & perineum; Vol 3 Head and Neck; WB Saunders, 1996
    Moore KL & Agur AMR. Essential Clinical Anatomy, 2nd edition, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2002
    Drake R, Vogl W & Mitchell A, Gray's Anatomy for Students, Churchill Livingstone, 2004
    Gosling JA.,Harris, P.F., et al.. Human anatomy. Colour atlas and text 4th edition, Mosby,2002
    Lumley, J.S.P. Surface anatomy. 3rd edition. Churchill Livingston, 2002.
    Weir J & Abrahams PH. Imaging Atlas of Human Anatomy. 3rd edition, Mosby, 2003
    Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
    *Bender DA. Introduction to Nutrition and Metabolism, 3rd edition, Taylor & Francis, 2002
    Champe PC, Harvey RA & Ferrier DR. Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews, Biochemistry, 3rd edition, Lippincott-Williams & Wilkins, 2005
    For reference:
    Baynes JW & Dominiczak MH. Medical Biochemistry, 2nd edition, Elsevier-Mosby, 2005
    Elliott WH & Elliott DC. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd edition, Oxford University Press, 2005
    Frayn KN. Metabolic Regulation: a Human Perspective, 2nd edition, Blackwell Science, 2003
    Smith C, Marks AD & Lieberman M. Marks’ Basic Medical Biochemistry, 2nd edition, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2005
    Cancer Biology
    King RJB. Cancer Biology 2nd edition, Pearson Education, 2000 [3rd edition due 2005]
    Spence RAJ & Johnston PG. Oncology, Oxford University Press, 2001 (This is available in the library but is out of print)
    Clinical Skills
    *Epstein O. Clinical examination, 3rd edition, Mosby 2003
    *Dacre J. Handbook of clinical skills, Manson 2002 (Available online at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/webct)
    Communications Skills
    *Lloyd M & Bor R. Communication skills for medicine, 2nd edition, Churchill Livingstone, 2004
    Coulehan JL & Block MR. The medical interview: mastering skills for clinical practice, 4th edition, FA Davis Company, 2001
    Myerscough PR & Ford M. Talking with Patients : keys to good communication, 3rd edition, Oxford University Press, 1996
    Community-Orientated Medicine
    (This is a part of your learning that is primarily based on experience rather than reading. However, you will find the following books & web sites supportive of this learning)
    Helman, CG. Culture, Health & Illness 4th edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2000
    Henley A & Schott J. Culture, Religion and Patient Care in a Multi-Ethnic Society, Age Concern Books, 1999
    http://cindex.camden.gov.uk/ (Website of Camden Council Use Cindex database for details of 6000+ services)
    http://www.disability.gov.uk/ (a UK government Web site)
    http://www.lmca.org.uk/ (the Web site of the Long Term Medical Conditions Alliance)
    http://www.who.int/en/ (the World Health Organisation Web site)
    Developmental Biology:
    Your main learning tool will be ‘The Embryonic Disk’, a Windows application available free in UCL cluster-rooms and at low cost on CD-ROM for use off-campus – for details, see http://www.embryonic-disk.org
    For reference:
    *Carlson BM. Human Embryology & Developmental Biology, Mosby, 3rd edition, 2004
    or *Larsen WJ. Essentials of Human Embryology, Churchill Livingstone, 1998
    or Larsen WJ. Human Embryology, Churchill Livingstone, 3rd edition, 2001
    or Wolpert L. Principles of Development 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, 2002
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    Endocrine Systems & Regulation
    *Brook C & Marshall NJ. Essential Endocrinology 4th edition, Blackwell Science, 2001
    For reference:
    Baulieu E-E & Kelly PA (Eds). Hormones: From Molecules to Disease, Chapman & Hall, 1990
    Epidemiology
    Beaglehole R, Bonita R & Kjellstrom T. Basic Epidemiology, WHO, 1993
    Coggon D, Rose G & Barker DJP. Epidemiology for the uninitiated, 5th edition, BMJ Publishing Group, 2003 (4th edition available on line at http://www.bmj.com/collections/epidem/epid.shtml)
    Ethics & Law
    *Hope T, Savulescu J & Hendrick J. Medical Ethics and Law: the core curriculum, Churchill Livingstone, 2003 (A good all-purpose background & reference book) 23
    Stauch M, Wheat K & Tingle, J. Sourcebook of Medical Law, 2nd edition, Cavendish, 2002
    Kennedy I & Grubb A. Medical Law, 3rd edition, Butterworth, 2000
    Brazier M. Medicine, Patients and the Law, 3rd edition, Penguin, 2003
    Glover J. Causing death and saving lives, Penguin, 1990
    Singer P. Practical ethics, 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press, 1993
    Department of Health – Consent information and forms http://www.dh.gov.uk/Home/fs/en
    Evaluation of Evidence
    *Petrie A & Sabin C. Medical statistics at a glance, 2nd edition, Blackwell Science, 2005
    Bland M. An introduction to medical statistics, 3rd edition, Oxford Medical, 2000
    Campbell MJ. Medical statistics: a commonsense approach, 3rd edition, Wiley, 1999 [4th edition due 2006]
    Straus SE, et al, Evidence Based Medicine, 3rd edition, Churchill Livingstone, 2005
    Genetics
    Mange EJ & Mange AP. Basic human genetics, 2nd edition, Sinauer Associates, 1999
    Strachan T & Read AP. Human molecular genetics, 3rd edition, Garland Press, 2004 Turnpenny P & Ellard S. Emery's elements of medical genetics, 12th edition, Elsevier Churchill Livingstone, 2005
    Health Promotion
    Naidoo J & Wills J. Health Promotion: Foundations for Practice, 2nd edition, Bailliere Tindall, 2000
    Ewles L & Simnett I. Promoting health: A practical guide, 5th edition, Bailliere Tindall, 2002
    Histology
    Young B & Heath JW. Wheater’s Functional Histology, 4th edition, Churchill-Livingstone, 2000 The 4th edition includes a CD ROM, but a second hand copy of the 2nd or 3rd edition will serve you perfectly well
    Ross MH, Kaye GI & Pawlina W. Histology: a text & atlas, 4th edition, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins [5th edition due 2005]
    Immunology:
    Lydyard P, Whelan A & Fanger MF. Instant Notes in Immunology, 2nd edition, Bios Scientific Publisher, 2003
    Playfair JHL & Lydyard PM. Medical Immunology Made Memorable, Churchill Livingstone, 2000
    Mechanisms of Drug Action
    *Rang, HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM & Moore PK. Pharmacology, 5th edition, Churchill Livingstone, 2003
    Waller GD,. Renwick AG & Hillier K. Medical pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2nd edition, WB Saunders, 2005
    Lullmann H, Mohr K, Ziegler A & Bieger D. Color Atlas of Pharmacology, Thieme, 2000 [3rd edition due 2005]
    Neal MJ. Medical Pharmacology at a glance, 4th Edition, Blackwell Science, 2002 [5th edition due 2005]
    Microbiology
    Timbury MC, McCartney AC, Thakker B & Ward KN. Notes on Medical Microbiology, Churchill Livingstone, 2002
    Gillespie SH & Bamford KB. Medical Microbiology & Infection at a Glance, 2nd edition, Blackwell Science, 2003
    Neuroscience
    *Kingsley RE. Concise Text of Neuroscience, 2nd edition. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2000
    Bear MF, Connors,BW & Paradiso MA. Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, 2nd edition, Lippicott,Williams & Wilkins, 2001 (non-clinical - useful neuroscience background) [3rd edition due 2006]
    Psychology
    Baum A, Newman S, Weinman J, West R & McManus C. Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health & Disease, Cambridge University Press, 1997
    Kent G & Dalgleish M. Psychology & Medical Care, 3rd Ed, Bailliere-Tindall, 1996 (This is available in the library but is out of print)
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    Physiology
    *Pocock G & Richards CD. Human Physiology – the Basis of Medicine, 2nd edition Oxford University Press, 2004
    Widmaier, E. P., et al. Vander, Sherman and Luciano's Human Physiology, 9th edition. Boston, McGraw Hill, 2004
    Levy MN, Koeppen BM & Stanton BA. Berne & Levy Principles of Physiology 4th edition, Mosby, 2005 (due for publication in October)
    Davies A, Blakeney AGH & Kidd C. Human Physiology, Churchill-Livingstone, 2001
    For reference:
    Abelow B. Understanding acid-base, Williams & Wilkins, 1998
    West JB Respiratory Physiology : the essentials, 7th Edition Lippincott, 2005
    Davies A & Moores C The Respiratory System: Basic science and clinical conditions. Churchill-Livingstone, 2003
    Field M, Pollock C & Harris, D, The Renal System: Basic science and clinical conditions. Churchill-Livingstone, 2001
    Noble A, Johnson R, Thomas A & Bass P The cardiovascular System: Basic science and clinical conditions. Churchill-Livingstone, 2005
    Johnson LR. Gastrointestinal Physiology, 6th edition, Mosby, 2000
    Kindlen S, Physiology for Health Care and Nursing, 2nd edition Churchill Livingstone, 2003 is recommended for those students with a limited background in biology but would not be suitable for the more in depth material.
    Pathology
    Lakhani, SR, Dilly, SA, & Finlayson, CJ Basic Pathology: An Introduction to the Mechanisms of Disease, 3rd edition, Edward Arnold, 2003
    Lydyard, P, Lakhani, SR et al Pathology Integrated – an A-Z of Disease & its Pathogenesis, Edward Arnold, 2000
    Woolf, N Cell, Tissue & Disease: the Basis of Pathology, 3rd Edition, WB Saunders, 2000
    Sociology
    *Scambler, G (Ed) Sociology as Applied to Medicine, 5th Edition, WB Saunders, 2003
    Reproductive Biology
    Johnson MH & Everitt BJ. Essential reproduction, 5th edition, Blackwell, 2000
    Porterfield SP. Endocrine physiology, 2nd edition, Mosby, 2001



    Knock yourself out.
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    Having a full reading list is neither needed nor recommended as you will burn out in the first week. But the list Spencer Wells has produced is pretty exhaustive.

    What I recommend is that you pick a good physiology book, a good anatomy book, and a good biochemistry book, and a good pharmacology book. That's often grossly enough to suffice most of the time, and I'd go so far as buy these books.

    If you feel unsure about something when you come across it in a lecture, and the physiology book doesn't suffice or still leaves you with questions (or you find yourself very interested and just want to find out more!) then go for a specialist book in a specific area such as Cardiovascular physiology, Neurosciences, Endocrinology, etc. and you will get immersed in a more complete explanation.

    You'll be hard pushed to find someone who has read every single book on the list for the sake of passing the pre-clinical phase! And I know too well that when you get to this level, it isn't too uncommon to find various small contradictory elements between different texts!
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    Is the oxford handbook of medical sciences much cop?
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    (Original post by Alex D)
    Is the oxford handbook of medical sciences much cop?
    Never used it myself, the reviews are good but I'd worry that they've stripped it down to the bare minimum when you'll actually need to know a fair bit more as a per-clin student.
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    Aberdeen

    First year:
    Basic Sci for Med Module:
    Lippincotts Biochemistry
    Emery's Elements of Medical Genetics
    Vander's Human Physiology

    Systems 1 & 2:
    Vander's Human Phys
    Moore & Agur Essential Clinical Anatomy
    Pharmacology At A Glance/ Rang & Dale Pharm

    Community:
    Health & Illness in the Community (Taylor, Smith, Van Teij...n)

    Year 2:
    Kumar & Clarke Clinical Medicine
    Underwood's General & Systemic Pathology
    Macleod's Clinical Examination
    Essential Orthopaedics (Dandy or Apley)
    Essential Surgery
    Health & Illness in the Community
    Microbiology/Infection (can't remember it's real name)

    Why on earth you want this I can't figure out.....
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    (Original post by koolkuzz)
    Can anyone provide me a full reading list for undergraduate medicine, listing all modules/strands etc along with the recommended books for each strand for each year? The university itself is irrelevant.
    Sounds like someone is far too keen. I haven't read the rest of the thread so some of this may be contradictory to what others are saying, but.... don't start reading anything or buying any books till you get there. You are wasting your time - you need to see which Uni you are actually going to. Even then, alot changes between years and new books are published all the time.

    If you insist on reading then sign up to the student BMJ, anything beyond that is seriously a waste of your time and money.

    Even after you've started and bought lots of books, like I did, you only seem to use four or five of them in Clinical Years.

    Your choice but I think you'll be making a fatal error by starting to read now. You'll just confuse yourself.
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    (Original post by Spacecam)

    Your choice but I think you'll be making a fatal error by starting to read now. You'll just confuse yourself.
    This is so true, there is no point going out and spending so much money on these books. I'm doing a project on malaria and I'm using medical textbooks to understand the disease, and it literally takes me up to five minutes to read one paragraph with having to look up every second word to try and understand the meaning. It really is a massive amount of effort to try and understand what I'm reading. Don't bother! Read new scientist!
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    Aside from that, the point of a textbook is to answer particular questions and do a job, to me at least. Unless I attack the library with a good idea of what I want already, I just sink in trivia and end up with pub quiz medicine. The book you use is obviously dependent on your own understanding, do you need something which lays out the principles of an anatomy or physiology to get you started, do you need something more detailed, perhaps for second year exams or do you need more of an index (Like OHCM) which is garbage unless you already have a good grip on the concepts and terminology but which fills in the memory gaps in a tight spot?
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    (Original post by Alex D)
    Is the oxford handbook of medical sciences much cop?
    I like it. It's written in revision-notes style rather than lots of prose and thus covers everything you need to know, in enough detail to give you a basic overview/jog your memory but not enough to be your only, or even a major, textbook. It's very, very useful at explaining those awkward concepts you (read:I :p: ) keep losing a grip on.

    Is cross-referenced with 'Cheese & Onion' though as I don't have this (am hoping my college library does!) so can't tell you if that's useful.
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    (Original post by Madprof)
    I like it. It's written in revision-notes style rather than lots of prose and thus covers everything you need to know, in enough detail to give you a basic overview/jog your memory but not enough to be your only, or even a major, textbook. It's very, very useful at explaining those awkward concepts you (read:I :p: ) keep losing a grip on.

    Is cross-referenced with 'Cheese & Onion' though as I don't have this (am hoping my college library does!) so can't tell you if that's useful.
    Thanks When I had a flick through it seemed pretty good for brushing up on stuff, think I might order it and have a flick through :p: Is cheese and onion, the OH of clinical medicine?
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    Whats the point of this? You are not even a medical student...

    I think you are being overly ambitious, you aren't going to even read one of them
 
 
 
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