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    (Original post by Revenged)
    osteoporosis is a bone density 2.5 standard deviations below the average peak bone density. so anything that increases bone density (even in your twenties) will provide you with a greater reserve for old age.
    ...but you still NEED to exercise to maintain bone density in old age, exercising while young just isn't enough.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Ok shin splints are a term given to any pain in the front of your leg, but the main causes which won't simply go away with time are overuse and compartment syndrome.
    lol, don't think you'd be running anywhere if you had compartment syndrome because your leg would be bursting open.

    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Cold water stimulates vasoconstriction, this reduces blood flow to muscle and inhibits healing.
    What healing? It'll remove the lactate more quickly from muscles and reduce muscle pain. Microtrauma repair won't be affected by a 20 minute cold/hot shower.
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    (Original post by Scipio)
    What healing? It'll remove the lactate more quickly from muscles and reduce muscle pain.
    To remove lactate (and other waste metabolites) and transport in substrates for recovery (ie; glucose, amino acids, etc), you need good blood flow.

    What happens when you subject your body to extreme cold (eg; a cold shower)? Blood is shunted away from superficial veins, blood vessels constrict to reduce heat loss, etc - reducing peripheral blood flow.

    Alternating hot and cold showers cause a mixture of vasodilation and vasoconstriction thereby improving blood flow and aiding recovery.

    (Original post by Scipio)
    Microtrauma repair won't be affected by a 20 minute cold/hot shower.
    Then why is it widely touted by professional athletes and coaches? What do they know?
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    To remove lactate (and other waste metabolites) and transport in substrates for recovery (ie; glucose, amino acids, etc), you need good blood flow.

    What happens when you subject your body to extreme cold (eg; a cold shower)? Blood is shunted away from superficial veins, blood vessels constrict to reduce heat loss, etc - reducing peripheral blood flow.

    Alternating hot and cold showers cause a mixture of vasodilation and vasoconstriction thereby improving blood flow and aiding recovery.
    To remove lactate quickly, it helps to cause vasoconstriction as it removes blood and takes with it the lactic acid. The recovery process involved in microtrauma takes days, the immediate affects of having vasodilation or vasoconstriction won't change this. Besides, the pain/stiffness from cardiovascular training is caused largely by the lactic acid not from anything else.


    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Then why is it widely touted by professional athletes and coaches? What do they know?
    By that I meant it won't be adversely affected, whether it be a hot or a cold shower. Athletes do it to remove lactic acid.
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    Does taking days off also apply to long walks? Should you also take days off from walking?
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Tom didn't propose cross training, he proposed giving up running completely.
    What I suggested was cross training, I suggested doing other sports e.g. cycling and swimming to help with the running. I think the running should be done on a treadmill though to reduce injuries to the legs.

    Cross-training in sports and fitness refers to the combining of exercises to work various parts of the body. Often one particular activity works certain muscle groups, but not others, Cross-training aims to eliminate this. Running, for example, is excellent for endurance, and prolonged use of the large muscle groups in the legs. A runner may lift weights in order to build muscle and increase upper body strength, things that running cannot provide.
    That was from my AQA textbook.

    Swimming works nearly every muscle in the body, if you are doing all the strokes correctly. This would therefore help with her running, cycling works on the legs and so would help with the running even though she isn't actually running. So she isn't pounding her legs into the pavement and she still gets the same benefits.
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    (Original post by Gypsy King)
    Please disregard everything in this post, for your own sake.
    Most, if not all of what I put is correct so why are you dismissing it? Everything I put is based on what I've learnt from GCSE P.E and my own training schedule. I think I would know whether or not it would work.

    Shin Splints can be cased by an:

    Overused muscle

    One cause is an overused muscle, either as an acute injury or delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The muscle pain is caused by any activity that involves running, jumping, also sometimes even walking. Untreated shin splints can lead to a stress reaction mid-shaft in the tibia, which can eventually lead to a stress fracture. A stress fracture can be diagnosed by a bone scan or an MRI and takes much longer to heal than shin splints.
    So what part of what I put was incorrect, because you have just said don't listen to the advice even though other people have since said that I was correct.

    Everytime I've had an ice bath the next day I don't feel sore in my legs because the lactic acid has gone.
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    You said shin splints were cracks in the bones. They're not.
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    (Original post by Scipio)
    You said shin splints were cracks in the bones. They're not.
    LMAO!
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    (Original post by sleekchic)
    Does taking days off also apply to long walks? Should you also take days off from walking?
    I don't think you really need off days formere walking, infact, most basic mediocre cardio can be done 7 days a week without much effect - simply because, most of the time you don't need a WHOLE day for rest.
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    (Original post by ma2k5)
    I don't think you really need off days formere walking, infact, most basic mediocre cardio can be done 7 days a week without much effect - simply because, most of the time you don't need a WHOLE day for rest.
    Thank you
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    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    What I suggested was cross training, I suggested doing other sports e.g. cycling and swimming to help with the running. I think the running should be done on a treadmill though to reduce injuries to the legs.
    This is what you said:

    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    Instead of running how about you cycle or swim. You generally get the same benefits (I think) plus you don't damage your bones as much because when you swim there is resistance so you work harder but there is a smaller impact on the muscles and bones in terms of damage. When you cycle your not pounding away at the pavement which in the long term can cause 'shin splints' which are little cracks in the bone, the only way to get rid of them is to rest for a few weeks I believe depending on how bad they are.
    If you meant to mention cross training it certainly didn't come across that way in any way shape or form. It came very much across that other people put those words into your mouth at a later date. Meh.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    This is what you said:



    If you meant to mention cross training it certainly didn't come across that way in any way shape or form. It came very much across that other people put those words into your mouth at a later date. Meh.
    I don't have to mention the words 'cross-training' because it's fairly obvious that it's what I meant especially when I suggested using other sports to help with the running. That is cross-training. Anyone with a remote interest in fitness would know that.
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    (Original post by Scipio)
    You said shin splints were cracks in the bones. They're not.
    What is a stress fracture? A crack in the bone. Simple as.
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    I thought it was a microfractures on the surface of the bone. Its known as medial tibial stress syndrome. I had it where it swells up and i can barely walk, took over a month to go. Besides why are you guys on about it OP didn't even say she had a shin splint?
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    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    I don't have to mention the words 'cross-training' because it's fairly obvious that it's what I meant especially when I suggested using other sports to help with the running. That is cross-training. Anyone with a remote interest in fitness would know that.
    No it wasn't obvious, you talked about swimming and cycling INSTEAD of running, not to supplement an existing routine. You then waffled on about running having a higher risk of injury. It was only after after people pointed out the errors of your ways and suggesting cross training that you grasped onto that fact and started recommending cross training (probably to try and save face).

    For example, if I told people to eat vitamin pills instead of eating a healthy diet and waffled on about pesticides is it apparent that I was recommending the use of supplements alongside an existing healthy diet? No, not in any way shape or form, in fact I'd be saying the opposite.

    I know you've done a GCSE in PE but that counts for sweet fa. You recommend running on a treadmill, tbh that is little better than running on concrete or tarmac, grass being the ideal.

    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    What is a stress fracture? A crack in the bone. Simple as.
    Fractures can be a symptom of shin splints but they aren't a cause.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    No it wasn't obvious, you talked about swimming and cycling INSTEAD of running, not to supplement an existing routine. You then waffled on about running having a higher risk of injury. It was only after after people pointed out the errors of your ways and suggesting cross training that you grasped onto that fact and started recommending cross training (probably to try and save face).

    For example, if I told people to eat vitamin pills instead of eating a healthy diet and waffled on about pesticides is it apparent that I was recommending the use of supplements alongside an existing healthy diet? No, not in any way shape or form, in fact I'd be saying the opposite.

    I know you've done a GCSE in PE but that counts for sweet fa. You recommend running on a treadmill, tbh that is little better than running on concrete or tarmac, grass being the ideal.



    Fractures can be a symptom of shin splints but they aren't a cause.
    Theres no point trying to talk to you. Other people got what I was saying so yh whatever.
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    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    What is a stress fracture? A crack in the bone. Simple as.
    Shin splints could LEAD to a stress fracture. They aren't a stress fracture themselves.
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    (Original post by Gazcobain)
    Shin splints could LEAD to a stress fracture. They aren't a stress fracture themselves.
    Yh I know but I was saying that Shin splints could mean that you develop cracks in the shin if you overuse them and don't rest. Obviously 1.6 miles isn't enough to cause it but still.
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    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    Yh I know but I was saying that Shin splints could mean that you develop cracks in the shin if you overuse them and don't rest. Obviously 1.6 miles isn't enough to cause it but still.
    That's not what you said at all. What you said was this:

    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    When you cycle your not pounding away at the pavement which in the long term can cause 'shin splints' which are little cracks in the bone
    ...which they're not.
 
 
 
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