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Think.. What Do You Really Think And Feel About Women Wearing Hijabs?? Watch

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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    Almost everyone who comments on this does not understand it. Firstly, it has nothing to do with Islam, which only specifies 'modest dress', not headscarves. Its modern prevalence began in the 1970s as part of the Ultra-Conservative movements in Iran and Saudi Arabia. Essentially, it's a political object, not a religious one. As much as I find it a distasteful choice for women to make, effectively subjugating themselves by submitting to the male chauvinism of Islamic conservatism, I still would not go so far as banning its wear. That isn't the place of the British state.
    Best answer so far, totally agree.
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    Let me tell you that the whole face covering burka wearing women are only a very small proportion of the Muslim population in fact most Muslims don't agree with it ........
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Well as I said, I don't personally know what all their laws are. I'm not going to outright say I condemn it - who knows, maybe they have a good reason? Like I said, it's their business.
    What could possibly be a good enough reason to ban women from driving? It's quite clearly a vindication of female rights, and "equality".
    I would condemn it because Muhammad condemned it.
    (I assume you're talking about forced circumcision, rather than what women do to themselves of their own accord?)
    So if Muhammad said it was morally just to rape young children would you do so? Religious people just blindly follow what a book tells you too without seeing the bigger picture. Why don't you develop your own personal values instead of shoving the responsibility upon something that can't even be proven.

    I'm genuinely interested, sorry if this sounds like an attack, but I'm quite clearly an atheist, especially when it violates basic human rights and the struggle for equality and harmony.
    For example, women who have young children aren't put in prison, or subject to the death penalty. Instead, they are confined to their own homes for crimes they commit.
    That's disgusting. How is that even a crime? Do you believe it is because your book probably tells you it is? Do you also condemn homosexuals for the "vile" sins they commit? Are you repulsed by them? Do you agree with sentencing homosexuals to the death penalty in many Islamic states because your book tells you homosexuality is wrong? (I question I have yet to get anwer of muslims on this board).

    Religion is ******* vile. I would fight till death to see the world secular, I really would.
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    (Original post by 35mm_)
    What could possibly be a good enough reason to ban women from driving? It's quite clearly a vindication of female rights, and "equality".
    I don't know what could be a good reason to ban women from driving, but the Saudi government seems to think they have a reason.

    People from different countries are different, and they are used to different social and cultural things. I don't think that all laws can be uniform in all places.

    If women were banned from driving here, then I' say it was definitely a vindication of human rights. But I'm not going to comment on what Saudi Arabia are doing, because I don't know why they're doing it.

    So if Muhammad said it was morally just to rape young children would you do so? Religious people just blindly follow what a book tells you too without seeing the bigger picture. Why don't you develop your own personal values instead of shoving the responsibility upon something that can't even be proven.

    I'm genuinely interested, sorry if this sounds like an attack, but I'm quite clearly an atheist, especially when it violates basic human rights and the struggle for equality and harmony.
    No - if he said that, then I'd know there was something wrong.
    But when he says good things, then of course I'm going to agree with them.

    That's disgusting. How is that even a crime? Do you believe it is because your book probably tells you it is? Do you also condemn homosexuals for the "vile" sins they commit? Are you repulsed by them? Do you agree with sentencing homosexuals to the death penalty in many Islamic states because your book tells you homosexuality is wrong? (I question I have yet to get anwer of muslims on this board).
    How is what even a crime?
    I don't see how this is related to anything that I said

    No, I don't agree with sentencing homosexuals to death - the Qur'an doesn't ask us to kill homosexuals. It simply tells people not to engage in homosexual acts.

    I'm no more repulsed by a homosexual person than I am by a person who drinks alcohol, or doesn't give at least 2.5% of their wealth to charity
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I don't know what could be a good reason to ban women from driving, but the Saudi government seems to think they have a reason.

    People from different countries are different, and they are used to different social and cultural things. I don't think that all laws can be uniform in all places.
    Culture isn't an excuse. I hate when people use culture to permit horrid actions and vindications of human rights.
    No - if he said that, then I'd know there was something wrong.
    But when he says good things, then of course I'm going to agree with them.
    But you believe He is all high and mighty ultimately means that you're automatically believe everything He says is good, yes? That means if you had grown up reading the Qu'ran and it said raping young children is morally just then you would believe so, because the book dictates your life.
    How is what even a crime?
    I don't see how this is related to anything that I said
    Women having young children and being forced to stay inside. Or did I read your post wrong?
    No, I don't agree with sentencing homosexuals to death - the Qur'an doesn't ask us to kill homosexuals. It simply tells people not to engage in homosexual acts.

    I'm no more repulsed by a homosexual person than I am by a person who drinks alcohol, or doesn't give at least 2.5% of their wealth to charity
    But most Islamic countries sentence homosexuals to death, that is, whether you like it or not, a reflection on your religion as a whole and the culture it promotes.
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    I HATE the principle behind it, but I don't have any preconceptions about the women who do wear it.
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    (Original post by 35mm_)
    Culture isn't an excuse. I hate when people use culture to permit horrid actions and vindications of human rights.
    Well the culture may render a particular action to be a non-violation of human rights.

    For example, here, if some teenage youths are wearing hoods over their heads, it may indicate that they're trying to hide their identity and cause trouble.
    Whereas in Saudi Arabia, if some women are covering their heads, it means nothing of the sort.

    As a result, here, police have the right to ask people to remove their hoods and randomly search them, and disperse them if they are gathered in large groups. But in Saudi Arabia, the same law does not apply to women who cover their heads.

    Different people from different backgrounds require different laws. I can't comment on the Saudi Laws, because I don't know the reasoning behind their implementation.

    But you believe He is all high and mighty ultimately means that you're automatically believe everything He says is good, yes? That means if you had grown up reading the Qu'ran and it said raping young children is morally just then you would believe so, because the book dictates your life.
    It goes the other way round. You're supposed to notice that the Qur'an says good things. You're supposed to notice that the Qur'an has thought of laws which you wouldn't have thought of yourself, and has some good reasoning behind it.

    Only after you've decided that the Qur'an is more wise than yourself, do you allow it to dictate yor life.

    If the Qur'an said that we must rape young children, and I could not see any good reason for this, then I woud think that I am wiser than the Qur'an, and as such, I would not allow it to dictate my life.



    Women having young children and being forced to stay inside. Or did I read your post wrong?
    I think you read my post wrong.

    In Saudi Arabia, people who commit crimes may be locked in jail, or executed, depending on the crime.
    However, a woman with young children is immune to both of these punishments. If she commits a crime, she will be locked in her own house rather than in prison.

    But most Islamic countries sentence homosexuals to death, that is, whether you like it or not, a reflection on your religion as a whole and the culture it promotes.
    That may be the case, but it isn't going to make me dislike Islam at all for it, because I know that Islam isn't commanding such behaviour.
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    (Original post by EskimoJo)
    Off topic, but wanted to ask a Muslim without starting a new thread, but is it possible to be a legitimate Muslim if you only consider the Quran to be a Holy book and only obey instructions laid out in there?
    Is it only the Quran that's the unaltered, direct word of Allah?
    CORRECT!
    The quran is the word of god and should you agree with everything in there then you are muslim, providing you have formally converted too.
    However their are other islamic sources of similar relevance to the quran, these are 'hadiths' and 'Al-agida'

    Thanks for eveyone's comments
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    I really don't get why people would have a problem with the hijab. Unlike things that cover the entire face, it doesn't make communication more difficult. I don't think I really even notice people wearing headscarves because it's just normal. It's not even really a foreign thing since similar headscarves used to be worn quite commonly in this country, they're just not in fashion at the moment. The Queen wears one some times.
    this what the difference between us wearing baseball caps (Chav culture) and them wearing a headscarf. If anyone has noticed it an up and coming trend to wear a bandanna covering a womans hair how is that different to an islamic woman covering her hair just for a different reason.

    Fashion or religion

    In fashion 2008/2009 http://www.fabsugar.co.uk/1792511



    The queen



    Also in some churches particularily in Rome it is a requirement that you cover your head
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    (Original post by brokenangel)
    this what the difference between us wearing baseball caps (Chav culture) and them wearing a headscarf. If anyone has noticed it an up and coming trend to wear a bandanna covering a womans hair how is that different to an islamic woman covering her hair just for a different reason.
    I don't think anyone has expressed a dislike of the headscarf purely because of the garment itself. It's about what it represents and says about a person.
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    I don't mind the hijab as long as it's 100% their own choice and they haven't been forced into it in any way. Although I still find it a little odd.

    That said, in Manchester yesterday I saw a little girl who must have been about two years old in a pushchair wearing a hijab. And that is just wrong.
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    I hate it - it's an insult to British society.

    I wouldn't let my girlfriend walk around Saudi Arabia half naked - well the coin flips both ways.

    As another poster said - it's not the item itself; it's why it's worn.

    It's a very loaded statement and one I personally find deeply unwelcome.

    If Muslims want to live in the UK they should respect British culture first.
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    On a personal level I disagree with it - but it is not the place of the government to control what people should and should not be wearing. We're already going down a slippery slope to having more and more aspects of our lives dictated by the government without extending its scope to clothing.

    I hope that given more time living in this liberal (compared to Pakistan, Saudi Arabia etc) society, the more misoginist aspects of Islamic traditions will be abandoned out of choice, and the muslims of the UK will embrace true islamic culture based on the Koran and not on the self-interest and misinterpretation of a loud minority.
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    I don't mind the hijab [covering of the hair] - after all, we allow people to wear hats.

    However, I do oppose the wearing of the burka. It's incredibly anti-social.
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    Wearing of hijab at a young age is not neccesary, but when you get to certain age e.g. 18 I'm sure they have to wear it. Burkha I don't really like it because it is not compulsory in islam only those who are ultra-religious and adhere to old man's taste would choose to wear it. Burkha is really an oudated fashion in the muslim world.
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    (Original post by CandyFlipper)
    On a personal level I disagree with it - but it is not the place of the government to control what people should and should not be wearing. We're already going down a slippery slope to having more and more aspects of our lives dictated by the government without extending its scope to clothing.

    I hope that given more time living in this liberal (compared to Pakistan, Saudi Arabia etc) society, the more misoginist aspects of Islamic traditions will be abandoned out of choice, and the muslims of the UK will embrace true islamic culture based on the Koran and not on the self-interest and misinterpretation of a loud minority.
    Correct! I hope they do because most of the things they bring out is really not in the koran( 'they' I'm talking abut the old people).
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    (Original post by Rule Britannia)
    I hate it - it's an insult to British society.

    I wouldn't let my girlfriend walk around Saudi Arabia half naked - well the coin flips both ways.

    As another poster said - it's not the item itself; it's why it's worn.

    It's a very loaded statement and one I personally find deeply unwelcome.

    If Muslims want to live in the UK they should respect British culture first.
    You wouldn't want any arab's girldfriend to run around naked in the Uk would you? but I agree on some things the saudi arabia can sometimes be a hypocrite. At least when u go to dubai u can wear anything u want as long as it doesn't show any indecency. "Rule Britannia" code geasss
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    why are people comparing Britain with saudi and associating Islam so storngly with such a dictative leadership ?

    it's a bit like saying HEY GRAND DRAGON OF THE KKK! What are you're views on every non-white person? And how do you think the world should be lead?

    It's absurd
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    i agree, i think its ridiculous to compare britain to saudi arabia... thats an extreme! Why would the wearing of hijab be offensive to you? surely its up to oneself to choose whether they want to show their hair to you or whoever else if they wanted to!!! just get over it! ITS THEIR CHOICE NOT YOURS so if u dont like it then close ur eyes for goodness sake! :mad: (btw in Islam women are advised to wear it once they hit puberty)
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    Is anyone else scared like I am when one stands near you? Especially if they have a bag with them.
    Overall its different, but its not a hen.
 
 
 
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