Is classical music for the middle/upper classes?

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ak56
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#61
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#61
(Original post by love.to.love.you.)
'Good on you'? I don't need a pat on the back for being cultured tbh..
Yes you do, you're a working class yobo at heart, but good on you for fighting it.
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Sir_Vile_Minds
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#62
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#62
Got brought up on rock and pop music and later into metal but I love classical.

Oh, and I'm total working class, bruv.
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FormerlyHistoryStudent
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#63
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#63
I don't see how people can dismiss it is boring. Some of it is incredibly exciting and powerful- the last movement of Beethoven's 5th, for example - some are very fast-paced, and other pieces, although slower, are so beautiful that I personally could never just have it on as 'background' music, I always have to listen to it properly.

People have an image of it as dull and boring, when in fact there is an incredible variety of styles - exciting, fast, playful, romantic, mournful, soul-stirring, rousing, modern, atmospheric (eg. Danse Macabre by Saint-Saens, 'Hoedown' in the Rodeo Series by Copland), tender, tear-jerkingly sad, beautiful, or combinations of these...
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TheSownRose
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#64
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#64
I was born in east London to a telephone engineer father and mother ... and I love classical music, listen to a mix of baroque and rock music.
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Antoniaerika
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#65
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It depends where you live If you live in Italy, children on the farms and in the villages from the age of 4 sing/hum classical. Pavarotti came from such a village and so did their great composers. zThe British are too stiff lipped to go around singing to the shops and to school
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imlikeahermit
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#66
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The lower lower working classes barely know how to act in public, never mind listen to classical music.
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UnclePete
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#67
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(Original post by MadMatt)
Hi, I live in London and as such I come across all sorts of backgrounds and classes and whatnot. It always strikes me that less affluent people NEVER listen to classical music, and when I suggest it to them they laugh it off as some sort of foreign concept.

Is there a reason why it tends to be the educated/affluent/culltured peolpe that like classical music?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-LK-...ture=rec-HM-r2

How can you not like those masterpieces!?!?
I think it is hard to generalise. I myself come from a skilled working class background, my father was a master carpenter and joiner, my mother a ledger clark but both installed in us a liking of good music which persists to this day.
At around thirteen -fourteen I learnt the flute under the tutelage of a former army and civilian concert musician who in his day had been a solo flute and clarinet player in the Royal Artillery band, then seventy or so strong, latterly going on to the Grenadier Guards Band, both music ensembles of world renowned repute. How many know that the RA band, sadly under the defence cuts in recent years no longer, had Britain's oldest and first established professional orchestra ?

I often listen to Classic FM going to and from work. My soft spot for brass and military band music came from my late father ( ever met a Yorkshireman who doesn't like brass bands? ! ) as he used to take me up to Chelsea barracks to walk along side one of the Guards bands who in those days would play all the way up Ebury Street and past Victoria station to the palace for guard changing and often back again. Oh what a sound....one of the best free music shows in town, again no more. My mother, however prefered to spend her time visiting her aunt in Bayswater !

Although put on hold because of the pandemic, there are superb recitals held in the Guards Chapel in Birdcage Walk once a month for around fifty minutes. Entry is free, with a voluntary retiring collection for service charities afterwards. Just turn up around ten to one and enjoy.
They are overarched by Dr. Rachel Smith, principal flute player of the Coldstream Gds. Band and concentrate mainly on classical pieces with plenty of solo playing.

Now to the dreaded class thing: I have noticed certainly in recent years talking to some of the musicians I know in the Household Division Bands that many of them are from decidedly middle class backgrounds, especially woodwind players. I attribute a lot of this, and correct me if wrong, to the fact that unlike private and independent ones many state schools have cut back on both instrumental and music tuition making it difficult to nurture a child's interest especially if they are from a poorer background. An exception to this and probably because then in Hong Kong music tuition was still strong in state schools is David Wong, who from a very poor disadvantaged background through hard work and ability is now principal clarinetist of the Grenadier Gds. Band.
Comments welcome.


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