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    My BP is 80 over 40 or something there about. is that a problem?
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    What the hell?! :lolwut: Do you faint a lot?
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    That is generally considered low, but unless you are fainting or having problems its all good, reduces risks of CHD, which is ALWAYS good
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    That's low. Salt will make it higher but then, eating lots of salt is not recommended.
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    i almost faint quite often...feel lightheaded and dizzy everytime i get up (lol thought this was normal for ages) partially lose vision for a few secs when I get up. is there any benefits from raising this to a moer acceptable numebr?
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    Pretty much all of the symptoms you just described will stop as they are all associated with low blood pressure. Blood pressure this low can be dangerous.
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    (Original post by david_man)
    My BP is 80 over 40 or something there about. is that a problem?

    does sound hypotensive, have you had any tests done? Is it chronic? Have you had it taken when sitting down and standing up?


    afaik, there isn't much doctors do about hypotension unless there is something causing that, ie shock, addisons disease, where as other countries like germany will give you medication to raise it :dontknow: not 100% sure tho
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    (Original post by david_man)
    i almost faint quite often...feel lightheaded and dizzy everytime i get up (lol thought this was normal for ages) partially lose vision for a few secs when I get up. is there any benefits from raising this to a moer acceptable numebr?

    when did you have it taken, and who took it?! Did they not say anything?!
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    (Original post by david_man)
    i almost faint quite often...feel lightheaded and dizzy everytime i get up (lol thought this was normal for ages) partially lose vision for a few secs when I get up. is there any benefits from raising this to a moer acceptable numebr?
    Me too (used to be embarrassing fainting unexpectedly)! Mine was very low lol but it has started to get alot better... Nd I hate salt! Nothin really bad about it thought, better than high!
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    when did you have it taken, and who took it?! Did they not say anything?!
    been in hospital for sports injuries etc and they take it like every hour and no they all say its fine...should I increse my salt intake or what?
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    (Original post by david_man)
    been in hospital for sports injuries etc and they take it like every hour and no they all say its fine...should I increse my salt intake or what?
    The most likely cause of your blackouts is a condition called postural hypotension (also known as orthostatic hypotension). When you move from lying down to standing up, your blood pressure drops very low, probably because your nervous system is a bit slow in telling your heart and blood vessels to work harder to counter the effects of gravity.

    When this happens, not enough blood reaches your brain, causing you to feel faint and collapse. This is usually harmless, though if you fall there's the risk that you may hurt yourself; older people sometimes break their bones this way.

    In the rest of Europe, low blood pressure is considered a medical problem no matter what age the person is; it's often linked to a variety of symptoms and is frequently treated with drugs. In the UK, however, we tend to think generally it's healthy to have a low blood pressure, so it's rarely treated, especially if the person is young and otherwise fit.



    You should definitely see your doctor about your blackouts because very occasionally there are other causes such as abnormal heart rhythms or epilepsy, although these are rare in young people.

    It's important your doctor checks your blood pressure when you're lying down and standing to make sure of the diagnosis, and then decides whether treatment would be appropriate for you (for example, if there is a real risk that you could fall and be injured).

    Beating postural hypotension

    * Get up very slowly: go from lying down to sitting to standing.


    * Make sure you have a healthy evening meal with plenty of carbohydrates to provide sustained energy release throughout the night. Waking up with a low blood-sugar level can aggravate hypotension and may be the actual cause of your blackouts.


    * Keep well hydrated by drinking at least 1.5 to 2 litres of water a day. Dehydration can aggravate low blood pressure.

    - good advice from dr macnair at the bbc
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    The most likely cause of your blackouts is a condition called postural hypotension (also known as orthostatic hypotension). When you move from lying down to standing up, your blood pressure drops very low, probably because your nervous system is a bit slow in telling your heart and blood vessels to work harder to counter the effects of gravity.

    When this happens, not enough blood reaches your brain, causing you to feel faint and collapse. This is usually harmless, though if you fall there's the risk that you may hurt yourself; older people sometimes break their bones this way.

    In the rest of Europe, low blood pressure is considered a medical problem no matter what age the person is; it's often linked to a variety of symptoms and is frequently treated with drugs. In the UK, however, we tend to think generally it's healthy to have a low blood pressure, so it's rarely treated, especially if the person is young and otherwise fit.



    You should definitely see your doctor about your blackouts because very occasionally there are other causes such as abnormal heart rhythms or epilepsy, although these are rare in young people.

    It's important your doctor checks your blood pressure when you're lying down and standing to make sure of the diagnosis, and then decides whether treatment would be appropriate for you (for example, if there is a real risk that you could fall and be injured).

    Beating postural hypotension

    * Get up very slowly: go from lying down to sitting to standing.


    * Make sure you have a healthy evening meal with plenty of carbohydrates to provide sustained energy release throughout the night. Waking up with a low blood-sugar level can aggravate hypotension and may be the actual cause of your blackouts.


    * Keep well hydrated by drinking at least 1.5 to 2 litres of water a day. Dehydration can aggravate low blood pressure.

    - good advice from dr macnair at the bbc
    I have pulmonary valve stenosis...this is probably related haha
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    The most likely cause of your blackouts is a condition called postural hypotension
    I have pulmonary valve stenosis...this is probably related haha
    Pwned.
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    If you stand on your head, you feel much dizzier. That's all I have found and want to know about my blood pressure being low. :P
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    The most likely cause of your blackouts is a condition called postural hypotension
    :curious:
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Pwned.
    ouch
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    (Original post by david_man)
    ouch
    Not directed at you mate, to Subcutaneous for her dangerous diagnosing.
 
 
 
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