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    (Original post by Audrey Hepburn)
    Going back to stuff about oxford life, I'm glad your friends have enjoyed their time but myself and the majority of the people that I hang around with found that the whole 'prestigious' ideal of oxford became somewhat less bright when we found ourselves drowning in work and being metaphorically whipped by numerous tutors who don't register the need for time outside academics in a city with only one halfway decent club. But again, obviously I can't speak for everyone or even most people as I only know a small fraction of the university.
    You're not a chemist by any chance are you?
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    (Original post by Rustlessbowl)
    You're not a chemist by any chance are you?
    Physicist actually, but I do find that most chemists share the exact same opinion.
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    (Original post by mattbroon)
    Im not going to lie - yes it is.
    Fair enough, then. At least you're being honest towards yourself about your motivations.
    Are you sure you'll want to go ahead with medicine if your Oxbridge/LSE application is unsuccessful, though? It's an awfully long degree to be doing if you're not really 100% convinced it's the subject you want to do...:dontknow:
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Fair enough, then. At least you're being honest towards yourself about your motivations.
    Are you sure you'll want to go ahead with medicine if your Oxbridge/LSE application is unsuccessful, though? It's an awfully long degree to be doing if you're not really 100% convinced it's the subject you want to do...:dontknow:
    I know, im just so confused right now. I have unconditional for medicine, but if my alevels are bad next month then i am basically stuck there.

    I really want to make alot of money when i am older, but i am also interested in helping people, meanwhile i also care greatly about economics.
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    (Original post by Audrey Hepburn)
    Well all I'm going on for my bases for how good the courses are at each university are people on them, and unfortunately I only know one person at lse (also I know absolutely nothing about cambridge). The economics part of everyone at oxford's courses seem to be a bit less rigorous than that of lse from what I've been told (when comparing what they knew the person at lse seemed to know a hell of a lot more), but as I said this is one person and so obviously cannot be taken as a representation of everyone. .
    That's the thing. Not that I expect you to (although you should really, given your making such mis-informed statements about the courses), really look at the course details. Here at LSE for example, we don't start learning quant maths to the degree of Oxford's E&M, until our second year, where as at Oxford its taught in the first - my point being that each of the courses are on a broad basis, the same in teaching, but where they differ tends to be the slight focus they have; in the case of Oxford for example in quant, Cambridge macro and here at LSE developmental/enviromental et al. Also, I believe Oxford's E&M course has the most choices in terms of which modules you can pick, although I am pretty happy with the somewhat limited choice here at LSE (as they suit my interests).

    I realise that oxford is placed higher in the league tables for economics than lse but I refuse to judge based on this as they also place oxford higher than imperial for physics, something which I know to be an absolute load of crap.
    I don't believe in league tables either; they are rather dubious imo. As I said in my original post however, the tri-partite institutions (i.e. Oxford, LSE and Cambridge) are really regarded as the same at undergraduate level anyway - one must remember, even at undergraduate level, the degrees taught are not really specific/heavily in-depth (for good reason of course).

    Going back to stuff about oxford life, I'm glad your friends have enjoyed their time but myself and the majority of the people that I hang around with found that the whole 'prestigious' ideal of oxford became somewhat less bright when we found ourselves drowning in work and being metaphorically whipped by numerous tutors who don't register the need for time outside academics in a city with only one halfway decent club. But again, obviously I can't speak for everyone or even most people as I only know a small fraction of the university.
    Indeed I gather Oxbridge life is tough; I have this from numerous of my Law friends there as being particulalry bad! Nonetheless, none said they would substitute it for another university experience if they had the chance too. Further, given the honestly lack of tutor contact here at LSE (virtually none) or tradition/prestigue etc as with Oxbridge, even with the work, you lot have it lucky :p:
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    (Original post by Alan.Stanford2009)
    That's the thing. Not that I expect you to (although you should really, given your making such mis-informed statements about the courses), really look at the course details. Here at LSE for example, we don't start learning quant maths to the degree of Oxford's E&M, until our second year, where as at Oxford its taught in the first - my point being that each of the courses are on a broad basis, the same in teaching, but where they differ tends to be the slight focus they have; in the case of Oxford for example in quant, Cambridge macro and here at LSE developmental/enviromental et al. Also, I believe Oxford's E&M course has the most choices in terms of which modules you can pick, although I am pretty happy with the somewhat limited choice here at LSE (as they suit my interests).

    I don't believe in league tables either; they are rather dubious imo. As I said in my original post however, the tri-partite institutions (i.e. Oxford, LSE and Cambridge) are really regarded as the same at undergraduate level anyway - one must remember, even at undergraduate level, the degrees taught are not really specific/heavily in-depth (for good reason of course).
    So basically the courses are about the same, one only being made better than the other by a person's particular preference for one method of teaching (or breadth of course) over another. Fair enough, so assuming you're not incredibly wealthy it probably wouldn't be worth screwing up your student finance in order to change.

    Indeed I gather Oxbridge life is tough; I have this from numerous of my Law friends there as being particulalry bad! Nonetheless, none said they would substitute it for another university experience if they had the chance too. Further, given the honestly lack of tutor contact here at LSE (virtually none) or tradition/prestigue etc as with Oxbridge, even with the work, you lot have it lucky :p:
    I suppose it depends on how high you place the importance of all that stuff in your own mind, for you it must be much higher than for myself. I'm afraid it looks like we must agree to disagree on the value of it
 
 
 
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