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    Hello

    Next year i will be completing a BSc in physics from the university of manchester (hopefully with a first). I would like to get into a carreer in engineering and was thinking of doing a masters in mechanical engineering, but im not sure if physics is a "relevent subject" (as stated in the entrance requirements).

    Does anyone have any advice as to how to do engineering with a BSc in physics?

    I was told it would be very easy to do engineering after a physics degree when i started. I find there is little information on it now though, like many things i was told at school, i think this was a bit of a lie.

    Thanks for any info

    edit - oh, and i would prefer not to spend the next 3/4/5 years in university
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    Well sounds like you have a good start. Check out the places where you want to apply you may also be able to get funded especially with a first.

    Regarding the revelency of a physics degree I would think it would be acceptable but all you have to do is check the Engineering Staff register at the university of choice for the postgrad addmisiions tutor and send a email outlining you degree expected grades and whether you can do the subject.

    I think that you wont have a problem but it depends where you apply as at postgrad level there is never a concensus on what is "acceptable per se"

    Hope it helps
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    thanks alot, i think i will proably go ringing/emailing universities and see what they say about the relevent subjects thing. If you think doing a masters would be the right course of action for a career.

    I was wondering if there was any kind of graduate schemes where i could learn while i was working, maybe a year in industry would be a good idea...
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    I know the oil industry does schemes like what you say except they usually want a masters before hand. Atkins also usually want a masters.

    Check out websites is my advise again. But it seems a masters is minimum into some science specific displines at the moment but that may not included engineering
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    After some looking into it i found that a taught post-graduate masters degree is actually a M-Sc not a M-Eng so i will have a masters in science. Therefore is there any point in me doing it? M-Eng is required to become a chartered engineer and alot of jobs i saw say they require MEng maybe BEng and MSc. Not MSc.
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    This is a rather convoluted system... I made an error in my last post:

    The Master of Science degree should not be confused with the more recent MSci, or Master in Science degree, now offered by UK institutions.
    (Thanks wikipedia)

    what a mistake! i would have a masters OF science not IN science.
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    The Institute of Physics is licenced by the Engineering Council to award CEng to physicists working in an engineering field (many do) and so it is not only possible to work in engineering as a physicist it is also possible to gain full professional recognition as an engineer. In order to do this you would need a masters-equivalent standard of education or experience (MPhys, MSci, MSc or equivalent experience in industry) to begin the chartership process. An appropriate MSc would be considered sufficient to achieve this of course.
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    A career in engineering is definitely possible with a Physics degree. There maybe certain engineering specialisms in which you might struggle to enter but there are so many areas of work you are bound to find one that suits your interest and background.
 
 
 

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