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"Cardio will eat your muscles"??? watch

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    How true is this statement basicly :rolleyes:, and what exactly does it mean. Does it mean doing cardio will reduce muscle mass, without reducing strength, or will it reduce both?

    For someone like me who will soon be doing a lot of cardio, will it be impossible for me to put on muscle at the same time?
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    Basically, whilst doing cardio (more commonly low intensity long duration) cardio your body does 'eat' muscles for fuel whilst your doing it. Tis helpful to do resistance with cardio.

    http://www.buildingbodies.ca/Cardio/...cle-loss.shtml

    For a far more informed view!
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    Unfuelled high intensity I wouldnt do.

    Muscle is quite easily burned for fuel if necessary compared to fat.
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    Yes it will. Resistance training should be done with cardio to maintain muscle. Or if you want to burn fat, just don't do cardio. I only do cardio when i'm actually gaining, that way minimal muscle lost.
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    (Original post by mipegg)
    Basically, whilst doing cardio (more commonly low intensity long duration) cardio your body does 'eat' muscles for fuel whilst your doing it. Tis helpful to do resistance with cardio.

    http://www.buildingbodies.ca/Cardio/...cle-loss.shtml

    For a far more informed view!
    Useful link
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    Yer unfueled it does. your body requires energy to move right? so it uses food most commonly stored as glycogen/fat stores. as a result these are burnt down.

    after a while glycogen runs out as its limited, so it shifts to mostly fat, as theres obviously a lot more of it.

    as the fat starts to go down, your body starts to eat muscle, and break it down to energy. thisis when you start hitting your body hard, and typically starts happening on things like marathons (why marathons take weeks to recover, and generally damage your body rather than enhance it, why you can't train for a marathon by doing a marathon).

    heres a good example of the results of inadequate fueling for very long duration low intensity exercise:



    btw the event is an ironman.
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    That vids also just for quality entertainment.
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    random question from someone fairly ignorant towards how to get fit-

    i'm swimming twice a week in order to get fit and tone, swimming from 1.5 to 2.5 km twice a week (have been doing it for 3 weeks, i hope to increase this), mixture of breaststroke and front crawl and sometimes only using my legs with a float.

    is this a good idea for toning my body,

    or is it like you say going to eat my muscles, surely the resistance from the water should build muscle, i particularly feel it in my upper arms

    also doing pressups, sit ups squats and crunches at home, really dont want the added cost of joining the gym
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    Swimming is good, it's far more resistive. Just make sure you aren't doing it on an empty stomach.
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    (Original post by paella)
    How true is this statement basicly :rolleyes:, and what exactly does it mean. Does it mean doing cardio will reduce muscle mass, without reducing strength, or will it reduce both?

    For someone like me who will soon be doing a lot of cardio, will it be impossible for me to put on muscle at the same time?
    If you back up your cardio regime with a decent diet you shouldn't lose muscle. However excessive cardio does have a negative effect on strength and power generation.

    To build muscle you need a surplus of energy to synthesise new muscle tissue. The more calories you burn (eg; through exercise), the more you need to eat to create this surplus. This can make muscle gain difficult.

    The volume of training can increase your risk of overtraining and also make recovery between resistance training sessions more difficult (inhibiting your progress).

    (Original post by Andy_ryan)
    or is it like you say going to eat my muscles, surely the resistance from the water should build muscle, i particularly feel it in my upper arms
    Cardio offers very little resistance to your muscles which offers little or no muscle gain.

    Look at marathon runners, swimmers, etc, are they extremely muscular? No, they're relatively small and weak. What about powerlifters, bodybuilders, strongmen, etc, they're muscular and strong, how do they do it? They lift heavy weights.
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    (Original post by yoshifumu)
    er unfueled it does. your body requires energy to move right? so it uses food most commonly stored as glycogen/fat stores. as a result these are burnt down.

    after a while glycogen runs out as its limited, so it shifts to mostly fat, as theres obviously a lot more of it.

    as the fat starts to go down, your body starts to eat muscle, and break it down to energy. thisis when you start hitting your body hard, and typically starts happening on things like marathons (why marathons take weeks to recover, and generally damage your body rather than enhance it, why you can't train for a marathon by doing a marathon).
    So, your body will only burn muscle if there isn't a surplus of fat? So for me, who is pretty fat doing an hours cardio a day shouldn't do my muscles and harm, especially as I'm doing weights and eating the right things.
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    (Original post by paella)
    So, your body will only burn muscle if there isn't a surplus of fat?
    Not really. The human body is very lazy. It is easier to break down muscle for energy than it is to break down fat, and so it will take the easier option when it's looking for fuel.

    It's one of the reasons that you never see regular marathon runners with any kind of decent muscle on them.
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    **** cardio.
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    (Original post by Andy_ryan)
    also doing pressups, sit ups squats and crunches at home, really dont want the added cost of joining the gym
    You'd be better off buying some freeweights (which last for years and don't cost too much) and doing some exercises with them.
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    situps and crunches really do nothing. At any rate its probably good they do nothing because most crunch monkies do nothing to try balance their core out (no back or oblique work)
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    (Original post by Gazcobain)
    Not really. The human body is very lazy. It is easier to break down muscle for energy than it is to break down fat, and so it will take the easier option when it's looking for fuel.

    It's one of the reasons that you never see regular marathon runners with any kind of decent muscle on them.
    this, my version was more run down 'cba to do the science' kinda explanation.

    although i didn't know muscle was easier to break down.
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    (Original post by yoshifumu)
    this, my version was more run down 'cba to do the science' kinda explanation.

    although i didn't know muscle was easier to break down.
    Yea, its actually really quite hard to get fat to burn in the first place, once you've started the reaction then it'll work quite happily off it but to get it going is difficult. Thats what the 'barrier' is in marathon running, its the time whilst the fat reaction is still starting up so theres actually a lack of energy for the muscles.
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    (Original post by mipegg)
    Yea, its actually really quite hard to get fat to burn in the first place, once you've started the reaction then it'll work quite happily off it but to get it going is difficult. Thats what the 'barrier' is in marathon running, its the time whilst the fat reaction is still starting up so theres actually a lack of energy for the muscles.
    i know that much, fat needs to be converted into a useable form, hence why it takes time.

    didn't realise that muscle was more useable, woulda figured it's a bit less useable.

    aparently thats not true though :woo:
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    (Original post by yoshifumu)
    i know that much, fat needs to be converted into a useable form, hence why it takes time.

    didn't realise that muscle was more useable, woulda figured it's a bit less useable.

    aparently thats not true though :woo:
    http://www.indoorclimbing.com/muscles.html

    Explains it quite well
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    (Original post by mipegg)
    http://www.indoorclimbing.com/muscles.html

    Explains it quite well
    only relevant part:
    After your glycogen stores are used up your body obtains its energy from fatty acid metabolism and amino acid protein metabolism. These reactions are not efficient, which consequently cause your strength and endurance to drop drastically.
    otherwise the rest i know in more detail than given.

    still helpful for other peoples though

    still dunno why muscle is easier to burn than fat.
 
 
 
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