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    Hello, I need the experimental procedure to carry out hydrogen peroxide decomposition while varying the factors that determine rates of reaction. I met with failure while searching all over the google with a load of keywords. If you know the procedure, please let me share the knowledge, especially on how i can measure the rate of this reaction.
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    What are the products of the decomposition of H2O2? Do you see any way in which you could measure how much product has been produced?
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    (Original post by around)
    What are the products of the decomposition of H2O2? Do you see any way in which you could measure how much product has been produced?
    By measuring oxygen? But I don't know how i can do that, i mean the experimental details etc.
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    (Original post by ssadi)
    Hello, I need the experimental procedure to carry out hydrogen peroxide decomposition while varying the factors that determine rates of reaction. I met with failure while searching all over the google with a load of keywords. If you know the procedure, please let me share the knowledge, especially on how i can measure the rate of this reaction.
    This might be useful.
    http://www.docbrown.info/page03/AT1rates.htm
    http://www.docbrown.info/page03/3_31rates.htm
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    Flashbacks to the old simple experiments in the boiling tubes. Run along the oxygen line, try to see if you have a varying factor as your get more or less.
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    Thanks, that helps.
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    (Original post by b_white)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydroge...#Decomposition

    Surely this is rather simple to measure??? Just use a gas syringe to measure the amount of O2 given off (here I'm hoping not much O2 dissolves in the water created bby the decomposition etc.). Oh and you will need a stop-clock as well. And graph paper.
    I had the general idea, thanks for endorsing that. There isn't any finer details like precautions etc, is there? At least I couldn't find any, (but at least I tried).
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    I did the same experiment but for Biology instead of Chemistry lol
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    (Original post by b_white)
    Conical flask connected by tubing to gas syringe. Use stop clock and measure volume of gas every [x] (e.g. 30) seconds. Draw nice graph. Repeat with different conditions, or same conditions if you want to find an average for your results/identify anomalies. Temperature will almost certainly be a factor, as well as various catalysts (as shown from my wikipedia link). I guess you could have high pressure breaking the glass as a danger, although all I would do is disconnect everything once the gas syringe becomes full.
    Thanks
 
 
 

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