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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_...b=42&x=28&y=12
    ....
    What do they mean by graduate prospects?

    ...

    This is what they say.


    "The data were derived from the HESA Destination of Leavers from HE (DLHE) Record. Source: HESA 2007/8 based on 2007 graduates."

    However the figures differ from those given in Unistats for the DLHE survey.
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    Meh. I hardly give a rats arse about league tables, especially since they started having a heavy weighting on simply research. Unis like to brag about how much finding, how much they recieve and how many quality papers their researches produce, but I doubt this hardly affects how good an education you would recieve (I'm not saying there isn't a correlation mind).

    I was always under the impression that for maths, the order for a long time had been:
    1. Cambridge
    2. Oxford
    3. Warwick, Imperial and UCL all claiming 3rd :P

    Problem is, not all employers would really understand, or bother researching where graduates actually come from who have had the best education. I reckon a lot of them would just look at league tables and decide who the best candidates are from that!
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    (Original post by jakash)
    I was always under the impression that for maths, the order for a long time had been:
    1. Cambridge
    2. Oxford
    3. Warwick, Imperial and UCL all claiming 3rd :P
    This is a common misconception. Despite being a great university, UCL's maths department is nothing special. Places like Bristol, Manchester, Bath, Edinburgh, Southampton and a few others others deserve more credit.

    (Original post by jakash)
    I reckon a lot of them would just look at league tables and decide who the best candidates are from that!
    No. Most employers (90%+) would choose candidates based on interview/assessment centre performance (and generally you need a 2.1 as well as good results in online numercal/verbal tests to get to that stage). Some of the top bulge bracket investment banks have screening process which filters candidates based on the university you attend but they only make up a small proportion of graduate employers.
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    (Original post by jakash)
    Meh. I hardly give a rats arse about league tables, especially since they started having a heavy weighting on simply research. Unis like to brag about how much finding, how much they recieve and how many quality papers their researches produce, but I doubt this hardly affects how good an education you would recieve (I'm not saying there isn't a correlation mind).

    I think that's a common misconception. For most research intensive universities a large proportion of the departments funding comes through QR rather than just from number of students. QR money is determined by the RAE results, but it is largely not spent specifically on research, it just goes on every thing the department needs like secretaries and academic staff. So in an important way prospective undergraduates should look at Research Power as a performance indicator. Studying in an impoverished department is not going to be much fun.

    (Original post by jakash)
    I was always under the impression that for maths, the order for a long time had been:
    1. Cambridge
    2. Oxford
    3. Warwick, Imperial and UCL all claiming 3rd :P

    Almost right. Not UCL as they are well down relative to other maths departments (a "reverse salient" at UCL). I cannot see academics at UCL maths department claiming to be comprable with COWI. Also the order of COWI is debatable except mainly to put Cambridge first.

    (Original post by jakash)
    Problem is, not all employers would really understand, or bother researching where graduates actually come from who have had the best education. I reckon a lot of them would just look at league tables and decide who the best candidates are from that!
    Not exactly. There is some evidence they look at overall league table positions not subject specific. Big employers have their own league tables -- their HR departments see how graduates do from each university where they recruit. They then preferentially recruit at one where graduate recruits have done well. Big employers also use psychometric tests, A-level grades and lots of other screening tests.

    That said companies who specifically want maths graduates tend to be more like "insiders" knowing which maths departments are good and would generally agree with academics, and that correlates well with indicators such as Research Power and DTA allocation (see relevant sections in http://www.maths.manchester.ac.uk/~b...s_league/2009/)
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    One thing to bear in mind:

    In small to 'small-medium' companies (R&D < 40 people, say), recruitment is NOT being done by recruitment/HR people, it's being done by employees who were (probably) recruited for their own mathematical skills. Those people are going to largely be judging on their own (half-remembered) experiences at university and (to some extent) what the league tables were in their day and age. They're not going to be making careful assessments of the course content between universities (though they may well assess what individual candidates would have studied), and I suspect reputation is going to count for a lot.

    [I've always worked in companies of that kind of size. And in cases where I've been involved in interviewing, I know we didn't do anything more advanced than 'gut feel' (aka prejudice) about which universities were going to be have the better candidates].
 
 
 
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