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Anyone fed up of getting ripped off by student loans because you're middle class? watch

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    Lots of people do fall victim to this system, the reality is there isn't enough money in teh public purse.

    Solution: Raise taxes and charge interest on student loans so that there's money available to finance the education of students for the future.

    Also cut out things like Trident and useless expenditure on prestige projects or doing up civil service offices, MPs expenses etc.
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    (Original post by Dionysus)
    £50,000 a year is well inside the top 10%. £58,000 is inside the top 5%. So yes, 50,000 is a very high salary.
    ****, I'm rich then.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    If your parents are earning over £30k and won't donate any to you, that seems to be a failing with them rather than the government. :yum:
    That is absurd!
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    I agree with you it seems wrong to assume peoples parents will pay when they might not want to/have too many debts etc to pay off to afford it despite their relatively high income. I disagree that you would actually be better off coming from a low income family, even ignoring the benefits of living in a nice area, going to a high achieving school, having family holidays etc; just the value of being socialised in a middle class way and having knowledge of how to achieve in education and the workplace is extremely valuable. Just try your best to get a part time job whilst you are at uni, keep working lots in the holidays, live frugally and if necessary sell your car.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    If your parents are earning over £30k and won't donate any to you, that seems to be a failing with them rather than the government. :yum:
    Why? I'd argue it is the Govts failing for presuming that they will just give me money. As many others have wrote, this ISN'T the case.

    By your logic, are parents unable to give the money failures to then? If not, why not? it is a simple role reversial. You are criticising my parents for not providing so surely we can criticise those who can't provide?
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    (Original post by sophyy)
    That is absurd!
    Why?
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    IMO everyone should get the same amount. This can be topped up with parents money or a job.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Whereas people from poorer families, who are often the laziest work dodgers you'll ever meet, not only get the full amount in their student loan but also get a **** ton of grants and bursaries - which don't have to be paid back.
    One cannot take your argument seriously if you make silly comments like that. Please refrain from doing so.
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    (Original post by recorta)
    Well, you see, the thing is that those people who were complaining were the people whose parents were PROVIDING the state support through tax. This is really the underlying issue. Middle-class parents are expected to pay for THEIR kids to go to uni because the government won't provide any support, and then they're expected to pay for other people's kids to go to via taxes.

    This isn't separate magical money the government are coming up with. This is MY money, and my parents' money, and we have a right to feel a little pi**ed when the government turns the other way when we might feel the pinch.
    What, and you think the working-classes don't pay tax? Wow, you really are a daft sod :rolleyes:

    Pampered and spoilt middle-class kids just don't get it, do they? Their parents may not give their kids all the money they want, but by Christ the vast majority of middle-class people get all the money they need from them. Do middle-class kids really think their parents would let their little darlings miss out on University if they had a way of meeting any costs? Of course not, they'd shower them with all the money they needed, or, in a lot of cases, wanted to get them through Uni. That's indisputable. Working-class parents simply can't afford to help their kids financially, even if they wanted to, so EMA and more state money is given to their kids, and rightly so. Nobody with potential should miss out on further education, and believe me, OP, if money for working kids was cut, then many of them (even smarter than their middle-class counterparts) would never realise that potential.

    So quit your moaning and get back to your life of comfort, money and ease.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    If your parents are earning over £30k and won't donate any to you, that seems to be a failing with them rather than the government. :yum:
    So using that logic, the students with a single parent are not entitled because their father or mother shouldn't have abandoned the family, right? A failing of the parents?

    No, I don't think that's fair at all on the student.
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    (Original post by Nick_000)
    Why? I'd argue it is the Govts failing for presuming that they will just give me money. As many others have wrote, this ISN'T the case.

    By your logic, are parents unable to give the money failures to then? If not, why not? it is a simple role reversial. You are criticising my parents for not providing so surely we can criticise those who can't provide?
    No, of course not. If you can't afford to feed yourself and you starve, no one can blame you. If you can afford to feed yourself and you starve, perhaps it's a different matter.
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    (Original post by crazyhelicopter)
    See in my world, loans would be related to how much your degree was worth to society.

    People who use their degrees to do medicine, law, teaching, paramedicing, nursing etc could get more than those who do film studies and other such degrees.

    While the argument here may have several flaws, it would mean that there was more money to go around, and that people with degrees wouldn't find that the only jobs they could get would be stacking shelves, thus making the job market more accessible to all

    - but that is kinda off topic and a very different argument
    I always thought it was wierd how nurses get paid through their course even though their course is shorter less intensive than medicine my flatmate who was a nurse spent her money on clothes and alcohol sigh.
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    (Original post by Nick_000)
    Secondly, no to everything you write. I do have a car. Unfortunately, its a £2,000 crud bucket that I paid for by myself. THis year, I have also paid for a £600 MOT, a £200 exhaust and around £400 in other repairs.
    If you could afford those repairs you're not exactly hard done by.

    (Original post by Nick_000)
    If I want money, I earn it. In my time, I have cleaned sick up in nightclub toilets, worked in a chocolate factory (not fun) and took a soul destroying job in a call centre to pay my way.
    Tell me - were the people working at those places quite honestly middle-class? I worked full-time in a call-centre for a year and a half, and I was one of the very few people there not actually having to support myself on their dismal wages. If it was anything like where I worked, many had to take high-interest loans and work anti-social overtime shifts just to feed their kids and pay ludicrous bank charges each month. Does that sound like Elysium to you?

    (Original post by Nick_000)
    Last summer I had 2 jobs, working around 40 hours a week.
    So, in other words, you worked full-time for a few months? Boo ******* hoo.

    (Original post by Nick_000)
    I wish they would hand over £20 notes but they don't
    I'm quite sure everyone does. Alas, some need them far more than others.

    (Original post by Nick_000)
    Thanks for presuming you know everything about me.
    Rather hypocritical coming from the person who just ranted at a working class person about all of the supposed benefits they receive from the government. Unless you've been sitting on JSA your whole life, which shouldn't really be synonymous with working class; believe me, it doesn't go much further than educational incentives.
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    (Original post by fatal)
    I must say I'm better off as a student than I am at home. Being at home for three months is killing me, I'm about £400 in the red because I have to pay rent through the summer in Glasgow as well as living expenses (food etc) at home because my mum can't afford to keep me. I know you aren't a bad person but I wish I had the security net of a father who earned £50,000+.
    I would also like to apologise if I came across as rude before. That was not my intention :hugs:
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    There's not really much you can do, so why complain. I used to think like this but at the end of the day I wouldn't swap the nice upbringing I've had in a middle class family for someone who's had to grow up on a council estate. We've had 18 years of living comfortably I don't see why asking us to stand on our own two feet for 3 or so years is a big deal
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    (Original post by Feral Beast)
    So using that logic, the students with a single parent are not entitled because their father or mother shouldn't have abandoned the family, right?

    No, I don't think that's fair at all..
    No. How does that follow?

    If they are in a poor financial situation, they should get funding (regardless of family set-up). If they are not, it is not as important to fund these people as those who are in a poor financial situation.
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    Personally no I don't feel aggrieved at this. The government has a finite amount to spend so rationing has to occur. I don't think the system is perfect, it doesn't count dependants which is an issue. Other than that no major issue with it.

    What does annoy me is when people then say you shouldn't be getting money from mummy and daddy post 18 and to do so makes you a spoilt brat who doesnt know the value of money (I do ta ). Because the system has been designed in such a way that they are meant to help, and if they don't it puts you in rather a difficult situation (esp for people like me who are doing med/other very demanding degrees where scope for a art time job is minimal and after 3rd year summers are really short).
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Why?
    well why dont your parents pay part of your uni fee?
    just because someone's parents earn over £30k does not mean they have the spare money to put into uni education.
    Surely your parents and my parents have the same 'obligation' as you are putting it down to to pay each of us through uni?
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    Its ******** anyway as its a government loan and you will be supporting yourself anyway.....they dock your wages ffs your background makes no difference to it.
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    (Original post by elsa_89)
    And people are happy having their taxes spent on subsidising optional higher education for other people's kids? I think grants should be scrapped to fund a scheme where students can borrow more money but receive no grant. That way the same degree will cost the same to a student from any background. That's fairness.
    That is exactly what you're proposing an increase to. Where do you think your loan money comes from?
 
 
 
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