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Differences between public and comprehensive schools Watch

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    (Original post by K the Failure)
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    Better facilities, more specialised facilities (we have a bursar and electric carts that our groundsmen can drive around in), and more opportunities to do. For instance, I went to a weekly water polo club for a while when I was in year 7 or something and I probably wouldn't have had the chance at a comprehensive. There is also access to loads of other sports that you wouldn't really play (golf, squash etc).

    Also, we were forced to do some sort of enrichment in year 9/10 such as CCF or helping old people or something. We also have form tutors like many other schools, but they take records of the clubs and societies you are a member of and the extra-curricular activites you do so that not everyone becomes an over-studious bookworm.

    The subjects we do are more varied and in depth IMO. We do subjects such as Latin and Classical Civilisations which I think can really broaden your skills. Also, the classes tend to be smaller, therefore allowing the teachers to give you more attention which allows them to adapt to your needs.

    In summary, private schools have the capability to teach you well as well as providing all these extra-curricular activities to make you a better-rounded person.

    However, not all comprehensives are bad. I have cousins who went to a comprehensive and ended up going to very prestigious universities. However, they did have that work-hard attitude to see themselves through.
    Hmm, the things you've listed sound pretty worth it, and I'd definately agree with what you're saying on it not being all comps that are below par. What's your opinion on pupils emerging from private and independant schools being more knowledgeable and wised up on world issues and political matters? Surely smaller class sizes and more ECs couldn't solely account for this? Or would you say that's a whole other matter to do with home upbringing?

    (Original post by Marsha2112)
    Because they do IGCSEs not "what is the danger of mobile phones" and "which of these statements about suncream demonstrates the risk outweighing the benefits".
    Sorry I don't know much about the IGCSEs, could you expand on what you're saying?
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    (Original post by Mr. Cool)
    Hmm, the things you've listed sound pretty worth it, and I'd definitely agree with what you're saying on it not being all comps that are below par. What's your opinion on pupils emerging from private and independant schools being more knowledgeable and wised up on world issues and political matters? Surely smaller class sizes and more ECs couldn't solely account for this? Or would you say that's a whole other matter to do with home upbringing?



    Sorry I don't know much about the IGCSEs, could you expand on what you're saying?
    Well, IGCSEs are supposed to be more difficult & traditional, whereas normal ones have been dumbed down so some subjects, mainly science, are a complete joke. Those examples of questions are actual exam questions, and in the first half of the course literally all the questions were along those lines.
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    (Original post by Mr. Cool)
    Hmm, the things you've listed sound pretty worth it, and I'd definitely agree with what you're saying on it not being all comps that are below par. What's your opinion on pupils emerging from private and independant schools being more knowledgeable and wised up on world issues and political matters? Surely smaller class sizes and more ECs couldn't solely account for this? Or would you say that's a whole other matter to do with home upbringing?
    In general, the parents of pupils of an independant school have professional jobs. This means that they are exposed to an educated-orientated environment. As I've mentioned before, there is less stigma on wanting to learn, so there is more freedom to discuss whatever you want. With my friends at school, I discuss things such as politics of Iran whereas with my friends who live near me (and go to the local comp) I discuss pretty much just games... and more games, not that I don't do that at school. This is just me, it could be the other way round depending the type of person you are and what your friends are like. I just think that private school kids are more liable to take an interest in current affairs.

    (Original post by Mr. Cool)
    Sorry I don't know much about the IGCSEs, could you expand on what you're saying?
    iGCSEs (international GCSEs) are supposed to be harder than regular ones (I'm not sure if they actually are but they're supposed to help bridge the gap between GCSE and A-level).
 
 
 
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