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    I'm going to 6th Form in September and hope (well, it's pretty damn certain) to study maths, physics, chemistry and geology. Each of these subjects is taught for just under 5 hours per week, leaving the equivalent of an extra day for free periods and the general studies course (which may or may not be mandatory; I am yet to find out).

    The thing is that I studied German at GCSE and got on pretty well with it (I'm hoping for an A* on August 27th ) and I really do not want to completely halt my German studies. The reason this was not included in my 4 choices, however, is that I want to do a Geophysics degree, and I think they can be pretty competitive if you want to go to a decent Uni on a decent course (like an Msci with a year abroad or something). Having all science/maths based subjects also leaves me standing fairly well if I change my mind and go for engineering or something.

    So would you recommend dropping general studies in favour of a German AS? I don't want to sound up myself at all, but I coped with GCSE German extremely well and feel I can "think" in the language, in terms of grammar/word order (vocabulary is limited to what you learn at GCSE plus what I've picked up elsewhere), and for AS, my potential teacher said that it was mostly going to be grammar anyway (no doubt tenses mainly, but she also mentioned the Dativ case etc., which I'm fairly familiar with). I think I could cope with the course easily; for AS at least, but would you recommend taking it as a 5th AS level?
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    If you think you can cope yeah. I wouldn't however underestimate the step up from GCSE to A level in languages. I got an A* in Spanish at GCSE yet have found it really hard this year. I know German AS level grammar is quite hard from what my friends say, but if you're fairly familiar with Dativ then you may find it a bit easier. I think you'll have to find out for yourself how hard it is, no matter what anyone says though. If you don't like it you can drop it and just carry on outside of school.
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    Geophysics, would you not need Geography or anything considering it's Geo[physics?
    I have no clue just a thought
    About the extra German As Level, just ask your school on enrollment day - mines the same day i get my GCSE's.
    It could turn out your school does not do German as an AS-Level course/will not pay for your exam.
    At my school i know if you take 5 AS-Levels you don't have to do Critical Thinking/General Studies/Citizenship, however if you only do 4 AS's it's mandatory.
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    No, a language would not be too much to cope with, as all your other subjects are sciences and have next to no workload as such.

    However, you mentioned wanting to do geophysics. You also mentioned that you chose all sciences so that you could do into other science-related areas, such as engineering.
    It would probably (research this more) be better for you to take further maths, either as a 5th, or instead of geology. The general rule of thumb for any degree that is predominantly maths or physics, is to have maths, further maths and physics.

    Also, bear in mind that to go into geophysics, doesn't mean you need to take a geophysics degree.

    For example, natural sciences courses begin broad, and you have to study some chemistry, physics, maths and even biology sometimes. As you progress, you begin to specialise, and geophysics (or similar) will be an option in one of the later years.

    Basically, if you're looking to do anything to do with maths or physics at a top university, it would really be to your advantage to take further maths.
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    Maths and Physics are certainly the important ones here, and geology is a good one also. I'd say the four you have are pretty good, and if you want to do the german then go for it. If it is too hard then like someone else said you can always drop it and continue it outside of college.
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    (Original post by Troubled_Student)
    Geophysics, would you not need Geography or anything considering it's Geo[physics?
    Not really. The only requirements are maths and physics (some take offers with chemistry as well). No doubt geography would help, but I didn't take geography for GCSE and you need at least a C in geography or environmental science to do as at my college. Besides, geology is more readily accepted anyway.

    (Original post by AnonyMatt)
    It would probably (research this more) be better for you to take further maths.

    As you progress, you begin to specialise, and geophysics (or similar) will be an option in one of the later years.
    I've toyed with the idea of further maths, but I really don't know if I could handle it, and I don't really want to gamble. I did move up to be targeted for an A* in maths, but even then, it'll be a close shave (if I do get it) and I've heard that further maths is quite intensive. It's looked favourably upon, I know, is not essential by any means and is (apparently) as useful as geology for this. Besides, further maths doesn't give me the chance to go to Berlin , and I have the opportunity at my 6th Form to do it as an AS in my A level year, if I want.
    As for specialising as a later part of a broader degree, what would you recommend? I'm not sure exactly what line of work I want, but I'm interested in the earth and its processes and would like to work with glaciers in the Arctic or something else with travelling involved. Is going straight in for a geophysics degree the best way of doing that? (Engineering etc. are really only fall back plans; if I mess up physics, for example, I'd still be an alright candidate for chemical engineering if everything else was good.

    Just to be absolutely clear, general studies is worthless and is not helpful at all for getting in, right?
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    (Original post by Unvincibledudeman)
    I've toyed with the idea of further maths, but I really don't know if I could handle it, and I don't really want to gamble. I did move up to be targeted for an A* in maths, but even then, it'll be a close shave (if I do get it) and I've heard that further maths is quite intensive. It's looked favourably upon, I know, is not essential by any means and is (apparently) as useful as geology for this. Besides, further maths doesn't give me the chance to go to Berlin , and I have the opportunity at my 6th Form to do it as an AS in my A level year, if I want.
    As for specialising as a later part of a broader degree, what would you recommend? I'm not sure exactly what line of work I want, but I'm interested in the earth and its processes and would like to work with glaciers in the Arctic or something else with travelling involved. Is going straight in for a geophysics degree the best way of doing that? (Engineering etc. are really only fall back plans; if I mess up physics, for example, I'd still be an alright candidate for chemical engineering if everything else was good.

    Just to be absolutely clear, general studies is worthless and is not helpful at all for getting in, right?
    Have you looked at a straight geology degree? That would be good for studying earth processes. Just an extra thought for your head

    And yes, for any science (any I've seen anyway), general studies is useless.
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    (Original post by Unvincibledudeman)
    I've toyed with the idea of further maths, but I really don't know if I could handle it, and I don't really want to gamble. I did move up to be targeted for an A* in maths, but even then, it'll be a close shave (if I do get it) and I've heard that further maths is quite intensive. It's looked favourably upon, I know, is not essential by any means and is (apparently) as useful as geology for this. Besides, further maths doesn't give me the chance to go to Berlin , and I have the opportunity at my 6th Form to do it as an AS in my A level year, if I want.
    As for specialising as a later part of a broader degree, what would you recommend? I'm not sure exactly what line of work I want, but I'm interested in the earth and its processes and would like to work with glaciers in the Arctic or something else with travelling involved. Is going straight in for a geophysics degree the best way of doing that? (Engineering etc. are really only fall back plans; if I mess up physics, for example, I'd still be an alright candidate for chemical engineering if everything else was good.

    Just to be absolutely clear, general studies is worthless and is not helpful at all for getting in, right?
    Well, to be honest, I thought physics was easier to get into than engineering, but whatever...

    I can't advise you on your degree. You don't need to think about it yet. I was just enlightening you with regards to degrees with titles that don't explicitly state geophysics.

    For the sake of admissions, and also workload in the second year, don't you think it would be better to do further maths in the first year instead?

    It's not as hard as it's made out to be. It's just that, in comparison, maths is easy.
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    (Original post by AnonyMatt)
    Well, to be honest, I thought physics was easier to get into than engineering, but whatever...

    I can't advise you on your degree. You don't need to think about it yet. I was just enlightening you with regards to degrees with titles that don't explicitly state geophysics.

    For the sake of admissions, and also workload in the second year, don't you think it would be better to do further maths in the first year instead?

    It's not as hard as it's made out to be. It's just that, in comparison, maths is easy.
    Well maybe not engineering, but there are a lot of doors left open if I manage to mess one of my subjects up.
    It would be better to do further maths in the first year, but since it's not necessary and since I'd be lucky to do well in it, I'd rather do a language. Rather than learning extra information, I've been told the first part (6 months or so) of AS German is mostly revision as long as your grammar is fine. Really, I just don't want to waste time with general studies, but want something I feel I will do well in and further maths is uncharted territory and somewhat dangerous as far as I'm concerned.
 
 
 
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